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Patient awareness of need for hepatitis a vaccination (prophylaxis) before international travel.
J Travel Med. 2015 May-Jun; 22(3):174-8.JT

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Although hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection is preventable through vaccination, cases associated with international travel continue to occur. The purpose of this study was to examine the frequency of international travel and countries visited among persons infected with HAV and assess reasons why travelers had not received hepatitis A vaccine before traveling.

METHODS

Using data from sentinel surveillance for HAV infection in seven US counties during 1996 to 2006, we examined the role of international travel in hepatitis A incidence and the reasons for patients not being vaccinated.

RESULTS

Of 2,002 hepatitis A patients for whom travel history was available, 300 (15%) reported traveling outside of the United States. Compared to non-travelers, travelers were more likely to be female [odds ratio (OR) = 1.74 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.35, 2.24)], aged 0 to 17 years [OR = 3.30 (1.83, 5.94)], Hispanic [OR = 3.69 (2.81, 4.86)], Asian [OR = 2.00 (1.06, 3.77)], and were less likely to be black non-Hispanic [OR = 0.30 (0.11, 0.82)]. The majority, 189 (61.6%), had traveled to Mexico. The most common reason for not getting pre-travel vaccination was "Didn't know I could [or should] get shots" [100/154 (65%)].

CONCLUSION

Low awareness of HAV vaccination was the predominant reason for not being protected before travel. Different modes of traveler education could improve prevention of hepatitis A. To highlight the risk of infection before traveling to endemic countries including Mexico, travel and consulate websites could list reminders of vaccine recommendations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Viral Hepatitis, Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch, Atlanta, GA, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25619557

Citation

Liu, Stephen J., et al. "Patient Awareness of Need for Hepatitis a Vaccination (prophylaxis) Before International Travel." Journal of Travel Medicine, vol. 22, no. 3, 2015, pp. 174-8.
Liu SJ, Sharapov U, Klevens M. Patient awareness of need for hepatitis a vaccination (prophylaxis) before international travel. J Travel Med. 2015;22(3):174-8.
Liu, S. J., Sharapov, U., & Klevens, M. (2015). Patient awareness of need for hepatitis a vaccination (prophylaxis) before international travel. Journal of Travel Medicine, 22(3), 174-8. https://doi.org/10.1111/jtm.12186
Liu SJ, Sharapov U, Klevens M. Patient Awareness of Need for Hepatitis a Vaccination (prophylaxis) Before International Travel. J Travel Med. 2015 May-Jun;22(3):174-8. PubMed PMID: 25619557.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Patient awareness of need for hepatitis a vaccination (prophylaxis) before international travel. AU - Liu,Stephen J, AU - Sharapov,Umid, AU - Klevens,Monina, Y1 - 2015/01/24/ PY - 2014/06/06/received PY - 2014/11/11/revised PY - 2014/11/12/accepted PY - 2015/1/27/entrez PY - 2015/1/27/pubmed PY - 2016/2/2/medline SP - 174 EP - 8 JF - Journal of travel medicine JO - J Travel Med VL - 22 IS - 3 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Although hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection is preventable through vaccination, cases associated with international travel continue to occur. The purpose of this study was to examine the frequency of international travel and countries visited among persons infected with HAV and assess reasons why travelers had not received hepatitis A vaccine before traveling. METHODS: Using data from sentinel surveillance for HAV infection in seven US counties during 1996 to 2006, we examined the role of international travel in hepatitis A incidence and the reasons for patients not being vaccinated. RESULTS: Of 2,002 hepatitis A patients for whom travel history was available, 300 (15%) reported traveling outside of the United States. Compared to non-travelers, travelers were more likely to be female [odds ratio (OR) = 1.74 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.35, 2.24)], aged 0 to 17 years [OR = 3.30 (1.83, 5.94)], Hispanic [OR = 3.69 (2.81, 4.86)], Asian [OR = 2.00 (1.06, 3.77)], and were less likely to be black non-Hispanic [OR = 0.30 (0.11, 0.82)]. The majority, 189 (61.6%), had traveled to Mexico. The most common reason for not getting pre-travel vaccination was "Didn't know I could [or should] get shots" [100/154 (65%)]. CONCLUSION: Low awareness of HAV vaccination was the predominant reason for not being protected before travel. Different modes of traveler education could improve prevention of hepatitis A. To highlight the risk of infection before traveling to endemic countries including Mexico, travel and consulate websites could list reminders of vaccine recommendations. SN - 1708-8305 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25619557/Patient_awareness_of_need_for_hepatitis_a_vaccination__prophylaxis__before_international_travel_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jtm/article-lookup/doi/10.1111/jtm.12186 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -