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The overlap between cyberbullying and traditional bullying.
J Adolesc Health. 2015 May; 56(5):483-8.JA

Abstract

PURPOSE

Cyberbullying appears to be on the rise among adolescents due in part to increased access to electronic devices and less online supervision. Less is known about how cyberbullying differs from traditional bullying which occurs in person and the extent to which these two forms overlap. Our first aim was to examine the overlap of traditional bullying (relational, verbal, and physical) with cyberbullying. The second aim examined student- and school-level correlates of cyber victimization as compared to traditional victims. The final aim explored details of the cyberbullying experience (e.g., who sent the message, how was the message sent, and what was the message about).

METHODS

Data came from 28,104 adolescents (grades, 9-12) attending 58 high schools.

RESULTS

Approximately 23% of the youth reported being victims of any form of bullying (cyber, relational, physical, and verbal) within the last month, with 25.6% of those victims reporting being cyberbullied. The largest proportion (50.3%) of victims reported they were victimized by all four forms, whereas only 4.6% reported being only cyberbullied. Multilevel analyses indicated that as compared to those who were only traditionally bullied, those who were cyberbullied were more likely to have externalizing (odds ratio = 1.44) and internalizing symptoms (odds ratio = 1.25). Additional analyses examined detailed characteristics of the cyberbullying experiences, indicating a relatively high level of overlap between cyber and traditional bullying.

CONCLUSIONS

Implications for preventive interventions targeting youth involved with cyberbullying and its overlap with other forms of bullying are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Center for the Prevention of Youth Violence, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. Electronic address: twaasdorp@jhu.edu.Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Center for the Prevention of Youth Violence, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25631040

Citation

Waasdorp, Tracy E., and Catherine P. Bradshaw. "The Overlap Between Cyberbullying and Traditional Bullying." The Journal of Adolescent Health : Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine, vol. 56, no. 5, 2015, pp. 483-8.
Waasdorp TE, Bradshaw CP. The overlap between cyberbullying and traditional bullying. J Adolesc Health. 2015;56(5):483-8.
Waasdorp, T. E., & Bradshaw, C. P. (2015). The overlap between cyberbullying and traditional bullying. The Journal of Adolescent Health : Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine, 56(5), 483-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2014.12.002
Waasdorp TE, Bradshaw CP. The Overlap Between Cyberbullying and Traditional Bullying. J Adolesc Health. 2015;56(5):483-8. PubMed PMID: 25631040.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The overlap between cyberbullying and traditional bullying. AU - Waasdorp,Tracy E, AU - Bradshaw,Catherine P, Y1 - 2015/01/24/ PY - 2014/07/16/received PY - 2014/12/02/revised PY - 2014/12/03/accepted PY - 2015/1/30/entrez PY - 2015/1/30/pubmed PY - 2016/1/28/medline KW - Cyberbullying KW - Relational victimization KW - Traditional bullying SP - 483 EP - 8 JF - The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine JO - J Adolesc Health VL - 56 IS - 5 N2 - PURPOSE: Cyberbullying appears to be on the rise among adolescents due in part to increased access to electronic devices and less online supervision. Less is known about how cyberbullying differs from traditional bullying which occurs in person and the extent to which these two forms overlap. Our first aim was to examine the overlap of traditional bullying (relational, verbal, and physical) with cyberbullying. The second aim examined student- and school-level correlates of cyber victimization as compared to traditional victims. The final aim explored details of the cyberbullying experience (e.g., who sent the message, how was the message sent, and what was the message about). METHODS: Data came from 28,104 adolescents (grades, 9-12) attending 58 high schools. RESULTS: Approximately 23% of the youth reported being victims of any form of bullying (cyber, relational, physical, and verbal) within the last month, with 25.6% of those victims reporting being cyberbullied. The largest proportion (50.3%) of victims reported they were victimized by all four forms, whereas only 4.6% reported being only cyberbullied. Multilevel analyses indicated that as compared to those who were only traditionally bullied, those who were cyberbullied were more likely to have externalizing (odds ratio = 1.44) and internalizing symptoms (odds ratio = 1.25). Additional analyses examined detailed characteristics of the cyberbullying experiences, indicating a relatively high level of overlap between cyber and traditional bullying. CONCLUSIONS: Implications for preventive interventions targeting youth involved with cyberbullying and its overlap with other forms of bullying are discussed. SN - 1879-1972 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25631040/The_overlap_between_cyberbullying_and_traditional_bullying_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1054-139X(14)00758-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -