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Investigating key beliefs guiding mothers' dietary decisions for their 2-3 year old.
Appetite. 2015 Jun; 89:167-74.A

Abstract

Currently, there is no research in Australia that systematically investigates the underlying beliefs for mothers' decisions regarding their young child's nutritional needs based on current guidelines. We aimed to determine, using a Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) belief-based approach, key beliefs that guide mothers' decisions with regards to: (a) providing their child with a wide range of foods from the five food groups ('healthy eating'); and (b) limiting their child's intake of 'discretionary choices' (e.g. lollies). Mothers (N = 197, M age = 34.39, SD = 5.65) completed a main questionnaire either online or on hard copy (paper-based), with a 1-week phone follow-up of the target behaviours (N = 161). Correlations and multiple regression analyses were conducted, and a number of key behavioural, normative, and control beliefs emerged for both healthy eating and discretionary choice behaviours. For healthy eating, mothers identified behavioural beliefs 'improving my child's health' and 'resistance from my child'; normative beliefs 'other family members' and 'spouse/partner'; and control beliefs 'child's food preferences'. For discretionary choices, behavioural beliefs 'maintain consistent energy levels in my child' for intentions, and 'give my child their required nutritional intake'; normative beliefs 'spouse/partner', 'healthcare professionals' and 'friends'; and control beliefs 'child's food preferences' were identified. These findings can inform the development of future intervention programmes aimed at modifying mothers' child feeding practices to encourage healthy eating and limit discretionary choice intake and, ultimately, increase the life expectancy of the current generation of children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Applied Psychology, Griffith University, 176 Messines Ridge Road, Mt Gravatt, QLD 4122, Australia. Electronic address: teagan.spinks@griffithuni.edu.au.School of Applied Psychology, Griffith University, 176 Messines Ridge Road, Mt Gravatt, QLD 4122, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25675857

Citation

Spinks, Teagan, and Kyra Hamilton. "Investigating Key Beliefs Guiding Mothers' Dietary Decisions for Their 2-3 Year Old." Appetite, vol. 89, 2015, pp. 167-74.
Spinks T, Hamilton K. Investigating key beliefs guiding mothers' dietary decisions for their 2-3 year old. Appetite. 2015;89:167-74.
Spinks, T., & Hamilton, K. (2015). Investigating key beliefs guiding mothers' dietary decisions for their 2-3 year old. Appetite, 89, 167-74. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2015.02.004
Spinks T, Hamilton K. Investigating Key Beliefs Guiding Mothers' Dietary Decisions for Their 2-3 Year Old. Appetite. 2015;89:167-74. PubMed PMID: 25675857.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Investigating key beliefs guiding mothers' dietary decisions for their 2-3 year old. AU - Spinks,Teagan, AU - Hamilton,Kyra, Y1 - 2015/02/09/ PY - 2014/09/11/received PY - 2015/01/14/revised PY - 2015/02/02/accepted PY - 2015/2/14/entrez PY - 2015/2/14/pubmed PY - 2015/12/15/medline KW - Beliefs KW - Mothers KW - Nutrition KW - Theory of planned behaviour KW - Young children SP - 167 EP - 74 JF - Appetite JO - Appetite VL - 89 N2 - Currently, there is no research in Australia that systematically investigates the underlying beliefs for mothers' decisions regarding their young child's nutritional needs based on current guidelines. We aimed to determine, using a Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) belief-based approach, key beliefs that guide mothers' decisions with regards to: (a) providing their child with a wide range of foods from the five food groups ('healthy eating'); and (b) limiting their child's intake of 'discretionary choices' (e.g. lollies). Mothers (N = 197, M age = 34.39, SD = 5.65) completed a main questionnaire either online or on hard copy (paper-based), with a 1-week phone follow-up of the target behaviours (N = 161). Correlations and multiple regression analyses were conducted, and a number of key behavioural, normative, and control beliefs emerged for both healthy eating and discretionary choice behaviours. For healthy eating, mothers identified behavioural beliefs 'improving my child's health' and 'resistance from my child'; normative beliefs 'other family members' and 'spouse/partner'; and control beliefs 'child's food preferences'. For discretionary choices, behavioural beliefs 'maintain consistent energy levels in my child' for intentions, and 'give my child their required nutritional intake'; normative beliefs 'spouse/partner', 'healthcare professionals' and 'friends'; and control beliefs 'child's food preferences' were identified. These findings can inform the development of future intervention programmes aimed at modifying mothers' child feeding practices to encourage healthy eating and limit discretionary choice intake and, ultimately, increase the life expectancy of the current generation of children. SN - 1095-8304 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25675857/Investigating_key_beliefs_guiding_mothers'_dietary_decisions_for_their_2_3_year_old_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0195-6663(15)00051-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -