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Socio-economic resources, young child feeding practices, consumption of highly processed snacks and sugar-sweetened beverages: a population-based survey in rural northwestern Nicaragua.
BMC Public Health. 2015 Jan 21; 15:25.BP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Socio-economic resources may be associated with infant feeding in complex patterns in societies undergoing a nutrition transition. This study evaluates associations of housing quality, food security and maternal education to the World Health Organization (WHO) feeding recommendations and to consumption of highly processed snacks (HP snacks) and sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) in rural Nicaragua.

METHODS

Data were collected from May to November 2009, with mothers of 0- to 35-month-olds being asked about young child feeding using a food frequency questionnaire. A validated questionnaire was used to assess household food insecurity and data were collected on maternal education and housing quality. Pearson's chi-squared test was used to compare proportions and determine associations between the resources and young child feeding. The three socio-economic resources and other confounders were introduced to multivariate logistic regression analyses to assess the independent contribution of the resources to the feeding practices and consumption of HP snacks and SSBs.

RESULTS

Mothers with the lowest education level were more likely to be exclusively breastfeeding (EBF) their infants (OR not EBF: 0.19; 95% CI: 0.07, 0.51), whilst mothers of 6- to 35-month-olds in the lowest education category had more inadequate dietary diversity (DD) (OR for not meet DD: 2.04; 95% CI: 1.36, 3.08), were less likely to consume HP snacks (OR for HP snacks: 0.47; 95% CI: 0.32, 0.68) and SSBs (OR for SSBs: 0.68; 95% CI: 0.46, 0.98), compared to mothers with the highest level of education. Similarly, children residing in households with the highest food insecurity were also more prone to have inadequate dietary diversity (OR for not meet DD: 1.47; 95% CI: 1.05, 2.05). The odds for double burden of suboptimal feeding (concurrent inadequate diet and consumption of HP snacks/SSBs) were significantly lower in children of least educated mothers (OR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.44, 0.92).

CONCLUSIONS

Higher level of education was associated with both more and less adherence to the WHO recommended feeding practices as well as with more consumption of HP snacks and SSBs. Regardless of educational strata, the children in the community were exposed to suboptimal feeding practices conducive to both under- as well as overnutrition.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, SE-751 85, Uppsala, Sweden. mariela.contreras@kbh.uu.se.Asociación para el Desarrollo Económico y Social de El Espino (APRODESE), Chinandega, Nicaragua. fundchica@gmail.com.Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, SE-751 85, Uppsala, Sweden. lars-ake.persson@kbh.uu.se.Centre for Health Equity Studies, Karolinska Institutet/Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. anders.hjern@chess.su.se.Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, SE-751 85, Uppsala, Sweden. lotta.ekstrom@kbh.uu.se.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25604827

Citation

Contreras, Mariela, et al. "Socio-economic Resources, Young Child Feeding Practices, Consumption of Highly Processed Snacks and Sugar-sweetened Beverages: a Population-based Survey in Rural Northwestern Nicaragua." BMC Public Health, vol. 15, 2015, p. 25.
Contreras M, Blandón EZ, Persson LÅ, et al. Socio-economic resources, young child feeding practices, consumption of highly processed snacks and sugar-sweetened beverages: a population-based survey in rural northwestern Nicaragua. BMC Public Health. 2015;15:25.
Contreras, M., Blandón, E. Z., Persson, L. Å., Hjern, A., & Ekström, E. C. (2015). Socio-economic resources, young child feeding practices, consumption of highly processed snacks and sugar-sweetened beverages: a population-based survey in rural northwestern Nicaragua. BMC Public Health, 15, 25. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-015-1374-5
Contreras M, et al. Socio-economic Resources, Young Child Feeding Practices, Consumption of Highly Processed Snacks and Sugar-sweetened Beverages: a Population-based Survey in Rural Northwestern Nicaragua. BMC Public Health. 2015 Jan 21;15:25. PubMed PMID: 25604827.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Socio-economic resources, young child feeding practices, consumption of highly processed snacks and sugar-sweetened beverages: a population-based survey in rural northwestern Nicaragua. AU - Contreras,Mariela, AU - Blandón,Elmer Zelaya, AU - Persson,Lars-Åke, AU - Hjern,Anders, AU - Ekström,Eva-Charlotte, Y1 - 2015/01/21/ PY - 2014/04/30/received PY - 2015/01/07/accepted PY - 2015/1/22/entrez PY - 2015/1/22/pubmed PY - 2015/12/15/medline SP - 25 EP - 25 JF - BMC public health JO - BMC Public Health VL - 15 N2 - BACKGROUND: Socio-economic resources may be associated with infant feeding in complex patterns in societies undergoing a nutrition transition. This study evaluates associations of housing quality, food security and maternal education to the World Health Organization (WHO) feeding recommendations and to consumption of highly processed snacks (HP snacks) and sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) in rural Nicaragua. METHODS: Data were collected from May to November 2009, with mothers of 0- to 35-month-olds being asked about young child feeding using a food frequency questionnaire. A validated questionnaire was used to assess household food insecurity and data were collected on maternal education and housing quality. Pearson's chi-squared test was used to compare proportions and determine associations between the resources and young child feeding. The three socio-economic resources and other confounders were introduced to multivariate logistic regression analyses to assess the independent contribution of the resources to the feeding practices and consumption of HP snacks and SSBs. RESULTS: Mothers with the lowest education level were more likely to be exclusively breastfeeding (EBF) their infants (OR not EBF: 0.19; 95% CI: 0.07, 0.51), whilst mothers of 6- to 35-month-olds in the lowest education category had more inadequate dietary diversity (DD) (OR for not meet DD: 2.04; 95% CI: 1.36, 3.08), were less likely to consume HP snacks (OR for HP snacks: 0.47; 95% CI: 0.32, 0.68) and SSBs (OR for SSBs: 0.68; 95% CI: 0.46, 0.98), compared to mothers with the highest level of education. Similarly, children residing in households with the highest food insecurity were also more prone to have inadequate dietary diversity (OR for not meet DD: 1.47; 95% CI: 1.05, 2.05). The odds for double burden of suboptimal feeding (concurrent inadequate diet and consumption of HP snacks/SSBs) were significantly lower in children of least educated mothers (OR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.44, 0.92). CONCLUSIONS: Higher level of education was associated with both more and less adherence to the WHO recommended feeding practices as well as with more consumption of HP snacks and SSBs. Regardless of educational strata, the children in the community were exposed to suboptimal feeding practices conducive to both under- as well as overnutrition. SN - 1471-2458 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25604827/Socio_economic_resources_young_child_feeding_practices_consumption_of_highly_processed_snacks_and_sugar_sweetened_beverages:_a_population_based_survey_in_rural_northwestern_Nicaragua_ L2 - https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-015-1374-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -