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Plasma kinetics of an LDL-like non-protein nanoemulsion and transfer of lipids to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease associated with cardiovascular risk, but with normal plasma lipids.

OBJECTIVE

The aim was to investigate low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism in RA patients using radioactive nanoemulsions resembling an LDL lipid structure (LDE) as metabolic probes.

METHODS

Thirty patients with RA, 16 in remission and 14 in high activity, and 30 healthy controls were studied. LDE labeled with (14)C-cholesteryl ester ((14)C-CE) and (3)H-unesterified cholesterol ((3)H-UC) was intravenously injected followed by 24-hour plasma sampling. Fractional clearance rates (FCR, h(-1)) were calculated by compartmental analysis. Lipid transfers to HDL were assayed by incubating plasma samples with a donor nanoemulsion labeled with radioactive lipids; % lipids transferred to HDL were quantified after chemical precipitation.

RESULTS

LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, unesterified cholesterol, and oxidized LDL were equal in RA and controls, and HDL cholesterol was even higher in RA. Compared with controls, apolipoprotein B was lower, apolipoprotein A1 was equal, and apolipoprotein E was higher in RA. Decay curves of LDE labels were faster in RA patients than in controls ((14)C-CE: 0.072 ± 0.066 and 0.038 ± 0.027, P = .0115; (3)H-UC: 0.066 ± 0.042 and 0.035 ± 0.039; P < .0044). FCRs were equal in 2 RA subgroups. Transfer of UC, triglycerides, and phospholipids to HDL was equal between RA and controls, but CE transfer was lower in RA. HDL size was smaller in RA patients than in controls (8.5 ± 0.5 nm; 9.2 ± 0.8 nm, P < .0001).

CONCLUSION

RA patients were more efficient in removing atherogenic LDL from plasma, as indicated by higher CE and UC FCR, with in lower apolipoprotein B. This was unexpected because of the higher cardiovascular risk in RA.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Lipid Metabolism Laboratory, Heart Institute, Medical School Hospital of the University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

    ,

    Lipid Metabolism Laboratory, Heart Institute, Medical School Hospital of the University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address: ramarans@usp.br.

    ,

    Division of Rheumatology, Medical School Hospital of the University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

    ,

    Division of Rheumatology, Medical School Hospital of the University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

    ,

    Division of Rheumatology, Medical School Hospital of the University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

    ,

    Division of Rheumatology, Medical School Hospital of the University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

    Lipid Metabolism Laboratory, Heart Institute, Medical School Hospital of the University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Apolipoproteins B
    Arthritis, Rheumatoid
    Carbon Radioisotopes
    Cholesterol
    Cholesterol Esters
    Cholesterol, HDL
    Cholesterol, LDL
    Emulsions
    Female
    Humans
    Injections, Intravenous
    Kinetics
    Lipids
    Lipoproteins, HDL
    Lipoproteins, LDL
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Nanostructures
    Treatment Outcome
    Triglycerides
    Tritium

    Pub Type(s)

    Controlled Clinical Trial
    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    25670363

    Citation

    Pozzi, Fernanda S., et al. "Plasma Kinetics of an LDL-like Non-protein Nanoemulsion and Transfer of Lipids to High-density Lipoprotein (HDL) in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis." Journal of Clinical Lipidology, vol. 9, no. 1, 2015, pp. 72-80.
    Pozzi FS, Maranhão RC, Guedes LK, et al. Plasma kinetics of an LDL-like non-protein nanoemulsion and transfer of lipids to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. J Clin Lipidol. 2015;9(1):72-80.
    Pozzi, F. S., Maranhão, R. C., Guedes, L. K., Borba, E. F., Laurindo, I. M., Bonfa, E., & Vinagre, C. G. (2015). Plasma kinetics of an LDL-like non-protein nanoemulsion and transfer of lipids to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Journal of Clinical Lipidology, 9(1), pp. 72-80. doi:10.1016/j.jacl.2014.10.004.
    Pozzi FS, et al. Plasma Kinetics of an LDL-like Non-protein Nanoemulsion and Transfer of Lipids to High-density Lipoprotein (HDL) in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis. J Clin Lipidol. 2015;9(1):72-80. PubMed PMID: 25670363.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Plasma kinetics of an LDL-like non-protein nanoemulsion and transfer of lipids to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. AU - Pozzi,Fernanda S, AU - Maranhão,Raul C, AU - Guedes,Lissiane K, AU - Borba,Eduardo F, AU - Laurindo,Ieda M M, AU - Bonfa,Eloisa, AU - Vinagre,Carmen G, Y1 - 2014/11/04/ PY - 2014/02/28/received PY - 2014/10/01/revised PY - 2014/10/09/accepted PY - 2015/2/12/entrez PY - 2015/2/12/pubmed PY - 2015/10/27/medline KW - Cholesterol KW - LDL metabolism KW - Lipoproteins KW - Nanoparticles KW - Rheumatoid arthritis KW - Transfer proteins SP - 72 EP - 80 JF - Journal of clinical lipidology JO - J Clin Lipidol VL - 9 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease associated with cardiovascular risk, but with normal plasma lipids. OBJECTIVE: The aim was to investigate low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism in RA patients using radioactive nanoemulsions resembling an LDL lipid structure (LDE) as metabolic probes. METHODS: Thirty patients with RA, 16 in remission and 14 in high activity, and 30 healthy controls were studied. LDE labeled with (14)C-cholesteryl ester ((14)C-CE) and (3)H-unesterified cholesterol ((3)H-UC) was intravenously injected followed by 24-hour plasma sampling. Fractional clearance rates (FCR, h(-1)) were calculated by compartmental analysis. Lipid transfers to HDL were assayed by incubating plasma samples with a donor nanoemulsion labeled with radioactive lipids; % lipids transferred to HDL were quantified after chemical precipitation. RESULTS: LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, unesterified cholesterol, and oxidized LDL were equal in RA and controls, and HDL cholesterol was even higher in RA. Compared with controls, apolipoprotein B was lower, apolipoprotein A1 was equal, and apolipoprotein E was higher in RA. Decay curves of LDE labels were faster in RA patients than in controls ((14)C-CE: 0.072 ± 0.066 and 0.038 ± 0.027, P = .0115; (3)H-UC: 0.066 ± 0.042 and 0.035 ± 0.039; P < .0044). FCRs were equal in 2 RA subgroups. Transfer of UC, triglycerides, and phospholipids to HDL was equal between RA and controls, but CE transfer was lower in RA. HDL size was smaller in RA patients than in controls (8.5 ± 0.5 nm; 9.2 ± 0.8 nm, P < .0001). CONCLUSION: RA patients were more efficient in removing atherogenic LDL from plasma, as indicated by higher CE and UC FCR, with in lower apolipoprotein B. This was unexpected because of the higher cardiovascular risk in RA. SN - 1933-2874 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25670363/Plasma_kinetics_of_an_LDL_like_non_protein_nanoemulsion_and_transfer_of_lipids_to_high_density_lipoprotein__HDL__in_patients_with_rheumatoid_arthritis_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1933-2874(14)00342-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -