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Consumption of beer and colorectal cancer incidence: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Several meta-analyses and reports from the World Cancer Research Fund supported a risk association between alcohol consumption and colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the association for beer consumption, the common type of alcoholic beverage, remains unclear.

METHODS

We identified studies by a literature search of PUBMED and EMBASE through 30 June 2014. Summary relative risks (SRRs) with their 95% CIs were calculated with a fixed or random effects model.

RESULTS

Twelve case-control and nine cohort studies were included. Compared with non-alcohol drinkers or non-beer drinkers, any beer drinkers were associated with an increased risk of CRC (SRR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.06-1.37; p(heterogeneity) <0.001, I(2) = 73.3%), which was stronger in the rectum than in the colon. The categorical meta-analysis indicated that heavy (≥ 2 drinks/day) beer drinking was related to increased risk of CRC (SRR = 1.37, 95% CI 1.26-1.49), while light or moderate beer drinking was not. The dose-response analysis demonstrated that an increase of one drink per day in beer consumption was related to an increased risk of CRC (SRR = 1.13, 95% CI, 1.06-1.21). There was evidence of a potential nonlinear association between beer intake and CRC incidence (p = 0.002 for nonlinearity).

CONCLUSIONS

The results from this meta-analysis suggest that heavy (≥ 2 drinks/day) beer drinking may be associated with increased CRC risk. More researches with improved control of confounding and actual measurement of beer consumption are needed to confirm these findings.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Colorectal Surgery, Renji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1630 Dongfang Road, Pudong New District, 200127, Shanghai, China.

    Source

    Cancer causes & control : CCC 26:4 2015 Apr pg 549-60

    MeSH

    Alcohol Drinking
    Beer
    Colorectal Neoplasms
    Humans
    Incidence
    Risk

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Meta-Analysis

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    25677844

    Citation

    Zhang, Cheng, and Min Zhong. "Consumption of Beer and Colorectal Cancer Incidence: a Meta-analysis of Observational Studies." Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, vol. 26, no. 4, 2015, pp. 549-60.
    Zhang C, Zhong M. Consumption of beer and colorectal cancer incidence: a meta-analysis of observational studies. Cancer Causes Control. 2015;26(4):549-60.
    Zhang, C., & Zhong, M. (2015). Consumption of beer and colorectal cancer incidence: a meta-analysis of observational studies. Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, 26(4), pp. 549-60. doi:10.1007/s10552-015-0532-5.
    Zhang C, Zhong M. Consumption of Beer and Colorectal Cancer Incidence: a Meta-analysis of Observational Studies. Cancer Causes Control. 2015;26(4):549-60. PubMed PMID: 25677844.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Consumption of beer and colorectal cancer incidence: a meta-analysis of observational studies. AU - Zhang,Cheng, AU - Zhong,Min, Y1 - 2015/02/13/ PY - 2014/11/08/received PY - 2015/02/05/accepted PY - 2015/2/14/entrez PY - 2015/2/14/pubmed PY - 2016/3/22/medline SP - 549 EP - 60 JF - Cancer causes & control : CCC JO - Cancer Causes Control VL - 26 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Several meta-analyses and reports from the World Cancer Research Fund supported a risk association between alcohol consumption and colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the association for beer consumption, the common type of alcoholic beverage, remains unclear. METHODS: We identified studies by a literature search of PUBMED and EMBASE through 30 June 2014. Summary relative risks (SRRs) with their 95% CIs were calculated with a fixed or random effects model. RESULTS: Twelve case-control and nine cohort studies were included. Compared with non-alcohol drinkers or non-beer drinkers, any beer drinkers were associated with an increased risk of CRC (SRR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.06-1.37; p(heterogeneity) <0.001, I(2) = 73.3%), which was stronger in the rectum than in the colon. The categorical meta-analysis indicated that heavy (≥ 2 drinks/day) beer drinking was related to increased risk of CRC (SRR = 1.37, 95% CI 1.26-1.49), while light or moderate beer drinking was not. The dose-response analysis demonstrated that an increase of one drink per day in beer consumption was related to an increased risk of CRC (SRR = 1.13, 95% CI, 1.06-1.21). There was evidence of a potential nonlinear association between beer intake and CRC incidence (p = 0.002 for nonlinearity). CONCLUSIONS: The results from this meta-analysis suggest that heavy (≥ 2 drinks/day) beer drinking may be associated with increased CRC risk. More researches with improved control of confounding and actual measurement of beer consumption are needed to confirm these findings. SN - 1573-7225 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25677844/Consumption_of_beer_and_colorectal_cancer_incidence:_a_meta_analysis_of_observational_studies_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-015-0532-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -