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Study of trace elements in liver cirrhosis patients and their role in prognosis of disease.

Abstract

The objectives of this study are to evaluate trace elements in patients with liver cirrhosis and to assess their association with severity of the disease. One hundred fifty cirrhotic subjects of either sex ranging in age from 20-70 years were included in the study, and the results were compared with 50 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. All cirrhotic subjects were assessed for severity of disease as mild (Child A), moderate (Child B), and severe (Child C) as per Child-Pugh classification. Routine investigations were done and trace elements (Cu, Zn, Se, and Mg) were analyzed on atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Serum level of copper was found significantly increased in patients with liver cirrhosis as compared to control group. Whereas serum zinc, selenium, and magnesium levels were significantly decreased in cirrhotic subjects as compared to controls. Trace elements were compared with severity of liver cirrhosis. Serum copper concentration was slightly increased in patients with more severe clinical state of liver cirrhosis; however, mean level difference of copper among the Child-Pugh groups were statistically not significant. Moreover, there was no significant correlation between copper and Child-Pugh Score. However, copper showed a significant negative correlation with zinc. Serum zinc, magnesium, and selenium levels were significantly decreased with advancement of liver disease as compared to early stage of liver cirrhosis and showed a significant negative correlation with Child-Pugh Score. Trace element abnormalities may reflect the condition of liver dysfunction. These results suggest that liver dysfunction may alter the metabolism of trace elements. Our study shows that micronutrients status in liver cirrhosis correlates well with severity of liver cirrhosis. Micronutrients supplementation in liver cirrhotic patients may prevent progression of disease and development of complications; however, further research needs to be done.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Biochemistry, SMS Medical College, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India.

    , , , ,

    Source

    Biological trace element research 165:1 2015 May pg 35-40

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Case-Control Studies
    Copper
    Female
    Humans
    Liver Cirrhosis
    Magnesium
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Prognosis
    Selenium
    Trace Elements
    Young Adult
    Zinc

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    25613584

    Citation

    Nangliya, Vijaylaxmi, et al. "Study of Trace Elements in Liver Cirrhosis Patients and Their Role in Prognosis of Disease." Biological Trace Element Research, vol. 165, no. 1, 2015, pp. 35-40.
    Nangliya V, Sharma A, Yadav D, et al. Study of trace elements in liver cirrhosis patients and their role in prognosis of disease. Biol Trace Elem Res. 2015;165(1):35-40.
    Nangliya, V., Sharma, A., Yadav, D., Sunder, S., Nijhawan, S., & Mishra, S. (2015). Study of trace elements in liver cirrhosis patients and their role in prognosis of disease. Biological Trace Element Research, 165(1), pp. 35-40. doi:10.1007/s12011-015-0237-3.
    Nangliya V, et al. Study of Trace Elements in Liver Cirrhosis Patients and Their Role in Prognosis of Disease. Biol Trace Elem Res. 2015;165(1):35-40. PubMed PMID: 25613584.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Study of trace elements in liver cirrhosis patients and their role in prognosis of disease. AU - Nangliya,Vijaylaxmi, AU - Sharma,Anjali, AU - Yadav,Dharamveer, AU - Sunder,Shyam, AU - Nijhawan,Sandeep, AU - Mishra,Sandhya, Y1 - 2015/01/24/ PY - 2014/11/26/received PY - 2015/01/12/accepted PY - 2015/1/24/entrez PY - 2015/1/24/pubmed PY - 2016/1/12/medline SP - 35 EP - 40 JF - Biological trace element research JO - Biol Trace Elem Res VL - 165 IS - 1 N2 - The objectives of this study are to evaluate trace elements in patients with liver cirrhosis and to assess their association with severity of the disease. One hundred fifty cirrhotic subjects of either sex ranging in age from 20-70 years were included in the study, and the results were compared with 50 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. All cirrhotic subjects were assessed for severity of disease as mild (Child A), moderate (Child B), and severe (Child C) as per Child-Pugh classification. Routine investigations were done and trace elements (Cu, Zn, Se, and Mg) were analyzed on atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Serum level of copper was found significantly increased in patients with liver cirrhosis as compared to control group. Whereas serum zinc, selenium, and magnesium levels were significantly decreased in cirrhotic subjects as compared to controls. Trace elements were compared with severity of liver cirrhosis. Serum copper concentration was slightly increased in patients with more severe clinical state of liver cirrhosis; however, mean level difference of copper among the Child-Pugh groups were statistically not significant. Moreover, there was no significant correlation between copper and Child-Pugh Score. However, copper showed a significant negative correlation with zinc. Serum zinc, magnesium, and selenium levels were significantly decreased with advancement of liver disease as compared to early stage of liver cirrhosis and showed a significant negative correlation with Child-Pugh Score. Trace element abnormalities may reflect the condition of liver dysfunction. These results suggest that liver dysfunction may alter the metabolism of trace elements. Our study shows that micronutrients status in liver cirrhosis correlates well with severity of liver cirrhosis. Micronutrients supplementation in liver cirrhotic patients may prevent progression of disease and development of complications; however, further research needs to be done. SN - 1559-0720 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25613584/full_citation L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12011-015-0237-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -