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Natural history of snoring and other sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) symptoms in 7-year-old New Zealand children: a follow-up from age 3.
Sleep Breath. 2015 Sep; 19(3):977-85.SB

Abstract

PURPOSE

We aimed to examine the natural history of snoring and associated symptoms in a community sample of New Zealand children at ages 3 and 7 years, and identify factors associated with habitual snoring at age 7 years.

METHODS

Parent/s of children (n = 839) who completed the community survey about their child's sleep and breathing at age 3 years were re-contacted via mail 4 years later when children were aged 7 years. Parents were asked to complete a follow-up questionnaire which included items relating to their child's sleep and health, and family demographic information. There was a 54.8% (n = 460) response rate.

RESULTS

At follow-up, habitual snoring was prevalent in 9.2% of the sample, similar to the 11.3% reported at age 3 years. However, habitual snoring status changed over time; 36.2% (n = 21/58) remained habitual snorers; 63.8% (n = 37/58) were no longer snoring habitually, while 5.3% (n = 21/397) had started habitual snoring since the initial survey. Overall, the reported severity of SDB-related symptoms decreased over time, regardless of initial habitual snoring status. Nonetheless, habitual snoring at follow-up was significantly associated with mouth breathing, sleeping with the neck extended, sweating profusely, night waking, and parent-reported child irritability.

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings highlight the dynamic nature of SDB, where habitual snoring and related symptoms can develop, remain present, or resolve at different times, over early-mid-childhood years. Given the dynamic nature of habitual snoring over the early childhood years, pediatricians should continue to screen for snoring and sleep apnea on an annual basis throughout childhood.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Women's and Children's Health, University of Otago, P.O. Box 56, Dunedin, 9054, New Zealand.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25643762

Citation

Luo, Rebekah, et al. "Natural History of Snoring and Other Sleep-disordered Breathing (SDB) Symptoms in 7-year-old New Zealand Children: a Follow-up From Age 3." Sleep & Breathing = Schlaf & Atmung, vol. 19, no. 3, 2015, pp. 977-85.
Luo R, Schaughency E, Gill AI, et al. Natural history of snoring and other sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) symptoms in 7-year-old New Zealand children: a follow-up from age 3. Sleep Breath. 2015;19(3):977-85.
Luo, R., Schaughency, E., Gill, A. I., Dawes, P. J., & Galland, B. C. (2015). Natural history of snoring and other sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) symptoms in 7-year-old New Zealand children: a follow-up from age 3. Sleep & Breathing = Schlaf & Atmung, 19(3), 977-85. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11325-014-1113-7
Luo R, et al. Natural History of Snoring and Other Sleep-disordered Breathing (SDB) Symptoms in 7-year-old New Zealand Children: a Follow-up From Age 3. Sleep Breath. 2015;19(3):977-85. PubMed PMID: 25643762.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Natural history of snoring and other sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) symptoms in 7-year-old New Zealand children: a follow-up from age 3. AU - Luo,Rebekah, AU - Schaughency,Elizabeth, AU - Gill,Amelia I, AU - Dawes,Patrick J D, AU - Galland,Barbara C, Y1 - 2015/02/03/ PY - 2014/08/15/received PY - 2014/12/23/accepted PY - 2014/11/05/revised PY - 2015/2/4/entrez PY - 2015/2/4/pubmed PY - 2016/8/9/medline SP - 977 EP - 85 JF - Sleep & breathing = Schlaf & Atmung JO - Sleep Breath VL - 19 IS - 3 N2 - PURPOSE: We aimed to examine the natural history of snoring and associated symptoms in a community sample of New Zealand children at ages 3 and 7 years, and identify factors associated with habitual snoring at age 7 years. METHODS: Parent/s of children (n = 839) who completed the community survey about their child's sleep and breathing at age 3 years were re-contacted via mail 4 years later when children were aged 7 years. Parents were asked to complete a follow-up questionnaire which included items relating to their child's sleep and health, and family demographic information. There was a 54.8% (n = 460) response rate. RESULTS: At follow-up, habitual snoring was prevalent in 9.2% of the sample, similar to the 11.3% reported at age 3 years. However, habitual snoring status changed over time; 36.2% (n = 21/58) remained habitual snorers; 63.8% (n = 37/58) were no longer snoring habitually, while 5.3% (n = 21/397) had started habitual snoring since the initial survey. Overall, the reported severity of SDB-related symptoms decreased over time, regardless of initial habitual snoring status. Nonetheless, habitual snoring at follow-up was significantly associated with mouth breathing, sleeping with the neck extended, sweating profusely, night waking, and parent-reported child irritability. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings highlight the dynamic nature of SDB, where habitual snoring and related symptoms can develop, remain present, or resolve at different times, over early-mid-childhood years. Given the dynamic nature of habitual snoring over the early childhood years, pediatricians should continue to screen for snoring and sleep apnea on an annual basis throughout childhood. SN - 1522-1709 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25643762/Natural_history_of_snoring_and_other_sleep_disordered_breathing__SDB__symptoms_in_7_year_old_New_Zealand_children:_a_follow_up_from_age_3_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11325-014-1113-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -