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Racial/ethnic differences in identity and mental health outcomes among young sexual minority women.
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2015 Jul; 21(3):380-390.CD

Abstract

Previous research suggests that sexual minorities are at greater risk for trauma exposure, mental health problems, and substance use. To date, few studies have examined racial/ethnic differences among sexual minorities in relation to health-related behaviors and outcomes. Furthermore, studies of racial/ethnic differences among young adult sexual minority women (SMW) are virtually nonexistent. The current study adds to the previous literature by exploring differences in trauma exposure, sexual identity, mental health, and substance use in a nonprobability national sample of young adult SMW. A total of 967 self- identified lesbian and bisexual women were recruited via the Internet using social networking sites to participate in a larger longitudinal study on young women's health behaviors. The present study included 730 (76%) White, 108 (10%) African American, 91 (9%) Latina, and 38 (4%) Asian women ages 18 to 25 years. Results revealed differences in socioeconomic variables, degree of outness to family, childhood sexual assault, and forcible rape, but not overall lifetime trauma exposure. Among mental health and health-related behavior variables, few differences between groups emerged. Our findings indicate that both researchers and clinicians should turn their attention to processes of resilience among young SMW, particularly young SMW of color.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Pacific Graduate School of Psychology, Palo Alto University.Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.Department of Psychology, State University of New York at Buffalo.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25642782

Citation

Balsam, Kimberly F., et al. "Racial/ethnic Differences in Identity and Mental Health Outcomes Among Young Sexual Minority Women." Cultural Diversity & Ethnic Minority Psychology, vol. 21, no. 3, 2015, pp. 380-390.
Balsam KF, Molina Y, Blayney JA, et al. Racial/ethnic differences in identity and mental health outcomes among young sexual minority women. Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2015;21(3):380-390.
Balsam, K. F., Molina, Y., Blayney, J. A., Dillworth, T., Zimmerman, L., & Kaysen, D. (2015). Racial/ethnic differences in identity and mental health outcomes among young sexual minority women. Cultural Diversity & Ethnic Minority Psychology, 21(3), 380-390. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0038680
Balsam KF, et al. Racial/ethnic Differences in Identity and Mental Health Outcomes Among Young Sexual Minority Women. Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2015;21(3):380-390. PubMed PMID: 25642782.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Racial/ethnic differences in identity and mental health outcomes among young sexual minority women. AU - Balsam,Kimberly F, AU - Molina,Yamile, AU - Blayney,Jessica A, AU - Dillworth,Tiara, AU - Zimmerman,Lindsey, AU - Kaysen,Debra, Y1 - 2015/02/02/ PY - 2015/2/3/entrez PY - 2015/2/3/pubmed PY - 2016/12/17/medline SP - 380 EP - 390 JF - Cultural diversity & ethnic minority psychology JO - Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol VL - 21 IS - 3 N2 - Previous research suggests that sexual minorities are at greater risk for trauma exposure, mental health problems, and substance use. To date, few studies have examined racial/ethnic differences among sexual minorities in relation to health-related behaviors and outcomes. Furthermore, studies of racial/ethnic differences among young adult sexual minority women (SMW) are virtually nonexistent. The current study adds to the previous literature by exploring differences in trauma exposure, sexual identity, mental health, and substance use in a nonprobability national sample of young adult SMW. A total of 967 self- identified lesbian and bisexual women were recruited via the Internet using social networking sites to participate in a larger longitudinal study on young women's health behaviors. The present study included 730 (76%) White, 108 (10%) African American, 91 (9%) Latina, and 38 (4%) Asian women ages 18 to 25 years. Results revealed differences in socioeconomic variables, degree of outness to family, childhood sexual assault, and forcible rape, but not overall lifetime trauma exposure. Among mental health and health-related behavior variables, few differences between groups emerged. Our findings indicate that both researchers and clinicians should turn their attention to processes of resilience among young SMW, particularly young SMW of color. SN - 1099-9809 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25642782/Racial/ethnic_differences_in_identity_and_mental_health_outcomes_among_young_sexual_minority_women_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/cdp/21/3/380 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -