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Dieting: proxy or cause of future weight gain?
Obes Rev. 2015 Feb; 16 Suppl 1:19-24.OR

Abstract

The relationship between dieting and body mass has a long and controversial history. This paper aims to help resolve this issue by making two key distinctions. The first is between dieting as a cause of weight gain/regain and as a proxy risk factor for identifying non-obese individuals prone to weight gain for reasons other than dieting. The second is between the body mass that is attained following one or more weight loss/regain cycles and the body mass that might have been reached had dieting never been undertaken. Evidence is reviewed on the relation between recent diet-induced weight loss and sustained weight loss (weight suppression), on the one hand, and weight regain, on the other hand. Furthermore, the reason that a history of dieting in non-obese individuals reflects a susceptibility to future weight gain is explained. It is concluded that (i) diet-induced weight loss hastens weight regain but a history of weight loss diets does not cause weight gain beyond that which would occur in the absence of dieting, and (ii) weight loss dieting in non-obese individuals does not cause future weight gain but is simply a proxy risk factor reflecting a personal vulnerability to weight gain and living in an obesogenic environment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25614200

Citation

Lowe, M R.. "Dieting: Proxy or Cause of Future Weight Gain?" Obesity Reviews : an Official Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, vol. 16 Suppl 1, 2015, pp. 19-24.
Lowe MR. Dieting: proxy or cause of future weight gain? Obes Rev. 2015;16 Suppl 1:19-24.
Lowe, M. R. (2015). Dieting: proxy or cause of future weight gain? Obesity Reviews : an Official Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, 16 Suppl 1, 19-24. https://doi.org/10.1111/obr.12252
Lowe MR. Dieting: Proxy or Cause of Future Weight Gain. Obes Rev. 2015;16 Suppl 1:19-24. PubMed PMID: 25614200.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dieting: proxy or cause of future weight gain? A1 - Lowe,M R, PY - 2015/1/24/entrez PY - 2015/1/24/pubmed PY - 2015/11/13/medline KW - Dieting KW - obesity KW - weight gain KW - weight regain SP - 19 EP - 24 JF - Obesity reviews : an official journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity JO - Obes Rev VL - 16 Suppl 1 N2 - The relationship between dieting and body mass has a long and controversial history. This paper aims to help resolve this issue by making two key distinctions. The first is between dieting as a cause of weight gain/regain and as a proxy risk factor for identifying non-obese individuals prone to weight gain for reasons other than dieting. The second is between the body mass that is attained following one or more weight loss/regain cycles and the body mass that might have been reached had dieting never been undertaken. Evidence is reviewed on the relation between recent diet-induced weight loss and sustained weight loss (weight suppression), on the one hand, and weight regain, on the other hand. Furthermore, the reason that a history of dieting in non-obese individuals reflects a susceptibility to future weight gain is explained. It is concluded that (i) diet-induced weight loss hastens weight regain but a history of weight loss diets does not cause weight gain beyond that which would occur in the absence of dieting, and (ii) weight loss dieting in non-obese individuals does not cause future weight gain but is simply a proxy risk factor reflecting a personal vulnerability to weight gain and living in an obesogenic environment. SN - 1467-789X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25614200/Dieting:_proxy_or_cause_of_future_weight_gain L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/obr.12252 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -