Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Response to Hepatitis A Vaccination in Immunocompromised Travelers.
J Infect Dis. 2015 Aug 01; 212(3):378-85.JI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Hepatitis A vaccines are highly immunogenic in healthy patients, but there is uncertainty about their immunogenicity in immunocompromised patients.

METHODS

Our study included immunocompromised patients who received 1 or 2 hepatitis A vaccinations between January 2011 and June 2013. We assessed factors that influenced the serologic response to vaccination. We performed a literature review of previous studies on hepatitis A vaccination in immunocompromised patients.

RESULTS

Of 85 immunocompromised patients, 65 used immunosuppressive drugs, 13 had received stem cell transplants, and 7 were infected with human immunodeficiency virus. After vaccination, 65 of 85 (76.5%) developed antibodies. Tumor necrosis factor α blocker use was associated with better serologic responses than other immunosuppressive drugs. Female patients were more compliant than male patients with postvaccination antibody titer measurements. In 11 relevant studies, antibody responses after the first and second vaccination averaged 37% and 82%, respectively. Factors that negatively influenced serologic response rates were high doses of immunosuppressive drugs, fewer hepatitis A vaccinations, and a short interval between vaccination and antibody measurement.

CONCLUSIONS

Immunocompromised patients showed moderate to good serologic responses to hepatitis A vaccination, but may need more time to develop immunity. Tumor necrosis factor α blocker use was associated with better antibody responses than other drugs. Specifically, male patients should be motivated to return for antibody titer measurements.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center of Tropical Medicine and Travel Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases, Division of Internal Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.Center of Tropical Medicine and Travel Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases, Division of Internal Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.Center of Tropical Medicine and Travel Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases, Division of Internal Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.Center of Tropical Medicine and Travel Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases, Division of Internal Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25649170

Citation

Garcia Garrido, Hannah M., et al. "Response to Hepatitis a Vaccination in Immunocompromised Travelers." The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 212, no. 3, 2015, pp. 378-85.
Garcia Garrido HM, Wieten RW, Grobusch MP, et al. Response to Hepatitis A Vaccination in Immunocompromised Travelers. J Infect Dis. 2015;212(3):378-85.
Garcia Garrido, H. M., Wieten, R. W., Grobusch, M. P., & Goorhuis, A. (2015). Response to Hepatitis A Vaccination in Immunocompromised Travelers. The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 212(3), 378-85. https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiv060
Garcia Garrido HM, et al. Response to Hepatitis a Vaccination in Immunocompromised Travelers. J Infect Dis. 2015 Aug 1;212(3):378-85. PubMed PMID: 25649170.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Response to Hepatitis A Vaccination in Immunocompromised Travelers. AU - Garcia Garrido,Hannah M, AU - Wieten,Rosanne W, AU - Grobusch,Martin P, AU - Goorhuis,Abraham, Y1 - 2015/02/03/ PY - 2014/10/09/received PY - 2015/01/26/accepted PY - 2015/2/5/entrez PY - 2015/2/5/pubmed PY - 2015/10/10/medline KW - hepatitis A vaccination KW - immunocompromised KW - serologic response KW - travelers SP - 378 EP - 85 JF - The Journal of infectious diseases JO - J. Infect. Dis. VL - 212 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Hepatitis A vaccines are highly immunogenic in healthy patients, but there is uncertainty about their immunogenicity in immunocompromised patients. METHODS: Our study included immunocompromised patients who received 1 or 2 hepatitis A vaccinations between January 2011 and June 2013. We assessed factors that influenced the serologic response to vaccination. We performed a literature review of previous studies on hepatitis A vaccination in immunocompromised patients. RESULTS: Of 85 immunocompromised patients, 65 used immunosuppressive drugs, 13 had received stem cell transplants, and 7 were infected with human immunodeficiency virus. After vaccination, 65 of 85 (76.5%) developed antibodies. Tumor necrosis factor α blocker use was associated with better serologic responses than other immunosuppressive drugs. Female patients were more compliant than male patients with postvaccination antibody titer measurements. In 11 relevant studies, antibody responses after the first and second vaccination averaged 37% and 82%, respectively. Factors that negatively influenced serologic response rates were high doses of immunosuppressive drugs, fewer hepatitis A vaccinations, and a short interval between vaccination and antibody measurement. CONCLUSIONS: Immunocompromised patients showed moderate to good serologic responses to hepatitis A vaccination, but may need more time to develop immunity. Tumor necrosis factor α blocker use was associated with better antibody responses than other drugs. Specifically, male patients should be motivated to return for antibody titer measurements. SN - 1537-6613 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25649170/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jid/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/infdis/jiv060 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -