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Nut consumption and risk of mortality in the Physicians' Health Study.
Am J Clin Nutr 2015; 101(2):407-12AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Previous studies have suggested that nut consumption is associated with beneficial cardiovascular outcomes. However, limited data are available on the association between nut intake and all-cause mortality.

OBJECTIVE

Our aim was to test the hypothesis that nut consumption is inversely associated with the risk of all-cause mortality.

DESIGN

In this prospective cohort study in 20,742 male physicians, we assessed nut intake between 1999 and 2002 via a food-frequency questionnaire and ascertained deaths through an endpoint committee. We used Cox regression to estimate multivariable-adjusted HRs for death according to nut consumption. In secondary analyses, we evaluated associations of nut consumption with cause-specific mortality.

RESULTS

During a mean follow-up of 9.6 y, there were 2732 deaths. The mean (±SD) age at baseline was 66.6 ± 9.3 y. Median nut consumption was 1 serving/wk. Multivariable-adjusted HRs (95% CIs) were 1.0 (reference), 0.92 (0.83, 1.01), 0.85 (0.76, 0.96), 0.86 (0.75, 0.98), and 0.74 (0.63, 0.87) for nut consumption of never or <1 serving/mo, 1-3 servings/mo, 1 serving/wk, 2-4 servings/wk, and ≥5 servings/wk, respectively (P-linear trend < 0.0001), after adjustment for age, body mass index, alcohol use, smoking, exercise, prevalent diabetes and hypertension, and intakes of energy, saturated fat, fruit and vegetables, and red meat. In a secondary analysis, results were consistent for cardiovascular disease mortality but only suggestive and non-statistically significant for coronary artery disease and cancer mortality.

CONCLUSION

Our data are consistent with an inverse association between nut consumption and the risk of all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality in US male physicians.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the Divisions of Aging (TTH, ABP, JMG, and LD) and Preventive Medicine (JMG), Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; the Aging Brain Center, Institute for Aging Research, Hebrew SeniorLife, Boston, MA (TTH); and the Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology and Research Information Center (MAVERIC), Geriatric Research (GRECC) and VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA (JMG and LD).From the Divisions of Aging (TTH, ABP, JMG, and LD) and Preventive Medicine (JMG), Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; the Aging Brain Center, Institute for Aging Research, Hebrew SeniorLife, Boston, MA (TTH); and the Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology and Research Information Center (MAVERIC), Geriatric Research (GRECC) and VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA (JMG and LD).From the Divisions of Aging (TTH, ABP, JMG, and LD) and Preventive Medicine (JMG), Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; the Aging Brain Center, Institute for Aging Research, Hebrew SeniorLife, Boston, MA (TTH); and the Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology and Research Information Center (MAVERIC), Geriatric Research (GRECC) and VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA (JMG and LD).From the Divisions of Aging (TTH, ABP, JMG, and LD) and Preventive Medicine (JMG), Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; the Aging Brain Center, Institute for Aging Research, Hebrew SeniorLife, Boston, MA (TTH); and the Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology and Research Information Center (MAVERIC), Geriatric Research (GRECC) and VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA (JMG and LD).

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25646339

Citation

Hshieh, Tammy T., et al. "Nut Consumption and Risk of Mortality in the Physicians' Health Study." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 101, no. 2, 2015, pp. 407-12.
Hshieh TT, Petrone AB, Gaziano JM, et al. Nut consumption and risk of mortality in the Physicians' Health Study. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;101(2):407-12.
Hshieh, T. T., Petrone, A. B., Gaziano, J. M., & Djoussé, L. (2015). Nut consumption and risk of mortality in the Physicians' Health Study. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 101(2), pp. 407-12. doi:10.3945/ajcn.114.099846.
Hshieh TT, et al. Nut Consumption and Risk of Mortality in the Physicians' Health Study. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;101(2):407-12. PubMed PMID: 25646339.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nut consumption and risk of mortality in the Physicians' Health Study. AU - Hshieh,Tammy T, AU - Petrone,Andrew B, AU - Gaziano,J Michael, AU - Djoussé,Luc, Y1 - 2014/12/17/ PY - 2015/2/4/entrez PY - 2015/2/4/pubmed PY - 2015/3/21/medline KW - cardiovascular disease KW - coronary artery disease KW - mortality KW - nut consumption KW - nuts SP - 407 EP - 12 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 101 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Previous studies have suggested that nut consumption is associated with beneficial cardiovascular outcomes. However, limited data are available on the association between nut intake and all-cause mortality. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to test the hypothesis that nut consumption is inversely associated with the risk of all-cause mortality. DESIGN: In this prospective cohort study in 20,742 male physicians, we assessed nut intake between 1999 and 2002 via a food-frequency questionnaire and ascertained deaths through an endpoint committee. We used Cox regression to estimate multivariable-adjusted HRs for death according to nut consumption. In secondary analyses, we evaluated associations of nut consumption with cause-specific mortality. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 9.6 y, there were 2732 deaths. The mean (±SD) age at baseline was 66.6 ± 9.3 y. Median nut consumption was 1 serving/wk. Multivariable-adjusted HRs (95% CIs) were 1.0 (reference), 0.92 (0.83, 1.01), 0.85 (0.76, 0.96), 0.86 (0.75, 0.98), and 0.74 (0.63, 0.87) for nut consumption of never or <1 serving/mo, 1-3 servings/mo, 1 serving/wk, 2-4 servings/wk, and ≥5 servings/wk, respectively (P-linear trend < 0.0001), after adjustment for age, body mass index, alcohol use, smoking, exercise, prevalent diabetes and hypertension, and intakes of energy, saturated fat, fruit and vegetables, and red meat. In a secondary analysis, results were consistent for cardiovascular disease mortality but only suggestive and non-statistically significant for coronary artery disease and cancer mortality. CONCLUSION: Our data are consistent with an inverse association between nut consumption and the risk of all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality in US male physicians. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25646339/Nut_consumption_and_risk_of_mortality_in_the_Physicians'_Health_Study_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.114.099846 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -