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Comparison of strength training, aerobic training, and additional physical therapy as supplementary treatments for Parkinson's disease: pilot study.
Clin Interv Aging. 2015; 10:183-91.CI

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Physical rehabilitation is commonly used in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) to improve their health and alleviate the symptoms.

OBJECTIVE

We compared the effects of three programs, strength training (ST), aerobic training (AT), and physiotherapy, on motor symptoms, functional capacity, and electroencephalographic (EEG) activity in PD patients.

METHODS

Twenty-two patients were recruited and randomized into three groups: AT (70% of maximum heart rate), ST (80% of one repetition maximum), and physiotherapy (in groups). Subjects participated in their respective interventions twice a week for 12 weeks. The assessments included measures of disease symptoms (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale [UPDRS]), functional capacity (Senior Fitness Test), and EEG before and after 12 weeks of intervention.

RESULTS

The PD motor symptoms (UPDRS-III) in the group of patients who performed ST and AT improved by 27.5% (effect size [ES]=1.25, confidence interval [CI]=-0.11, 2.25) and 35% (ES=1.34, CI=-0.16, 2.58), respectively, in contrast to the physiotherapy group, which showed a 2.9% improvement (ES=0.07, CI=-0.85, 0.99). Furthermore, the functional capacity of all three groups improved after the intervention. The mean frequency of the EEG analysis mainly showed the effect of the interventions on the groups (F=11.50, P=0.0001).

CONCLUSION

ST and AT in patients with PD are associated with improved outcomes in disease symptoms and functional capacity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centro de Doença de Alzheimer e Outros Transtornos da Velhice, Instituto de Psiquiatria, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil ; Centro de Estudo e Pesquisa do Envelhecimento, Instituto Vital Brazil, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.Centro de Doença de Alzheimer e Outros Transtornos da Velhice, Instituto de Psiquiatria, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.Centro de Doença de Alzheimer e Outros Transtornos da Velhice, Instituto de Psiquiatria, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.Instituto de Neurologia Deolindo Couto, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.Instituto de Neurologia Deolindo Couto, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.Departamento de Educação Física da Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Pernambuco, Brazil.Departamento de Epidemiologia e Métodos Quantitativos em saúde. Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública-FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.Centro de Doença de Alzheimer e Outros Transtornos da Velhice, Instituto de Psiquiatria, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil ; Centro de Estudo e Pesquisa do Envelhecimento, Instituto Vital Brazil, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.Centro de Doença de Alzheimer e Outros Transtornos da Velhice, Instituto de Psiquiatria, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25609935

Citation

Carvalho, Alessandro, et al. "Comparison of Strength Training, Aerobic Training, and Additional Physical Therapy as Supplementary Treatments for Parkinson's Disease: Pilot Study." Clinical Interventions in Aging, vol. 10, 2015, pp. 183-91.
Carvalho A, Barbirato D, Araujo N, et al. Comparison of strength training, aerobic training, and additional physical therapy as supplementary treatments for Parkinson's disease: pilot study. Clin Interv Aging. 2015;10:183-91.
Carvalho, A., Barbirato, D., Araujo, N., Martins, J. V., Cavalcanti, J. L., Santos, T. M., Coutinho, E. S., Laks, J., & Deslandes, A. C. (2015). Comparison of strength training, aerobic training, and additional physical therapy as supplementary treatments for Parkinson's disease: pilot study. Clinical Interventions in Aging, 10, 183-91. https://doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S68779
Carvalho A, et al. Comparison of Strength Training, Aerobic Training, and Additional Physical Therapy as Supplementary Treatments for Parkinson's Disease: Pilot Study. Clin Interv Aging. 2015;10:183-91. PubMed PMID: 25609935.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Comparison of strength training, aerobic training, and additional physical therapy as supplementary treatments for Parkinson's disease: pilot study. AU - Carvalho,Alessandro, AU - Barbirato,Dannyel, AU - Araujo,Narahyana, AU - Martins,Jose Vicente, AU - Cavalcanti,Jose Luiz Sá, AU - Santos,Tony Meireles, AU - Coutinho,Evandro S, AU - Laks,Jerson, AU - Deslandes,Andrea C, Y1 - 2015/01/07/ PY - 2015/1/23/entrez PY - 2015/1/23/pubmed PY - 2015/9/17/medline KW - Parkinson’s disease KW - functional capacity KW - physical exercise KW - physical therapy KW - quality of life SP - 183 EP - 91 JF - Clinical interventions in aging JO - Clin Interv Aging VL - 10 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Physical rehabilitation is commonly used in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) to improve their health and alleviate the symptoms. OBJECTIVE: We compared the effects of three programs, strength training (ST), aerobic training (AT), and physiotherapy, on motor symptoms, functional capacity, and electroencephalographic (EEG) activity in PD patients. METHODS: Twenty-two patients were recruited and randomized into three groups: AT (70% of maximum heart rate), ST (80% of one repetition maximum), and physiotherapy (in groups). Subjects participated in their respective interventions twice a week for 12 weeks. The assessments included measures of disease symptoms (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale [UPDRS]), functional capacity (Senior Fitness Test), and EEG before and after 12 weeks of intervention. RESULTS: The PD motor symptoms (UPDRS-III) in the group of patients who performed ST and AT improved by 27.5% (effect size [ES]=1.25, confidence interval [CI]=-0.11, 2.25) and 35% (ES=1.34, CI=-0.16, 2.58), respectively, in contrast to the physiotherapy group, which showed a 2.9% improvement (ES=0.07, CI=-0.85, 0.99). Furthermore, the functional capacity of all three groups improved after the intervention. The mean frequency of the EEG analysis mainly showed the effect of the interventions on the groups (F=11.50, P=0.0001). CONCLUSION: ST and AT in patients with PD are associated with improved outcomes in disease symptoms and functional capacity. SN - 1178-1998 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25609935/Comparison_of_strength_training_aerobic_training_and_additional_physical_therapy_as_supplementary_treatments_for_Parkinson's_disease:_pilot_study_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S68779 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -