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Stem cell therapies for age-related macular degeneration: the past, present, and future.
Clin Interv Aging. 2015; 10:255-64.CI

Abstract

In the developed world, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the major causes of irreversible blindness in the elderly. Although management of neovascular AMD (wet AMD) has dramatically progressed, there is still no effective treatment for nonneovascular AMD (dry AMD), which is characterized by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell death (or dysfunction) and microenvironmental disruption in the retina. Therefore, RPE replacement and microenvironmental regulation represent viable treatments for dry AMD. Recent advances in cell biology have demonstrated that RPE cells can be easily generated from several cell types (pluripotent stem cells, multipotent stem cells, or even somatic cells) by spontaneous differentiation, coculturing, defined factors or cell reprogramming, respectively. Additionally, in vivo studies also showed that the restoration of visual function could be obtained by transplanting functional RPE cells into the subretinal space of recipient. More importantly, clinical trials approved by the US government have shown promising prospects in RPE transplantation. However, key issues such as implantation techniques, immune rejection, and xeno-free techniques are still needed to be further investigated. This review will summarize recent advances in cell transplantation for dry AMD. The obstacles and prospects in this field will also be discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Ophthalmology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, People's Republic of China ; Clinical Stem Cell Research Center, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, People's Republic of China ; Department of Ophthalmology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, People's Republic of China.Department of Ophthalmology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, People's Republic of China ; Clinical Stem Cell Research Center, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, People's Republic of China.Department of Ophthalmology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, People's Republic of China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25609937

Citation

Dang, Yalong, et al. "Stem Cell Therapies for Age-related Macular Degeneration: the Past, Present, and Future." Clinical Interventions in Aging, vol. 10, 2015, pp. 255-64.
Dang Y, Zhang C, Zhu Y. Stem cell therapies for age-related macular degeneration: the past, present, and future. Clin Interv Aging. 2015;10:255-64.
Dang, Y., Zhang, C., & Zhu, Y. (2015). Stem cell therapies for age-related macular degeneration: the past, present, and future. Clinical Interventions in Aging, 10, 255-64. https://doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S73705
Dang Y, Zhang C, Zhu Y. Stem Cell Therapies for Age-related Macular Degeneration: the Past, Present, and Future. Clin Interv Aging. 2015;10:255-64. PubMed PMID: 25609937.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Stem cell therapies for age-related macular degeneration: the past, present, and future. AU - Dang,Yalong, AU - Zhang,Chun, AU - Zhu,Yu, Y1 - 2015/01/14/ PY - 2015/1/23/entrez PY - 2015/1/23/pubmed PY - 2015/9/19/medline KW - age-related macular degeneration KW - cell reprogramming KW - clinical trial KW - retinal pigment epithelium KW - stem cell SP - 255 EP - 64 JF - Clinical interventions in aging JO - Clin Interv Aging VL - 10 N2 - In the developed world, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the major causes of irreversible blindness in the elderly. Although management of neovascular AMD (wet AMD) has dramatically progressed, there is still no effective treatment for nonneovascular AMD (dry AMD), which is characterized by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell death (or dysfunction) and microenvironmental disruption in the retina. Therefore, RPE replacement and microenvironmental regulation represent viable treatments for dry AMD. Recent advances in cell biology have demonstrated that RPE cells can be easily generated from several cell types (pluripotent stem cells, multipotent stem cells, or even somatic cells) by spontaneous differentiation, coculturing, defined factors or cell reprogramming, respectively. Additionally, in vivo studies also showed that the restoration of visual function could be obtained by transplanting functional RPE cells into the subretinal space of recipient. More importantly, clinical trials approved by the US government have shown promising prospects in RPE transplantation. However, key issues such as implantation techniques, immune rejection, and xeno-free techniques are still needed to be further investigated. This review will summarize recent advances in cell transplantation for dry AMD. The obstacles and prospects in this field will also be discussed. SN - 1178-1998 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25609937/Stem_cell_therapies_for_age_related_macular_degeneration:_the_past_present_and_future_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S73705 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -