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An electrically conductive 3D scaffold based on a nonwoven web of poly(L-lactic acid) and conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene).
J Biomed Mater Res A. 2015 Aug; 103(8):2635-44.JB

Abstract

This study was to demonstrate that an extremely thin coating of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) on nonwoven microfibrous poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) web is of sufficient electrical conductivity and stability in aqueous environment to sustain electrical stimulation (ES) to cultured human skin fibroblasts. The PEDOT imparted the web a surface resistivity of approximately 0.1 KΩ/square without altering the web morphology. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrated that the surface chemistry of the PLLA/PEDOT is characteristic of both PLLA and PEDOT. The PEDOT-coated web also showed higher hydrophilicity, lower glass transition temperature and unchanged fiber crystallinity and thermal stability compared with the PLLA web. The addition of PEDOT to the web marginally increased the web's tensile strength and lowered the elongation. An electrical stability test showed that the PLLA/PEDOT structure was more stable than a polypyrrole treated PLLA fabric, showing only a slow deterioration in conductivity when exposed to culture medium. The cytotoxicity test showed that the PLLA/PEDOT scaffold was not cytotoxic and supported human dermal fibroblast adhesion, migration, and proliferation. Preliminary ES experiments have demonstrated that this conductive web mediated effective ES to fibroblasts. Therefore, this new conductive biodegradable scaffold may be used to electrically modulate cellular activity and tissue regeneration.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Key Laboratory for Biomechanics and Mechanobiology of Ministry of Education, School of Biological Science & Medical Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing, China. Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Laval University, Division of Regenerative Medicine, CHU de Quebec Research Centre, Quebec, Quebec, Canada.Oral Ecology Research Group, Faculty of Dentistry, Laval University, Quebec, Quebec, Canada.Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Laval University, Division of Regenerative Medicine, CHU de Quebec Research Centre, Quebec, Quebec, Canada. Oral Ecology Research Group, Faculty of Dentistry, Laval University, Quebec, Quebec, Canada.College of Textiles, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina. College of Textiles, Donghua University, Shanghai, China.Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Laval University, Division of Regenerative Medicine, CHU de Quebec Research Centre, Quebec, Quebec, Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25630631

Citation

Niu, Xufeng, et al. "An Electrically Conductive 3D Scaffold Based On a Nonwoven Web of poly(L-lactic Acid) and Conductive Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)." Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part A, vol. 103, no. 8, 2015, pp. 2635-44.
Niu X, Rouabhia M, Chiffot N, et al. An electrically conductive 3D scaffold based on a nonwoven web of poly(L-lactic acid) and conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene). J Biomed Mater Res A. 2015;103(8):2635-44.
Niu, X., Rouabhia, M., Chiffot, N., King, M. W., & Zhang, Z. (2015). An electrically conductive 3D scaffold based on a nonwoven web of poly(L-lactic acid) and conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene). Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part A, 103(8), 2635-44. https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.a.35408
Niu X, et al. An Electrically Conductive 3D Scaffold Based On a Nonwoven Web of poly(L-lactic Acid) and Conductive Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene). J Biomed Mater Res A. 2015;103(8):2635-44. PubMed PMID: 25630631.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - An electrically conductive 3D scaffold based on a nonwoven web of poly(L-lactic acid) and conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene). AU - Niu,Xufeng, AU - Rouabhia,Mahmoud, AU - Chiffot,Nicolas, AU - King,Martin W, AU - Zhang,Ze, Y1 - 2015/02/06/ PY - 2014/10/02/received PY - 2015/01/06/revised PY - 2015/01/21/accepted PY - 2015/1/30/entrez PY - 2015/1/30/pubmed PY - 2016/4/6/medline KW - PLLA non-woven web KW - electrical stability KW - electrical stimulation KW - fibroblasts KW - poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) SP - 2635 EP - 44 JF - Journal of biomedical materials research. Part A JO - J Biomed Mater Res A VL - 103 IS - 8 N2 - This study was to demonstrate that an extremely thin coating of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) on nonwoven microfibrous poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) web is of sufficient electrical conductivity and stability in aqueous environment to sustain electrical stimulation (ES) to cultured human skin fibroblasts. The PEDOT imparted the web a surface resistivity of approximately 0.1 KΩ/square without altering the web morphology. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrated that the surface chemistry of the PLLA/PEDOT is characteristic of both PLLA and PEDOT. The PEDOT-coated web also showed higher hydrophilicity, lower glass transition temperature and unchanged fiber crystallinity and thermal stability compared with the PLLA web. The addition of PEDOT to the web marginally increased the web's tensile strength and lowered the elongation. An electrical stability test showed that the PLLA/PEDOT structure was more stable than a polypyrrole treated PLLA fabric, showing only a slow deterioration in conductivity when exposed to culture medium. The cytotoxicity test showed that the PLLA/PEDOT scaffold was not cytotoxic and supported human dermal fibroblast adhesion, migration, and proliferation. Preliminary ES experiments have demonstrated that this conductive web mediated effective ES to fibroblasts. Therefore, this new conductive biodegradable scaffold may be used to electrically modulate cellular activity and tissue regeneration. SN - 1552-4965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25630631/An_electrically_conductive_3D_scaffold_based_on_a_nonwoven_web_of_poly_L_lactic_acid__and_conductive_poly_34_ethylenedioxythiophene__ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.a.35408 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -