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The effects of acute salinity challenges on osmoregulation in Mozambique tilapia reared in a tidally changing salinity.
J Exp Biol. 2015 Mar; 218(Pt 5):731-9.JE

Abstract

This study characterizes the differences in osmoregulatory capacity among Mozambique tilapia, Oreochromis mossambicus, reared in freshwater (FW), in seawater (SW) or under tidally driven changes in salinity. This was addressed through the use of an abrupt exposure to a change in salinity. We measured changes in: (1) plasma osmolality and prolactin (PRL) levels; (2) pituitary expression of prolactin (PRL) and its receptors, PRLR1 and PRLR2; (3) branchial expression of PRLR1, PRLR2, Na(+)/Cl(-) co-transporter (NCC), Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) co-transporter (NKCC), α1a and α1b isoforms of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), aquaporin 3 (AQP3) and Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3 (NHE3). Mozambique tilapia reared in a tidal environment successfully adapted to SW while fish reared in FW did not survive a transfer to SW beyond the 6 h sampling. With the exception of CFTR, the change in the expression of ion pumps, transporters and channels was more gradual in fish transferred from tidally changing salinities to SW than in fish transferred from FW to SW. Upon transfer to SW, the increase in CFTR expression was more robust in tidal fish than in FW fish. Tidal and SW fish successfully adapted when transferred to FW. These results suggest that Mozambique tilapia reared in a tidally changing salinity, a condition that more closely represents their natural history, gain an adaptive advantage compared with fish reared in FW when facing a hyperosmotic challenge.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, Kaneohe, HI 96744, USA Department of Molecular Biosciences and Bioengineering, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA.Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, Kaneohe, HI 96744, USA University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA.Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, Kaneohe, HI 96744, USA.Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, Kaneohe, HI 96744, USA seale@hawaii.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25617466

Citation

Moorman, Benjamin P., et al. "The Effects of Acute Salinity Challenges On Osmoregulation in Mozambique Tilapia Reared in a Tidally Changing Salinity." The Journal of Experimental Biology, vol. 218, no. Pt 5, 2015, pp. 731-9.
Moorman BP, Lerner DT, Grau EG, et al. The effects of acute salinity challenges on osmoregulation in Mozambique tilapia reared in a tidally changing salinity. J Exp Biol. 2015;218(Pt 5):731-9.
Moorman, B. P., Lerner, D. T., Grau, E. G., & Seale, A. P. (2015). The effects of acute salinity challenges on osmoregulation in Mozambique tilapia reared in a tidally changing salinity. The Journal of Experimental Biology, 218(Pt 5), 731-9. https://doi.org/10.1242/jeb.112664
Moorman BP, et al. The Effects of Acute Salinity Challenges On Osmoregulation in Mozambique Tilapia Reared in a Tidally Changing Salinity. J Exp Biol. 2015;218(Pt 5):731-9. PubMed PMID: 25617466.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effects of acute salinity challenges on osmoregulation in Mozambique tilapia reared in a tidally changing salinity. AU - Moorman,Benjamin P, AU - Lerner,Darren T, AU - Grau,E Gordon, AU - Seale,Andre P, Y1 - 2015/01/23/ PY - 2015/1/25/entrez PY - 2015/1/27/pubmed PY - 2015/12/15/medline KW - Ion transporter KW - Osmoregulation KW - Prolactin KW - Rearing salinity KW - Tidal cycle KW - Tilapia SP - 731 EP - 9 JF - The Journal of experimental biology JO - J Exp Biol VL - 218 IS - Pt 5 N2 - This study characterizes the differences in osmoregulatory capacity among Mozambique tilapia, Oreochromis mossambicus, reared in freshwater (FW), in seawater (SW) or under tidally driven changes in salinity. This was addressed through the use of an abrupt exposure to a change in salinity. We measured changes in: (1) plasma osmolality and prolactin (PRL) levels; (2) pituitary expression of prolactin (PRL) and its receptors, PRLR1 and PRLR2; (3) branchial expression of PRLR1, PRLR2, Na(+)/Cl(-) co-transporter (NCC), Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) co-transporter (NKCC), α1a and α1b isoforms of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), aquaporin 3 (AQP3) and Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3 (NHE3). Mozambique tilapia reared in a tidal environment successfully adapted to SW while fish reared in FW did not survive a transfer to SW beyond the 6 h sampling. With the exception of CFTR, the change in the expression of ion pumps, transporters and channels was more gradual in fish transferred from tidally changing salinities to SW than in fish transferred from FW to SW. Upon transfer to SW, the increase in CFTR expression was more robust in tidal fish than in FW fish. Tidal and SW fish successfully adapted when transferred to FW. These results suggest that Mozambique tilapia reared in a tidally changing salinity, a condition that more closely represents their natural history, gain an adaptive advantage compared with fish reared in FW when facing a hyperosmotic challenge. SN - 1477-9145 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25617466/The_effects_of_acute_salinity_challenges_on_osmoregulation_in_Mozambique_tilapia_reared_in_a_tidally_changing_salinity_ L2 - http://jeb.biologists.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=25617466 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -