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Relationships between chronotypes and affective temperaments in healthy young adults.
J Affect Disord. 2015 Apr 01; 175:256-9.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Chronotype, an individual׳s preferred time for activity and sleep, has been known to be associated with affective disorders. Affective temperaments may be subclinical manifestations that represent a biological diathesis for affective disorders. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the relationships between circadian preferences and affective temperaments.

METHODS

Six hundred and forty one healthy young adults (376 male, 265 female) completed the Korean Translation of Composite Scale of Morningness to measure diurnal preferences and the Temperament Scale of Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego - Autoquestionnaire (TEMPS-A) to measure cyclothymic, depressive, hyperthymic, irritable, and anxious affective temperaments. Multivariate analyses of covariance were computed with the five affective temperaments as dependent variables, chronotype and gender as an independent variable, and age as a covariate.

RESULTS

One hundred and sixteen subjects were classified as having morning-type (18.1%), 402 as intermediate-type (62.7%), and 123 as evening-type (19.2%) circadian preferences. Evening-type was significantly associated with greater depressive, cyclothymic, irritable, and anxious temperaments, while morning-type was significantly associated with hyperthymic temperament.

LIMITATIONS

The present study only used self-report questionnaires to measure diurnal preference.

CONCLUSIONS

Evening-type subjects were more likely to have depressive, cyclothymic, irritable and anxious temperaments, whereas morning-types were more likely to have hyperthymic temperament. This relationship between chronotype and affective temperament might be important for vulnerability to affective disorders.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea; Institute of Behavioral Science in Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.Department of Psychiatry, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea; Institute of Behavioral Science in Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.Department of Psychiatry, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea; Institute of Behavioral Science in Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.Department of Psychiatry, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea; Institute of Behavioral Science in Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.Department of Psychiatry, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea; Institute of Behavioral Science in Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.Department of Psychiatry, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea; Institute of Behavioral Science in Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea. Electronic address: jeeinkang@yuhs.ac.Department of Psychiatry, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea; Institute of Behavioral Science in Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea. Electronic address: kimsejoo@yuhs.ac.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25658501

Citation

Park, Chun Il, et al. "Relationships Between Chronotypes and Affective Temperaments in Healthy Young Adults." Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 175, 2015, pp. 256-9.
Park CI, An SK, Kim HW, et al. Relationships between chronotypes and affective temperaments in healthy young adults. J Affect Disord. 2015;175:256-9.
Park, C. I., An, S. K., Kim, H. W., Koh, M. J., Namkoong, K., Kang, J. I., & Kim, S. J. (2015). Relationships between chronotypes and affective temperaments in healthy young adults. Journal of Affective Disorders, 175, 256-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2015.01.004
Park CI, et al. Relationships Between Chronotypes and Affective Temperaments in Healthy Young Adults. J Affect Disord. 2015 Apr 1;175:256-9. PubMed PMID: 25658501.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relationships between chronotypes and affective temperaments in healthy young adults. AU - Park,Chun Il, AU - An,Suk Kyoon, AU - Kim,Hae Won, AU - Koh,Min Jung, AU - Namkoong,Kee, AU - Kang,Jee In, AU - Kim,Se Joo, Y1 - 2015/01/15/ PY - 2014/10/10/received PY - 2015/01/08/revised PY - 2015/01/08/accepted PY - 2015/2/7/entrez PY - 2015/2/7/pubmed PY - 2015/8/27/medline KW - Affective temperaments KW - Chronotype KW - Evening-type KW - Morning-type KW - TEMPS-A SP - 256 EP - 9 JF - Journal of affective disorders JO - J Affect Disord VL - 175 N2 - BACKGROUND: Chronotype, an individual׳s preferred time for activity and sleep, has been known to be associated with affective disorders. Affective temperaments may be subclinical manifestations that represent a biological diathesis for affective disorders. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the relationships between circadian preferences and affective temperaments. METHODS: Six hundred and forty one healthy young adults (376 male, 265 female) completed the Korean Translation of Composite Scale of Morningness to measure diurnal preferences and the Temperament Scale of Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego - Autoquestionnaire (TEMPS-A) to measure cyclothymic, depressive, hyperthymic, irritable, and anxious affective temperaments. Multivariate analyses of covariance were computed with the five affective temperaments as dependent variables, chronotype and gender as an independent variable, and age as a covariate. RESULTS: One hundred and sixteen subjects were classified as having morning-type (18.1%), 402 as intermediate-type (62.7%), and 123 as evening-type (19.2%) circadian preferences. Evening-type was significantly associated with greater depressive, cyclothymic, irritable, and anxious temperaments, while morning-type was significantly associated with hyperthymic temperament. LIMITATIONS: The present study only used self-report questionnaires to measure diurnal preference. CONCLUSIONS: Evening-type subjects were more likely to have depressive, cyclothymic, irritable and anxious temperaments, whereas morning-types were more likely to have hyperthymic temperament. This relationship between chronotype and affective temperament might be important for vulnerability to affective disorders. SN - 1573-2517 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25658501/Relationships_between_chronotypes_and_affective_temperaments_in_healthy_young_adults_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165-0327(15)00008-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -