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Calcification is not the Achilles' heel of cold-water corals in an acidifying ocean.
Glob Chang Biol. 2015 Jun; 21(6):2238-48.GC

Abstract

Ocean acidification is thought to be a major threat to coral reefs: laboratory evidence and CO2 seep research has shown adverse effects on many coral species, although a few are resilient. There are concerns that cold-water corals are even more vulnerable as they live in areas where aragonite saturation (Ωara) is lower than in the tropics and is falling rapidly due to CO2 emissions. Here, we provide laboratory evidence that net (gross calcification minus dissolution) and gross calcification rates of three common cold-water corals, Caryophyllia smithii, Dendrophyllia cornigera, and Desmophyllum dianthus, are not affected by pCO2 levels expected for 2100 (pCO2 1058 μatm, Ωara 1.29), and nor are the rates of skeletal dissolution in D. dianthus. We transplanted D. dianthus to 350 m depth (pHT 8.02; pCO2 448 μatm, Ωara 2.58) and to a 3 m depth CO2 seep in oligotrophic waters (pHT 7.35; pCO2 2879 μatm, Ωara 0.76) and found that the transplants calcified at the same rates regardless of the pCO2 confirming their resilience to acidification, but at significantly lower rates than corals that were fed in aquaria. Our combination of field and laboratory evidence suggests that ocean acidification will not disrupt cold-water coral calcification although falling aragonite levels may affect other organismal physiological and/or reef community processes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

UR 227 CoReUs 2, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, Nouméa, New Caledonia; Marine Environment Laboratories, International Atomic Energy Agency, 4 Quai Antoine 1er, Monaco, 98000, Monaco.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25641230

Citation

Rodolfo-Metalpa, Riccardo, et al. "Calcification Is Not the Achilles' Heel of Cold-water Corals in an Acidifying Ocean." Global Change Biology, vol. 21, no. 6, 2015, pp. 2238-48.
Rodolfo-Metalpa R, Montagna P, Aliani S, et al. Calcification is not the Achilles' heel of cold-water corals in an acidifying ocean. Glob Chang Biol. 2015;21(6):2238-48.
Rodolfo-Metalpa, R., Montagna, P., Aliani, S., Borghini, M., Canese, S., Hall-Spencer, J. M., Foggo, A., Milazzo, M., Taviani, M., & Houlbrèque, F. (2015). Calcification is not the Achilles' heel of cold-water corals in an acidifying ocean. Global Change Biology, 21(6), 2238-48. https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.12867
Rodolfo-Metalpa R, et al. Calcification Is Not the Achilles' Heel of Cold-water Corals in an Acidifying Ocean. Glob Chang Biol. 2015;21(6):2238-48. PubMed PMID: 25641230.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Calcification is not the Achilles' heel of cold-water corals in an acidifying ocean. AU - Rodolfo-Metalpa,Riccardo, AU - Montagna,Paolo, AU - Aliani,Stefano, AU - Borghini,Mireno, AU - Canese,Simonepietro, AU - Hall-Spencer,Jason M, AU - Foggo,Andy, AU - Milazzo,Marco, AU - Taviani,Marco, AU - Houlbrèque,Fanny, Y1 - 2015/03/06/ PY - 2014/06/22/received PY - 2014/12/16/revised PY - 2014/12/18/accepted PY - 2015/2/3/entrez PY - 2015/2/3/pubmed PY - 2016/3/24/medline KW - Caryophyllia smithii KW - Dendrophyllia cornigera KW - Desmophyllum dianthus KW - calcification and dissolution KW - cold-water corals KW - ocean acidification SP - 2238 EP - 48 JF - Global change biology JO - Glob Chang Biol VL - 21 IS - 6 N2 - Ocean acidification is thought to be a major threat to coral reefs: laboratory evidence and CO2 seep research has shown adverse effects on many coral species, although a few are resilient. There are concerns that cold-water corals are even more vulnerable as they live in areas where aragonite saturation (Ωara) is lower than in the tropics and is falling rapidly due to CO2 emissions. Here, we provide laboratory evidence that net (gross calcification minus dissolution) and gross calcification rates of three common cold-water corals, Caryophyllia smithii, Dendrophyllia cornigera, and Desmophyllum dianthus, are not affected by pCO2 levels expected for 2100 (pCO2 1058 μatm, Ωara 1.29), and nor are the rates of skeletal dissolution in D. dianthus. We transplanted D. dianthus to 350 m depth (pHT 8.02; pCO2 448 μatm, Ωara 2.58) and to a 3 m depth CO2 seep in oligotrophic waters (pHT 7.35; pCO2 2879 μatm, Ωara 0.76) and found that the transplants calcified at the same rates regardless of the pCO2 confirming their resilience to acidification, but at significantly lower rates than corals that were fed in aquaria. Our combination of field and laboratory evidence suggests that ocean acidification will not disrupt cold-water coral calcification although falling aragonite levels may affect other organismal physiological and/or reef community processes. SN - 1365-2486 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25641230/Calcification_is_not_the_Achilles'_heel_of_cold_water_corals_in_an_acidifying_ocean_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.12867 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -