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Fish intake and risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in 2 large US cohorts.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2015 Feb; 101(2):354-61.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Despite mechanistic data that linked fish and omega-3 (n-3) PUFAs with lower risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), epidemiologic data remain scarce. Fish and n-3 PUFAs are an important component of the prudent dietary pattern that is thought to be protective in the onset of COPD.

OBJECTIVE

We examined the role of fish and PUFA intakes on risk of developing COPD while taking into account the overall dietary pattern.

DESIGN

We investigated the objective in 120,175 women and men from the Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. Over the study period (1984-2000), there were 889 cases of newly diagnosed COPD. Cumulative average intakes of fish, eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, n-3 PUFAs, n-6 PUFAs, and the n-3:n-6 ratio were calculated from repeated food-frequency questionnaires. Because fish is a food group included in the prudent pattern, we derived a new prudent pattern without the contribution from fish, and we termed this pattern the "modified prudent" pattern. We performed multivariable Cox proportional hazards models.

RESULTS

Before the dietary pattern was taken into account, and with 14 factors controlled for, we showed that more-frequent fish intake (≥4 servings/wk) was inversely associated with risk of COPD [adjusted pooled HR for the highest intake compared with the lowest intake (<1 serving/wk): 0.71; 95% CI: 0.54, 0.94]. After additional adjustment for the dietary pattern (modified prudent and Western patterns), the association was NS (0.84; 95% CI: 0.63, 1.13). No significant associations were shown between PUFA intakes and risk of COPD.

CONCLUSION

Although COPD-prevention efforts should continue to focus on smoking cessation, these prospective findings support the importance of promoting a healthy diet in multi-interventional programs to prevent COPD instead of focusing on changes in an isolated food or nutrient.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Respiratory and Environmental Epidemiology team, Villejuif, France (RV); the Université Paris-Sud 11, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France (RV); the Division of General Medicine, Departments of Medicine and of Epidemiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (RGB); the Departments of Nutrition (WCW) and Epidemiology (WCW and CAC), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; the Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (WCW, FES, and CAC); and the Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (CAC).From the Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Respiratory and Environmental Epidemiology team, Villejuif, France (RV); the Université Paris-Sud 11, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France (RV); the Division of General Medicine, Departments of Medicine and of Epidemiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (RGB); the Departments of Nutrition (WCW) and Epidemiology (WCW and CAC), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; the Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (WCW, FES, and CAC); and the Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (CAC).From the Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Respiratory and Environmental Epidemiology team, Villejuif, France (RV); the Université Paris-Sud 11, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France (RV); the Division of General Medicine, Departments of Medicine and of Epidemiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (RGB); the Departments of Nutrition (WCW) and Epidemiology (WCW and CAC), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; the Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (WCW, FES, and CAC); and the Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (CAC).From the Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Respiratory and Environmental Epidemiology team, Villejuif, France (RV); the Université Paris-Sud 11, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France (RV); the Division of General Medicine, Departments of Medicine and of Epidemiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (RGB); the Departments of Nutrition (WCW) and Epidemiology (WCW and CAC), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; the Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (WCW, FES, and CAC); and the Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (CAC).From the Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Respiratory and Environmental Epidemiology team, Villejuif, France (RV); the Université Paris-Sud 11, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France (RV); the Division of General Medicine, Departments of Medicine and of Epidemiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (RGB); the Departments of Nutrition (WCW) and Epidemiology (WCW and CAC), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; the Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (WCW, FES, and CAC); and the Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (CAC).

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25646333

Citation

Varraso, Raphaëlle, et al. "Fish Intake and Risk of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in 2 Large US Cohorts." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 101, no. 2, 2015, pp. 354-61.
Varraso R, Barr RG, Willett WC, et al. Fish intake and risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in 2 large US cohorts. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;101(2):354-61.
Varraso, R., Barr, R. G., Willett, W. C., Speizer, F. E., & Camargo, C. A. (2015). Fish intake and risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in 2 large US cohorts. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 101(2), 354-61. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.114.094516
Varraso R, et al. Fish Intake and Risk of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in 2 Large US Cohorts. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;101(2):354-61. PubMed PMID: 25646333.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fish intake and risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in 2 large US cohorts. AU - Varraso,Raphaëlle, AU - Barr,R Graham, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Speizer,Frank E, AU - Camargo,Carlos A,Jr Y1 - 2014/11/26/ PY - 2015/2/4/entrez PY - 2015/2/4/pubmed PY - 2015/3/21/medline KW - diet KW - dietary patterns KW - epidemiology KW - fish KW - respiratory diseases SP - 354 EP - 61 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 101 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Despite mechanistic data that linked fish and omega-3 (n-3) PUFAs with lower risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), epidemiologic data remain scarce. Fish and n-3 PUFAs are an important component of the prudent dietary pattern that is thought to be protective in the onset of COPD. OBJECTIVE: We examined the role of fish and PUFA intakes on risk of developing COPD while taking into account the overall dietary pattern. DESIGN: We investigated the objective in 120,175 women and men from the Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. Over the study period (1984-2000), there were 889 cases of newly diagnosed COPD. Cumulative average intakes of fish, eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, n-3 PUFAs, n-6 PUFAs, and the n-3:n-6 ratio were calculated from repeated food-frequency questionnaires. Because fish is a food group included in the prudent pattern, we derived a new prudent pattern without the contribution from fish, and we termed this pattern the "modified prudent" pattern. We performed multivariable Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS: Before the dietary pattern was taken into account, and with 14 factors controlled for, we showed that more-frequent fish intake (≥4 servings/wk) was inversely associated with risk of COPD [adjusted pooled HR for the highest intake compared with the lowest intake (<1 serving/wk): 0.71; 95% CI: 0.54, 0.94]. After additional adjustment for the dietary pattern (modified prudent and Western patterns), the association was NS (0.84; 95% CI: 0.63, 1.13). No significant associations were shown between PUFA intakes and risk of COPD. CONCLUSION: Although COPD-prevention efforts should continue to focus on smoking cessation, these prospective findings support the importance of promoting a healthy diet in multi-interventional programs to prevent COPD instead of focusing on changes in an isolated food or nutrient. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25646333/Fish_intake_and_risk_of_chronic_obstructive_pulmonary_disease_in_2_large_US_cohorts_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.114.094516 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -