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Remembering pain after surgery: a longitudinal examination of the role of pain catastrophizing in children's and parents' recall.
Pain. 2015 May; 156(5):800-808.PAIN

Abstract

Children's memories for pain play a powerful role in their pain experiences. Parents' memories may also influence children's pain experiences, by influencing parent-child interactions about pain and children's cognitions and behaviors. Pain catastrophizing of children and parents has been implicated as a factor underlying memory biases; however, this has not been empirically examined. The current longitudinal study is the first to examine the role of pain catastrophizing of children and parents in the development of their pain memories after surgery. Participants were 49 youth (32 girls) aged 10 to 18 years undergoing major surgery and their parents. One week before surgery, children and parents completed measures of pain catastrophizing. Two weeks after surgery (the acute recovery period), children and parents completed measures of child pain intensity and affect. Two to 4 months after surgery, children's and parents' memories of child pain intensity and affect were elicited. Hierarchical linear regression models revealed that over and above covariates, parent catastrophizing about their child's pain (magnification, rumination) accounted for a significant portion of variance in children's affective and parents' sensory pain memories. Although parent catastrophizing had a direct effect on pain memories, mediation analyses revealed that child catastrophizing (helplessness) indirectly influenced children's and parents' pain memories through the child's postoperative pain experience. Findings highlight that aspects of catastrophic thinking about child pain before surgery are linked to distressing pain memories several months later. Although both child and parent catastrophizing influence pain memory development, parent catastrophizing is most influential to both children's and parents' evolving cognitions about child pain.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development, Seattle Children's Research Institute Department of Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, University of Washington Departments of Pediatrics, and Psychiatry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25630028

Citation

Noel, Melanie, et al. "Remembering Pain After Surgery: a Longitudinal Examination of the Role of Pain Catastrophizing in Children's and Parents' Recall." Pain, vol. 156, no. 5, 2015, pp. 800-808.
Noel M, Rabbitts JA, Tai GG, et al. Remembering pain after surgery: a longitudinal examination of the role of pain catastrophizing in children's and parents' recall. Pain. 2015;156(5):800-808.
Noel, M., Rabbitts, J. A., Tai, G. G., & Palermo, T. M. (2015). Remembering pain after surgery: a longitudinal examination of the role of pain catastrophizing in children's and parents' recall. Pain, 156(5), 800-808. https://doi.org/10.1097/j.pain.0000000000000102
Noel M, et al. Remembering Pain After Surgery: a Longitudinal Examination of the Role of Pain Catastrophizing in Children's and Parents' Recall. Pain. 2015;156(5):800-808. PubMed PMID: 25630028.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Remembering pain after surgery: a longitudinal examination of the role of pain catastrophizing in children's and parents' recall. AU - Noel,Melanie, AU - Rabbitts,Jennifer A, AU - Tai,Gabrielle G, AU - Palermo,Tonya M, PY - 2015/1/29/entrez PY - 2015/1/30/pubmed PY - 2016/1/27/medline SP - 800 EP - 808 JF - Pain JO - Pain VL - 156 IS - 5 N2 - Children's memories for pain play a powerful role in their pain experiences. Parents' memories may also influence children's pain experiences, by influencing parent-child interactions about pain and children's cognitions and behaviors. Pain catastrophizing of children and parents has been implicated as a factor underlying memory biases; however, this has not been empirically examined. The current longitudinal study is the first to examine the role of pain catastrophizing of children and parents in the development of their pain memories after surgery. Participants were 49 youth (32 girls) aged 10 to 18 years undergoing major surgery and their parents. One week before surgery, children and parents completed measures of pain catastrophizing. Two weeks after surgery (the acute recovery period), children and parents completed measures of child pain intensity and affect. Two to 4 months after surgery, children's and parents' memories of child pain intensity and affect were elicited. Hierarchical linear regression models revealed that over and above covariates, parent catastrophizing about their child's pain (magnification, rumination) accounted for a significant portion of variance in children's affective and parents' sensory pain memories. Although parent catastrophizing had a direct effect on pain memories, mediation analyses revealed that child catastrophizing (helplessness) indirectly influenced children's and parents' pain memories through the child's postoperative pain experience. Findings highlight that aspects of catastrophic thinking about child pain before surgery are linked to distressing pain memories several months later. Although both child and parent catastrophizing influence pain memory development, parent catastrophizing is most influential to both children's and parents' evolving cognitions about child pain. SN - 1872-6623 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25630028/Remembering_pain_after_surgery:_a_longitudinal_examination_of_the_role_of_pain_catastrophizing_in_children's_and_parents'_recall_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/j.pain.0000000000000102 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -