Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Association between benign prostatic hyperplasia, body mass index, and metabolic syndrome in Chinese men.
Asian J Androl. 2015 Sep-Oct; 17(5):826-30.AJ

Abstract

Previous studies have showed that men suffering from diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome (MetS) and obesity have a higher risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The present study aimed to examine the association between BPH, obesity, and features of MetS among men of the Hunan area of China. For this cross-sectional study, 904 males (aged 50-59 years) were included. MetS parameters, International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, total prostate volume (TPV), postvoid residual volume (PVR) and maximum urine flow rate (Qmax) were measured. Results showed that MetS was associated with TPV (P = 0.048), PVR (P = 0.004) and IPSS (P = 0.011), but not with other indicators of BPH progression such as PSA levels or Qmax. MetS was associated with the voiding symptoms score (P < 0.05), but not with the storage symptom score. In addition, body mass index and fasting blood glucose positively correlated with TPV (r = 0.416, P< 0.001; and r = 0.310, P= 0.011, respectively). In conclusion, results suggest that MetS is associated with higher prostatic volume, prostate symptom score and voiding symptoms, but not with other features of prostatic hyperplasia such as PSA levels or Qmax. Changes in lifestyle factors, including physical activity and prevention of MetS, might be useful to prevent BPH and its progression, but further studies are needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha 410011, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25677137

Citation

Yin, Zhuo, et al. "Association Between Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia, Body Mass Index, and Metabolic Syndrome in Chinese Men." Asian Journal of Andrology, vol. 17, no. 5, 2015, pp. 826-30.
Yin Z, Yang JR, Rao JM, et al. Association between benign prostatic hyperplasia, body mass index, and metabolic syndrome in Chinese men. Asian J Androl. 2015;17(5):826-30.
Yin, Z., Yang, J. R., Rao, J. M., Song, W., & Zhou, K. Q. (2015). Association between benign prostatic hyperplasia, body mass index, and metabolic syndrome in Chinese men. Asian Journal of Andrology, 17(5), 826-30. https://doi.org/10.4103/1008-682X.148081
Yin Z, et al. Association Between Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia, Body Mass Index, and Metabolic Syndrome in Chinese Men. Asian J Androl. 2015 Sep-Oct;17(5):826-30. PubMed PMID: 25677137.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between benign prostatic hyperplasia, body mass index, and metabolic syndrome in Chinese men. AU - Yin,Zhuo, AU - Yang,Jin-Rui, AU - Rao,Jian-Ming, AU - Song,Wei, AU - Zhou,Ke-Qin, PY - 2015/2/14/entrez PY - 2015/2/14/pubmed PY - 2016/6/2/medline SP - 826 EP - 30 JF - Asian journal of andrology JO - Asian J Androl VL - 17 IS - 5 N2 - Previous studies have showed that men suffering from diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome (MetS) and obesity have a higher risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The present study aimed to examine the association between BPH, obesity, and features of MetS among men of the Hunan area of China. For this cross-sectional study, 904 males (aged 50-59 years) were included. MetS parameters, International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, total prostate volume (TPV), postvoid residual volume (PVR) and maximum urine flow rate (Qmax) were measured. Results showed that MetS was associated with TPV (P = 0.048), PVR (P = 0.004) and IPSS (P = 0.011), but not with other indicators of BPH progression such as PSA levels or Qmax. MetS was associated with the voiding symptoms score (P < 0.05), but not with the storage symptom score. In addition, body mass index and fasting blood glucose positively correlated with TPV (r = 0.416, P< 0.001; and r = 0.310, P= 0.011, respectively). In conclusion, results suggest that MetS is associated with higher prostatic volume, prostate symptom score and voiding symptoms, but not with other features of prostatic hyperplasia such as PSA levels or Qmax. Changes in lifestyle factors, including physical activity and prevention of MetS, might be useful to prevent BPH and its progression, but further studies are needed. SN - 1745-7262 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25677137/Association_between_benign_prostatic_hyperplasia_body_mass_index_and_metabolic_syndrome_in_Chinese_men_ L2 - http://www.ajandrology.com/article.asp?issn=1008-682X;year=2015;volume=17;issue=5;spage=826;epage=830;aulast=Yin DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -