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Nutritional supplementation for Alzheimer's disease?

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW

Evidence for the benefit of nutrition in Alzheimer's disease continues to accumulate. Many studies with individual vitamins or supplements show marginal, if any, benefit. However, new findings with combinatorial formulations demonstrate improvement in cognitive performance and behavioral difficulties that accompany Alzheimer's disease. Herein, we review some of the most recent clinical advances and summarize supportive preclinical studies.

RECENT FINDINGS

We present novel positive effects on Alzheimer's disease derived from diet, trace elements, vitamins and supplements. We discuss the inherent difficulty in conducting nutritional studies because of the variance in participants' nutritional history, versus pharmacological interventions in which participants are naive to the intervention. We examine the evidence that epigenetics play a role in Alzheimer's disease and how nutritional intervention can modify the key epigenetic events to maintain or improve cognitive performance.

SUMMARY

Overall consideration of the most recent collective evidence suggests that the optimal approach for Alzheimer's disease would seem to combine early, multicomponent nutritional approaches (a Mediterranean-style diet, multivitamins and key combinatorial supplements), along with lifestyle modifications such as social activity and mental and physical exercise, with ultimate addition of pharmacological agents when warranted.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    aLaboratory for Neuroscience bDepartment of Biological Sciences, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts cFramingham State University, Framingham, Massachusetts, USA.

    Source

    Current opinion in psychiatry 28:2 2015 Mar pg 141-7

    MeSH

    Alzheimer Disease
    Animals
    Dietary Supplements
    Humans

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    25602242

    Citation

    Shea, Thomas B., and Ruth Remington. "Nutritional Supplementation for Alzheimer's Disease?" Current Opinion in Psychiatry, vol. 28, no. 2, 2015, pp. 141-7.
    Shea TB, Remington R. Nutritional supplementation for Alzheimer's disease? Curr Opin Psychiatry. 2015;28(2):141-7.
    Shea, T. B., & Remington, R. (2015). Nutritional supplementation for Alzheimer's disease? Current Opinion in Psychiatry, 28(2), pp. 141-7. doi:10.1097/YCO.0000000000000138.
    Shea TB, Remington R. Nutritional Supplementation for Alzheimer's Disease. Curr Opin Psychiatry. 2015;28(2):141-7. PubMed PMID: 25602242.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Nutritional supplementation for Alzheimer's disease? AU - Shea,Thomas B, AU - Remington,Ruth, PY - 2015/1/21/entrez PY - 2015/1/21/pubmed PY - 2015/7/21/medline SP - 141 EP - 7 JF - Current opinion in psychiatry JO - Curr Opin Psychiatry VL - 28 IS - 2 N2 - PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Evidence for the benefit of nutrition in Alzheimer's disease continues to accumulate. Many studies with individual vitamins or supplements show marginal, if any, benefit. However, new findings with combinatorial formulations demonstrate improvement in cognitive performance and behavioral difficulties that accompany Alzheimer's disease. Herein, we review some of the most recent clinical advances and summarize supportive preclinical studies. RECENT FINDINGS: We present novel positive effects on Alzheimer's disease derived from diet, trace elements, vitamins and supplements. We discuss the inherent difficulty in conducting nutritional studies because of the variance in participants' nutritional history, versus pharmacological interventions in which participants are naive to the intervention. We examine the evidence that epigenetics play a role in Alzheimer's disease and how nutritional intervention can modify the key epigenetic events to maintain or improve cognitive performance. SUMMARY: Overall consideration of the most recent collective evidence suggests that the optimal approach for Alzheimer's disease would seem to combine early, multicomponent nutritional approaches (a Mediterranean-style diet, multivitamins and key combinatorial supplements), along with lifestyle modifications such as social activity and mental and physical exercise, with ultimate addition of pharmacological agents when warranted. SN - 1473-6578 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25602242/Nutritional_supplementation_for_Alzheimer's_disease L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=25602242 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -