Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Future water quality monitoring--adapting tools to deal with mixtures of pollutants in water resource management.
Sci Total Environ. 2015 Apr 15; 512-513:540-551.ST

Abstract

Environmental quality monitoring of water resources is challenged with providing the basis for safeguarding the environment against adverse biological effects of anthropogenic chemical contamination from diffuse and point sources. While current regulatory efforts focus on monitoring and assessing a few legacy chemicals, many more anthropogenic chemicals can be detected simultaneously in our aquatic resources. However, exposure to chemical mixtures does not necessarily translate into adverse biological effects nor clearly shows whether mitigation measures are needed. Thus, the question which mixtures are present and which have associated combined effects becomes central for defining adequate monitoring and assessment strategies. Here we describe the vision of the international, EU-funded project SOLUTIONS, where three routes are explored to link the occurrence of chemical mixtures at specific sites to the assessment of adverse biological combination effects. First of all, multi-residue target and non-target screening techniques covering a broader range of anticipated chemicals co-occurring in the environment are being developed. By improving sensitivity and detection limits for known bioactive compounds of concern, new analytical chemistry data for multiple components can be obtained and used to characterise priority mixtures. This information on chemical occurrence will be used to predict mixture toxicity and to derive combined effect estimates suitable for advancing environmental quality standards. Secondly, bioanalytical tools will be explored to provide aggregate bioactivity measures integrating all components that produce common (adverse) outcomes even for mixtures of varying compositions. The ambition is to provide comprehensive arrays of effect-based tools and trait-based field observations that link multiple chemical exposures to various environmental protection goals more directly and to provide improved in situ observations for impact assessment of mixtures. Thirdly, effect-directed analysis (EDA) will be applied to identify major drivers of mixture toxicity. Refinements of EDA include the use of statistical approaches with monitoring information for guidance of experimental EDA studies. These three approaches will be explored using case studies at the Danube and Rhine river basins as well as rivers of the Iberian Peninsula. The synthesis of findings will be organised to provide guidance for future solution-oriented environmental monitoring and explore more systematic ways to assess mixture exposures and combination effects in future water quality monitoring.

Authors+Show Affiliations

UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany; RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany.Institut National de l'Environnement Industriel et des Risques INERIS, BP2, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte, France.Centre for Computational Biology and Modelling, University of Liverpool, L69 7ZB, UK.Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Carl Skottbergs Gata 22b, 40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.Water and Soil Quality Research Group, Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona, Spain.RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany.Institut National de l'Environnement Industriel et des Risques INERIS, BP2, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte, France.UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany.School of Biosciences, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK.Water and Soil Quality Research Group, Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona, Spain.University of Campinas, Limeira, Brazil.National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany.Centre for Computational Biology and Modelling, University of Liverpool, L69 7ZB, UK.Faust & Backhaus Environmental Consulting, Fahrenheitstr. 1, 28359 Bremen, Germany.Alterra, Wageningen University and Research Centre, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands.Masaryk University, Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Kamenice 753/5, 625 00 Brno, Czech Republic.Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Dübendorf, Switzerland.RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany.Synchem UG & Co. KG, Am Kies 2, 34587 Felsberg-Altenburg, Germany.UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany.Brunel University, Institute of Environment, Health and Societies, Uxbridge UB8 3PH, United Kingdom.UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany.WatchFrog, Bâtiment Genavenir 3, 1 rue Pierre Fontaine, 91000 Evry, France.IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, P.O. Box 53021, 400 14 Göteborg, Sweden.Leibniz Institute of Plant Biochemistry, Weinberg 3, 06120 Halle, Germany.Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Dübendorf, Switzerland.Brunel University, Institute of Environment, Health and Societies, Uxbridge UB8 3PH, United Kingdom.University of Bern, Centre for Fish and Wildlife Health, PO Box 8466, CH-3001 Bern, Switzerland.Environmental Institute, Okruzna 784/42, 97241 Kos, Slovak Republic.Masaryk University, Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Kamenice 753/5, 625 00 Brno, Czech Republic.Brunel University, Institute of Environment, Health and Societies, Uxbridge UB8 3PH, United Kingdom.University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Sciences¸ Trg Dositeja Obradovića, 321000 Novi Sad, Serbia.WatchFrog, Bâtiment Genavenir 3, 1 rue Pierre Fontaine, 91000 Evry, France.Norwegian Institute for Water Research NIVA, Gaustadalléen 21, N-0349 Oslo, Norway.MAXX Mess- und Probenahmetechnik GmbH, Hechinger Straβe 41, D-72414 Rangendingen, Germany.School of Biosciences, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK.Alterra, Wageningen University and Research Centre, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands.Foundation Deltares, Potbus 177, 277 MH Delft, The Netherlands.Masaryk University, Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Kamenice 753/5, 625 00 Brno, Czech Republic.State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control & Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Collaborative Innovation Center for Regional Environmental Quality, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023, PR China.UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25644849

Citation

Altenburger, Rolf, et al. "Future Water Quality Monitoring--adapting Tools to Deal With Mixtures of Pollutants in Water Resource Management." The Science of the Total Environment, vol. 512-513, 2015, pp. 540-551.
Altenburger R, Ait-Aissa S, Antczak P, et al. Future water quality monitoring--adapting tools to deal with mixtures of pollutants in water resource management. Sci Total Environ. 2015;512-513:540-551.
Altenburger, R., Ait-Aissa, S., Antczak, P., Backhaus, T., Barceló, D., Seiler, T. B., Brion, F., Busch, W., Chipman, K., de Alda, M. L., de Aragão Umbuzeiro, G., Escher, B. I., Falciani, F., Faust, M., Focks, A., Hilscherova, K., Hollender, J., Hollert, H., Jäger, F., ... Brack, W. (2015). Future water quality monitoring--adapting tools to deal with mixtures of pollutants in water resource management. The Science of the Total Environment, 512-513, 540-551. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2014.12.057
Altenburger R, et al. Future Water Quality Monitoring--adapting Tools to Deal With Mixtures of Pollutants in Water Resource Management. Sci Total Environ. 2015 Apr 15;512-513:540-551. PubMed PMID: 25644849.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Future water quality monitoring--adapting tools to deal with mixtures of pollutants in water resource management. AU - Altenburger,Rolf, AU - Ait-Aissa,Selim, AU - Antczak,Philipp, AU - Backhaus,Thomas, AU - Barceló,Damià, AU - Seiler,Thomas-Benjamin, AU - Brion,Francois, AU - Busch,Wibke, AU - Chipman,Kevin, AU - de Alda,Miren López, AU - de Aragão Umbuzeiro,Gisela, AU - Escher,Beate I, AU - Falciani,Francesco, AU - Faust,Michael, AU - Focks,Andreas, AU - Hilscherova,Klara, AU - Hollender,Juliane, AU - Hollert,Henner, AU - Jäger,Felix, AU - Jahnke,Annika, AU - Kortenkamp,Andreas, AU - Krauss,Martin, AU - Lemkine,Gregory F, AU - Munthe,John, AU - Neumann,Steffen, AU - Schymanski,Emma L, AU - Scrimshaw,Mark, AU - Segner,Helmut, AU - Slobodnik,Jaroslav, AU - Smedes,Foppe, AU - Kughathas,Subramaniam, AU - Teodorovic,Ivana, AU - Tindall,Andrew J, AU - Tollefsen,Knut Erik, AU - Walz,Karl-Heinz, AU - Williams,Tim D, AU - Van den Brink,Paul J, AU - van Gils,Jos, AU - Vrana,Branislav, AU - Zhang,Xiaowei, AU - Brack,Werner, Y1 - 2015/01/31/ PY - 2014/10/15/received PY - 2014/12/18/revised PY - 2014/12/18/accepted PY - 2015/2/4/entrez PY - 2015/2/4/pubmed PY - 2015/9/1/medline KW - Chemical status KW - Ecological status KW - Effect-based tools KW - Mixture toxicity KW - Priority chemicals KW - WFD KW - Water quality SP - 540 EP - 551 JF - The Science of the total environment JO - Sci. Total Environ. VL - 512-513 N2 - Environmental quality monitoring of water resources is challenged with providing the basis for safeguarding the environment against adverse biological effects of anthropogenic chemical contamination from diffuse and point sources. While current regulatory efforts focus on monitoring and assessing a few legacy chemicals, many more anthropogenic chemicals can be detected simultaneously in our aquatic resources. However, exposure to chemical mixtures does not necessarily translate into adverse biological effects nor clearly shows whether mitigation measures are needed. Thus, the question which mixtures are present and which have associated combined effects becomes central for defining adequate monitoring and assessment strategies. Here we describe the vision of the international, EU-funded project SOLUTIONS, where three routes are explored to link the occurrence of chemical mixtures at specific sites to the assessment of adverse biological combination effects. First of all, multi-residue target and non-target screening techniques covering a broader range of anticipated chemicals co-occurring in the environment are being developed. By improving sensitivity and detection limits for known bioactive compounds of concern, new analytical chemistry data for multiple components can be obtained and used to characterise priority mixtures. This information on chemical occurrence will be used to predict mixture toxicity and to derive combined effect estimates suitable for advancing environmental quality standards. Secondly, bioanalytical tools will be explored to provide aggregate bioactivity measures integrating all components that produce common (adverse) outcomes even for mixtures of varying compositions. The ambition is to provide comprehensive arrays of effect-based tools and trait-based field observations that link multiple chemical exposures to various environmental protection goals more directly and to provide improved in situ observations for impact assessment of mixtures. Thirdly, effect-directed analysis (EDA) will be applied to identify major drivers of mixture toxicity. Refinements of EDA include the use of statistical approaches with monitoring information for guidance of experimental EDA studies. These three approaches will be explored using case studies at the Danube and Rhine river basins as well as rivers of the Iberian Peninsula. The synthesis of findings will be organised to provide guidance for future solution-oriented environmental monitoring and explore more systematic ways to assess mixture exposures and combination effects in future water quality monitoring. SN - 1879-1026 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25644849/Future_water_quality_monitoring__adapting_tools_to_deal_with_mixtures_of_pollutants_in_water_resource_management_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0048-9697(14)01759-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -