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Immunological characterization of the gluten fractions and their hydrolysates from wheat, rye and barley.
J Agric Food Chem. 2015 Feb 18; 63(6):1825-32.JA

Abstract

Gluten proteins in wheat, rye and barley cause celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine, which affects approximately 1% of the world population. Gluten is comprised of prolamin and glutelin. Since avoidance of dietary gluten is the only option for celiac patients, a sensitive gluten detection and quantitation method is warranted. Most regulatory agencies have set a threshold of 20 ppm gluten in foods labeled gluten-free, based on the currently available ELISA methods. However, these methods may exhibit differences in gluten quantitation from different gluten-containing grains. In this study, prolamin and glutelin fractions were isolated from wheat, rye, barley, oats and corn. Intact and pepsin-trypsin (PT)-digested prolamin and glutelin fractions were used to assess their immunoreactivity and gluten recovery by three sandwich and two competitive ELISA kits. The Western blots revealed varied affinity of ELISA antibodies to gluten-containing grain proteins and no reactivity to oat and corn proteins. ELISA results showed considerable variation in gluten recoveries from both intact and PT-digested gluten fractions among different kits. Prolamin fractions showed higher gluten recovery compared to their respective glutelin fractions. Among prolamins, barley exhibited higher recovery compared to wheat and rye with most of the ELISA kits used. Hydrolysis resulted in reduced gluten recovery of most gluten fractions. These results suggest that the suitability of ELISA for accurate gluten quantitation is dependent upon various factors, such as grain source, antibody specificity, gluten proteins and the level of their hydrolysis in foods.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Immunobiology Branch, Office of Applied Research and Safety Assessment, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, U.S. Food and Drug Administration , 8301 Muirkirk Road, Laurel, Maryland 20708, United States.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25619974

Citation

Rallabhandi, Prasad, et al. "Immunological Characterization of the Gluten Fractions and Their Hydrolysates From Wheat, Rye and Barley." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol. 63, no. 6, 2015, pp. 1825-32.
Rallabhandi P, Sharma GM, Pereira M, et al. Immunological characterization of the gluten fractions and their hydrolysates from wheat, rye and barley. J Agric Food Chem. 2015;63(6):1825-32.
Rallabhandi, P., Sharma, G. M., Pereira, M., & Williams, K. M. (2015). Immunological characterization of the gluten fractions and their hydrolysates from wheat, rye and barley. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 63(6), 1825-32. https://doi.org/10.1021/jf505716p
Rallabhandi P, et al. Immunological Characterization of the Gluten Fractions and Their Hydrolysates From Wheat, Rye and Barley. J Agric Food Chem. 2015 Feb 18;63(6):1825-32. PubMed PMID: 25619974.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Immunological characterization of the gluten fractions and their hydrolysates from wheat, rye and barley. AU - Rallabhandi,Prasad, AU - Sharma,Girdhari M, AU - Pereira,Marion, AU - Williams,Kristina M, Y1 - 2015/02/05/ PY - 2015/1/27/entrez PY - 2015/1/27/pubmed PY - 2015/12/17/medline KW - ELISA KW - allergens KW - celiac disease KW - gluten KW - gluten-free KW - wheat SP - 1825 EP - 32 JF - Journal of agricultural and food chemistry JO - J. Agric. Food Chem. VL - 63 IS - 6 N2 - Gluten proteins in wheat, rye and barley cause celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine, which affects approximately 1% of the world population. Gluten is comprised of prolamin and glutelin. Since avoidance of dietary gluten is the only option for celiac patients, a sensitive gluten detection and quantitation method is warranted. Most regulatory agencies have set a threshold of 20 ppm gluten in foods labeled gluten-free, based on the currently available ELISA methods. However, these methods may exhibit differences in gluten quantitation from different gluten-containing grains. In this study, prolamin and glutelin fractions were isolated from wheat, rye, barley, oats and corn. Intact and pepsin-trypsin (PT)-digested prolamin and glutelin fractions were used to assess their immunoreactivity and gluten recovery by three sandwich and two competitive ELISA kits. The Western blots revealed varied affinity of ELISA antibodies to gluten-containing grain proteins and no reactivity to oat and corn proteins. ELISA results showed considerable variation in gluten recoveries from both intact and PT-digested gluten fractions among different kits. Prolamin fractions showed higher gluten recovery compared to their respective glutelin fractions. Among prolamins, barley exhibited higher recovery compared to wheat and rye with most of the ELISA kits used. Hydrolysis resulted in reduced gluten recovery of most gluten fractions. These results suggest that the suitability of ELISA for accurate gluten quantitation is dependent upon various factors, such as grain source, antibody specificity, gluten proteins and the level of their hydrolysis in foods. SN - 1520-5118 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25619974/Immunological_characterization_of_the_gluten_fractions_and_their_hydrolysates_from_wheat_rye_and_barley_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf505716p DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -