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Heart rate in pulmonary embolism.
Intern Emerg Med. 2015 Sep; 10(6):663-9.IE

Abstract

Heart rate is a rapidly available risk stratification parameter in acute pulmonary embolism (PE). We aimed to investigate the effectiveness of heart rate in predicting the outcome in acute PE. Data of 182 patients with acute PE were analysed retrospectively. Logistic regression models were calculated to investigate the associations between heart rate and in-hospital death, myocardial necrosis, PE status and presence of right ventricular dysfunction (RVD), respectively. ROC curve and cut-off values for heart rate predicting RVD as well as intermediate risk PE status in normotensive PE patients and for heart rate predicting in-hospital death and myocardial necrosis in all PE patients were calculated. ROC analysis for heart rate predicting RVD and intermediate risk PE were 0.706 and 0.718, respectively, with cut-off value of 86 beats/min. Regression models showed associations between heart rate >85 beats/min and both RVD (OR 4.871, 95 % CI 2.256-10.515, P = 0.000055) and intermediate risk PE (OR 5.244, 95 % CI 2.418-11.377, P = 0.000027). In hemodynamically stable and unstable PE patients, logistic regression models showed a borderline significant association between tachycardia and in-hospital death (OR 7.066, 95 % CI 0.764-65.292, P = 0.0849) and a significant association between heart rate and myocardial necrosis (OR 0.975, 95 % CI 0.959-0.991, P = 0.00203). ROC analysis for heart rate predicting in-hospital death and myocardial necrosis revealed AUC of 0.655 and 0.703 with heart rate cut-off values of 99.5 beats/min and 92.5 beats/min, respectively. An elevated heart rate in acute PE is connected with a worse outcome. Effectiveness in the prediction of RVD, intermediate PE status, cardiac injury and in-hospital death is acceptable. The cut-off value for the prediction of RVD and intermediate risk PE status in normotensive PE is 86 beats/min, while tachycardia predicts in-hospital death.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine II, University Medical Center Mainz, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Langenbeckstr. 1, 55131, Mainz, Germany, Karsten.Keller@unimedizin-mainz.de.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25633234

Citation

Keller, Karsten, et al. "Heart Rate in Pulmonary Embolism." Internal and Emergency Medicine, vol. 10, no. 6, 2015, pp. 663-9.
Keller K, Beule J, Coldewey M, et al. Heart rate in pulmonary embolism. Intern Emerg Med. 2015;10(6):663-9.
Keller, K., Beule, J., Coldewey, M., Dippold, W., & Balzer, J. O. (2015). Heart rate in pulmonary embolism. Internal and Emergency Medicine, 10(6), 663-9. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11739-015-1198-4
Keller K, et al. Heart Rate in Pulmonary Embolism. Intern Emerg Med. 2015;10(6):663-9. PubMed PMID: 25633234.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Heart rate in pulmonary embolism. AU - Keller,Karsten, AU - Beule,Johannes, AU - Coldewey,Meike, AU - Dippold,Wolfgang, AU - Balzer,Jörn Oliver, Y1 - 2015/01/30/ PY - 2014/11/08/received PY - 2015/01/16/accepted PY - 2015/1/31/entrez PY - 2015/1/31/pubmed PY - 2017/1/24/medline SP - 663 EP - 9 JF - Internal and emergency medicine JO - Intern Emerg Med VL - 10 IS - 6 N2 - Heart rate is a rapidly available risk stratification parameter in acute pulmonary embolism (PE). We aimed to investigate the effectiveness of heart rate in predicting the outcome in acute PE. Data of 182 patients with acute PE were analysed retrospectively. Logistic regression models were calculated to investigate the associations between heart rate and in-hospital death, myocardial necrosis, PE status and presence of right ventricular dysfunction (RVD), respectively. ROC curve and cut-off values for heart rate predicting RVD as well as intermediate risk PE status in normotensive PE patients and for heart rate predicting in-hospital death and myocardial necrosis in all PE patients were calculated. ROC analysis for heart rate predicting RVD and intermediate risk PE were 0.706 and 0.718, respectively, with cut-off value of 86 beats/min. Regression models showed associations between heart rate >85 beats/min and both RVD (OR 4.871, 95 % CI 2.256-10.515, P = 0.000055) and intermediate risk PE (OR 5.244, 95 % CI 2.418-11.377, P = 0.000027). In hemodynamically stable and unstable PE patients, logistic regression models showed a borderline significant association between tachycardia and in-hospital death (OR 7.066, 95 % CI 0.764-65.292, P = 0.0849) and a significant association between heart rate and myocardial necrosis (OR 0.975, 95 % CI 0.959-0.991, P = 0.00203). ROC analysis for heart rate predicting in-hospital death and myocardial necrosis revealed AUC of 0.655 and 0.703 with heart rate cut-off values of 99.5 beats/min and 92.5 beats/min, respectively. An elevated heart rate in acute PE is connected with a worse outcome. Effectiveness in the prediction of RVD, intermediate PE status, cardiac injury and in-hospital death is acceptable. The cut-off value for the prediction of RVD and intermediate risk PE status in normotensive PE is 86 beats/min, while tachycardia predicts in-hospital death. SN - 1970-9366 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25633234/Heart_rate_in_pulmonary_embolism_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11739-015-1198-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -