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Refining measures of alcohol problems for general population surveys.
Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2015; 39(2):363-70AC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

There is a need to improve classification of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) in general population surveys. We developed and tested follow-up questions for 2 commonly reported symptom domains (withdrawal and larger/longer) to assess effects on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-5 AUD classification.

METHODS

Telephone interviews recontacted a selective follow-up sample of respondents under age 46 from the 2010 National Alcohol Survey with at least 1 lifetime AUD symptom (n = 244). Items included detailed questions about past-year AUD symptoms. Three items (vomiting, sweating, irritability) were recoded as acute intoxication rather than withdrawal if they most recently occurred within 8 hours of stopping drinking. The larger/longer criterion was recoded as socially motivated if respondents endorsed "got caught up in drinking with a group of friends" and not "feel compelled to drink and just can't stop" as a reason for drinking more than intended.

RESULTS

Of 225 current drinkers, 11% reported past-year withdrawal, with 28% of those reporting acute intoxication instead of physical withdrawal. Adjusting past-year withdrawal classification reduced AUD prevalence by 6%. A minority (12%) reported the past-year larger/longer criterion. Of those, 50% indicated social reasons for drinking more than intended, rather than compulsion to drink. Adjusting the past-year larger/longer criterion reduced AUD prevalence by 8%. Accounting for both adjustments reduced AUD prevalence by 13%. Cases that met AUD criteria after both adjustments were substantially heavier drinkers than those that were reclassified.

CONCLUSIONS

Follow-up items could be implemented in epidemiologic studies with minimal response burden and may help reduce misclassification of AUD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Alcohol Research Group, Public Health Institute, Emeryville, California.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25664926

Citation

Karriker-Jaffe, Katherine J., et al. "Refining Measures of Alcohol Problems for General Population Surveys." Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 39, no. 2, 2015, pp. 363-70.
Karriker-Jaffe KJ, Witbrodt J, Greenfield TK. Refining measures of alcohol problems for general population surveys. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2015;39(2):363-70.
Karriker-Jaffe, K. J., Witbrodt, J., & Greenfield, T. K. (2015). Refining measures of alcohol problems for general population surveys. Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, 39(2), pp. 363-70. doi:10.1111/acer.12627.
Karriker-Jaffe KJ, Witbrodt J, Greenfield TK. Refining Measures of Alcohol Problems for General Population Surveys. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2015;39(2):363-70. PubMed PMID: 25664926.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Refining measures of alcohol problems for general population surveys. AU - Karriker-Jaffe,Katherine J, AU - Witbrodt,Jane, AU - Greenfield,Thomas K, Y1 - 2015/02/09/ PY - 2013/12/20/received PY - 2014/11/03/accepted PY - 2015/2/10/entrez PY - 2015/2/11/pubmed PY - 2015/11/13/medline KW - Alcohol Use Disorder KW - Measurement KW - Population Surveys SP - 363 EP - 70 JF - Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research JO - Alcohol. Clin. Exp. Res. VL - 39 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: There is a need to improve classification of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) in general population surveys. We developed and tested follow-up questions for 2 commonly reported symptom domains (withdrawal and larger/longer) to assess effects on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-5 AUD classification. METHODS: Telephone interviews recontacted a selective follow-up sample of respondents under age 46 from the 2010 National Alcohol Survey with at least 1 lifetime AUD symptom (n = 244). Items included detailed questions about past-year AUD symptoms. Three items (vomiting, sweating, irritability) were recoded as acute intoxication rather than withdrawal if they most recently occurred within 8 hours of stopping drinking. The larger/longer criterion was recoded as socially motivated if respondents endorsed "got caught up in drinking with a group of friends" and not "feel compelled to drink and just can't stop" as a reason for drinking more than intended. RESULTS: Of 225 current drinkers, 11% reported past-year withdrawal, with 28% of those reporting acute intoxication instead of physical withdrawal. Adjusting past-year withdrawal classification reduced AUD prevalence by 6%. A minority (12%) reported the past-year larger/longer criterion. Of those, 50% indicated social reasons for drinking more than intended, rather than compulsion to drink. Adjusting the past-year larger/longer criterion reduced AUD prevalence by 8%. Accounting for both adjustments reduced AUD prevalence by 13%. Cases that met AUD criteria after both adjustments were substantially heavier drinkers than those that were reclassified. CONCLUSIONS: Follow-up items could be implemented in epidemiologic studies with minimal response burden and may help reduce misclassification of AUD. SN - 1530-0277 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25664926/Refining_measures_of_alcohol_problems_for_general_population_surveys_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/acer.12627 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -