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Snapchat elicits more jealousy than Facebook: a comparison of Snapchat and Facebook use.
Cyberpsychol Behav Soc Netw. 2015 Mar; 18(3):141-6.CB

Abstract

Recent news in the media has suggested that younger people are using popular social media such as Facebook less and are quickly adopting newer media, such as the self-destructing app Snapchat. Snapchat is unique in that it erases messages several seconds after they have been sent, affording its users a higher level of privacy. Yet, little research exists on Snapchat use in general, let alone its broader psychological implications. This article offers a preliminary comparison of Snapchat and Facebook use and psychological effects on romantic jealousy. General motives for using Snapchat and Facebook are examined, as well as the nature of the content that Snapchat users most frequently share. Further, because of the differences in privacy and persistence of information, potential psychological effects in the domain of romantic jealousy are also examined, which has been widely studied on Facebook in the last few years. Findings show that the main difference in motives were that Snapchat was used more for flirting and finding new love interests, whereas Facebook was still the main social networking site used for keeping in touch with friends. Further, when presenting users with a series of potentially jealousy provoking scenarios, Snapchat elicited higher levels of jealousy than did Facebook. These findings are explained based on an affordance approach.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 ERC/Social Media, Knowledge Media Research Center , Tübingen, Germany .No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25667961

Citation

Utz, Sonja, et al. "Snapchat Elicits More Jealousy Than Facebook: a Comparison of Snapchat and Facebook Use." Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking, vol. 18, no. 3, 2015, pp. 141-6.
Utz S, Muscanell N, Khalid C. Snapchat elicits more jealousy than Facebook: a comparison of Snapchat and Facebook use. Cyberpsychol Behav Soc Netw. 2015;18(3):141-6.
Utz, S., Muscanell, N., & Khalid, C. (2015). Snapchat elicits more jealousy than Facebook: a comparison of Snapchat and Facebook use. Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking, 18(3), 141-6. https://doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2014.0479
Utz S, Muscanell N, Khalid C. Snapchat Elicits More Jealousy Than Facebook: a Comparison of Snapchat and Facebook Use. Cyberpsychol Behav Soc Netw. 2015;18(3):141-6. PubMed PMID: 25667961.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Snapchat elicits more jealousy than Facebook: a comparison of Snapchat and Facebook use. AU - Utz,Sonja, AU - Muscanell,Nicole, AU - Khalid,Cameran, Y1 - 2015/02/10/ PY - 2015/2/11/entrez PY - 2015/2/11/pubmed PY - 2015/9/12/medline SP - 141 EP - 6 JF - Cyberpsychology, behavior and social networking JO - Cyberpsychol Behav Soc Netw VL - 18 IS - 3 N2 - Recent news in the media has suggested that younger people are using popular social media such as Facebook less and are quickly adopting newer media, such as the self-destructing app Snapchat. Snapchat is unique in that it erases messages several seconds after they have been sent, affording its users a higher level of privacy. Yet, little research exists on Snapchat use in general, let alone its broader psychological implications. This article offers a preliminary comparison of Snapchat and Facebook use and psychological effects on romantic jealousy. General motives for using Snapchat and Facebook are examined, as well as the nature of the content that Snapchat users most frequently share. Further, because of the differences in privacy and persistence of information, potential psychological effects in the domain of romantic jealousy are also examined, which has been widely studied on Facebook in the last few years. Findings show that the main difference in motives were that Snapchat was used more for flirting and finding new love interests, whereas Facebook was still the main social networking site used for keeping in touch with friends. Further, when presenting users with a series of potentially jealousy provoking scenarios, Snapchat elicited higher levels of jealousy than did Facebook. These findings are explained based on an affordance approach. SN - 2152-2723 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25667961/Snapchat_elicits_more_jealousy_than_facebook:_a_comparison_of_snapchat_and_facebook_use_ L2 - https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/cyber.2014.0479?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -