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Antimicrobials increase travelers' risk of colonization by extended-spectrum betalactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae.
Clin Infect Dis. 2015 Mar 15; 60(6):837-46.CI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

More than 300 million travelers visit regions with poor hygiene annually. A significant percentage of them become colonized by resistant intestinal bacteria such as extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-PE) and may transmit the strains to others and to medical care settings when they return home. Despite the threats to global healthcare caused by an upsurge in antimicrobial resistance, no effort has been centered on prevention of colonization while traveling.

METHODS

Stool samples were collected from 430 Finns before and after traveling outside Scandinavia. All specimens were analyzed for ESBL- and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE). Questionnaires were used to survey volunteers about use of antimicrobials as well as other potential risk factors. The results were subjected to multivariable analysis.

RESULTS

Twenty-one percent (90/430) of the travelers became colonized by ESBL-PE and none by CPE. Geographic region, occurrence of travelers' diarrhea (TD), age, and use of antimicrobial (AB) for TD were identified as independent risk factors predisposing to contracting ESBL-PE. Eleven percent of those in subgroup TD-AB-, 21% in TD+AB-, and 37% in TD+AB+ acquired ESBL-PE. The risk proved to be highest in South Asia (46%); 23% became colonized in subgroup TD-AB-, 47% in TD+AB-, and 80% in TD+AB+. In Southeast Asia, the rates were 14%, 37%, and 69%, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

TD and antimicrobials for TD proved to be independent risk factors, with up to 80% of TD+AB+ travelers contracting ESBL-PE. In modern pre-travel counseling for those visiting high-risk regions, travelers should be advised against taking antibiotics for mild or moderate TD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Helsinki Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Helsinki University Hospital Department of Bacteriology and Immunology, University of Helsinki Aava Travel Clinic, Medical Centre Aava.Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Helsinki Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Helsinki University Hospital.Department of Clinical Microbiology, Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki.Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Helsinki University Hospital Department of Bacteriology and Immunology, University of Helsinki.Department of Bacteriology and Immunology, University of Helsinki.National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.Department of Clinical Microbiology, Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki.Department of Clinical Microbiology, Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25613287

Citation

Kantele, Anu, et al. "Antimicrobials Increase Travelers' Risk of Colonization By Extended-spectrum Betalactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae." Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 60, no. 6, 2015, pp. 837-46.
Kantele A, Lääveri T, Mero S, et al. Antimicrobials increase travelers' risk of colonization by extended-spectrum betalactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Clin Infect Dis. 2015;60(6):837-46.
Kantele, A., Lääveri, T., Mero, S., Vilkman, K., Pakkanen, S. H., Ollgren, J., Antikainen, J., & Kirveskari, J. (2015). Antimicrobials increase travelers' risk of colonization by extended-spectrum betalactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 60(6), 837-46. https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciu957
Kantele A, et al. Antimicrobials Increase Travelers' Risk of Colonization By Extended-spectrum Betalactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Clin Infect Dis. 2015 Mar 15;60(6):837-46. PubMed PMID: 25613287.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Antimicrobials increase travelers' risk of colonization by extended-spectrum betalactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae. AU - Kantele,Anu, AU - Lääveri,Tinja, AU - Mero,Sointu, AU - Vilkman,Katri, AU - Pakkanen,Sari H, AU - Ollgren,Jukka, AU - Antikainen,Jenni, AU - Kirveskari,Juha, Y1 - 2015/01/21/ PY - 2015/1/24/entrez PY - 2015/1/24/pubmed PY - 2015/12/15/medline KW - ESBL KW - antimicrobials KW - colonization KW - travel KW - travelers’ diarrhea SP - 837 EP - 46 JF - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America JO - Clin. Infect. Dis. VL - 60 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: More than 300 million travelers visit regions with poor hygiene annually. A significant percentage of them become colonized by resistant intestinal bacteria such as extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-PE) and may transmit the strains to others and to medical care settings when they return home. Despite the threats to global healthcare caused by an upsurge in antimicrobial resistance, no effort has been centered on prevention of colonization while traveling. METHODS: Stool samples were collected from 430 Finns before and after traveling outside Scandinavia. All specimens were analyzed for ESBL- and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE). Questionnaires were used to survey volunteers about use of antimicrobials as well as other potential risk factors. The results were subjected to multivariable analysis. RESULTS: Twenty-one percent (90/430) of the travelers became colonized by ESBL-PE and none by CPE. Geographic region, occurrence of travelers' diarrhea (TD), age, and use of antimicrobial (AB) for TD were identified as independent risk factors predisposing to contracting ESBL-PE. Eleven percent of those in subgroup TD-AB-, 21% in TD+AB-, and 37% in TD+AB+ acquired ESBL-PE. The risk proved to be highest in South Asia (46%); 23% became colonized in subgroup TD-AB-, 47% in TD+AB-, and 80% in TD+AB+. In Southeast Asia, the rates were 14%, 37%, and 69%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: TD and antimicrobials for TD proved to be independent risk factors, with up to 80% of TD+AB+ travelers contracting ESBL-PE. In modern pre-travel counseling for those visiting high-risk regions, travelers should be advised against taking antibiotics for mild or moderate TD. SN - 1537-6591 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25613287/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/cid/ciu957 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -