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Head injury and risk for Parkinson disease: results from a Danish case-control study.
Neurology. 2015 Mar 17; 84(11):1098-103.Neur

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the association between head injuries throughout life and the risk for Parkinson disease (PD) in an interview-based case-control study.

METHODS

We identified 1,705 patients diagnosed with PD at 10 neurologic centers in Denmark in 1996-2009 and verified their diagnoses in medical records. Patients were matched to 1,785 controls randomly selected from the Danish Central Population Register on sex and year of birth. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression.

RESULTS

We observed no association between any head injury before first cardinal symptom and PD (OR 1.02; 95% CI 0.88, 1.19). Examination of number of head injuries (1: OR 1.02; 95% CI 0.87, 1.20; ≥2: OR 1.03; 95% CI 0.72, 1.47) or hospitalization for a head injury (OR 0.89; 95% CI 0.70, 1.12) did not show an association with PD. For 954 study subjects with at least one head injury, there was no evidence of an association between loss of consciousness (OR 0.89; 95% CI 0.67, 1.17), duration of loss of consciousness (≤1 minute: OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.58, 1.49; 1-5 minutes: OR 0.74; 95% CI 0.51, 1.08; ≥5 minutes: OR 0.81; 95% CI 0.53, 1.24), or amnesia (OR 1.31; 95% CI 0.88, 1.95) and risk for PD. Application of a lag time of 10 years between head injury and first cardinal symptom resulted in similar risk estimates.

CONCLUSIONS

The results do not support the hypothesis that head injury increases the risk for PD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the Danish Cancer Society Research Center (L.K., K.R., L.R., J.C., C.F.L.), Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark; the Department of Epidemiology, Fielding School of Public Health (P.-C.L., B.R.), and the Department of Neurology, School of Medicine (B.R.), University of California, Los Angeles; the Department of Health Care Management (P.-C.L.), College of Healthcare Administration and Management, National Taipei University of Nursing Health Sciences, Taipei, Taiwan; and the Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (C.F.L.), Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. kenborg@cancer.dk.From the Danish Cancer Society Research Center (L.K., K.R., L.R., J.C., C.F.L.), Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark; the Department of Epidemiology, Fielding School of Public Health (P.-C.L., B.R.), and the Department of Neurology, School of Medicine (B.R.), University of California, Los Angeles; the Department of Health Care Management (P.-C.L.), College of Healthcare Administration and Management, National Taipei University of Nursing Health Sciences, Taipei, Taiwan; and the Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (C.F.L.), Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.From the Danish Cancer Society Research Center (L.K., K.R., L.R., J.C., C.F.L.), Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark; the Department of Epidemiology, Fielding School of Public Health (P.-C.L., B.R.), and the Department of Neurology, School of Medicine (B.R.), University of California, Los Angeles; the Department of Health Care Management (P.-C.L.), College of Healthcare Administration and Management, National Taipei University of Nursing Health Sciences, Taipei, Taiwan; and the Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (C.F.L.), Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.From the Danish Cancer Society Research Center (L.K., K.R., L.R., J.C., C.F.L.), Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark; the Department of Epidemiology, Fielding School of Public Health (P.-C.L., B.R.), and the Department of Neurology, School of Medicine (B.R.), University of California, Los Angeles; the Department of Health Care Management (P.-C.L.), College of Healthcare Administration and Management, National Taipei University of Nursing Health Sciences, Taipei, Taiwan; and the Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (C.F.L.), Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.From the Danish Cancer Society Research Center (L.K., K.R., L.R., J.C., C.F.L.), Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark; the Department of Epidemiology, Fielding School of Public Health (P.-C.L., B.R.), and the Department of Neurology, School of Medicine (B.R.), University of California, Los Angeles; the Department of Health Care Management (P.-C.L.), College of Healthcare Administration and Management, National Taipei University of Nursing Health Sciences, Taipei, Taiwan; and the Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (C.F.L.), Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.From the Danish Cancer Society Research Center (L.K., K.R., L.R., J.C., C.F.L.), Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark; the Department of Epidemiology, Fielding School of Public Health (P.-C.L., B.R.), and the Department of Neurology, School of Medicine (B.R.), University of California, Los Angeles; the Department of Health Care Management (P.-C.L.), College of Healthcare Administration and Management, National Taipei University of Nursing Health Sciences, Taipei, Taiwan; and the Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (C.F.L.), Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.From the Danish Cancer Society Research Center (L.K., K.R., L.R., J.C., C.F.L.), Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark; the Department of Epidemiology, Fielding School of Public Health (P.-C.L., B.R.), and the Department of Neurology, School of Medicine (B.R.), University of California, Los Angeles; the Department of Health Care Management (P.-C.L.), College of Healthcare Administration and Management, National Taipei University of Nursing Health Sciences, Taipei, Taiwan; and the Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (C.F.L.), Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25681453

Citation

Kenborg, Line, et al. "Head Injury and Risk for Parkinson Disease: Results From a Danish Case-control Study." Neurology, vol. 84, no. 11, 2015, pp. 1098-103.
Kenborg L, Rugbjerg K, Lee PC, et al. Head injury and risk for Parkinson disease: results from a Danish case-control study. Neurology. 2015;84(11):1098-103.
Kenborg, L., Rugbjerg, K., Lee, P. C., Ravnskjær, L., Christensen, J., Ritz, B., & Lassen, C. F. (2015). Head injury and risk for Parkinson disease: results from a Danish case-control study. Neurology, 84(11), 1098-103. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000001362
Kenborg L, et al. Head Injury and Risk for Parkinson Disease: Results From a Danish Case-control Study. Neurology. 2015 Mar 17;84(11):1098-103. PubMed PMID: 25681453.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Head injury and risk for Parkinson disease: results from a Danish case-control study. AU - Kenborg,Line, AU - Rugbjerg,Kathrine, AU - Lee,Pei-Chen, AU - Ravnskjær,Line, AU - Christensen,Jane, AU - Ritz,Beate, AU - Lassen,Christina F, Y1 - 2015/02/13/ PY - 2015/2/15/entrez PY - 2015/2/15/pubmed PY - 2015/6/16/medline SP - 1098 EP - 103 JF - Neurology JO - Neurology VL - 84 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between head injuries throughout life and the risk for Parkinson disease (PD) in an interview-based case-control study. METHODS: We identified 1,705 patients diagnosed with PD at 10 neurologic centers in Denmark in 1996-2009 and verified their diagnoses in medical records. Patients were matched to 1,785 controls randomly selected from the Danish Central Population Register on sex and year of birth. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. RESULTS: We observed no association between any head injury before first cardinal symptom and PD (OR 1.02; 95% CI 0.88, 1.19). Examination of number of head injuries (1: OR 1.02; 95% CI 0.87, 1.20; ≥2: OR 1.03; 95% CI 0.72, 1.47) or hospitalization for a head injury (OR 0.89; 95% CI 0.70, 1.12) did not show an association with PD. For 954 study subjects with at least one head injury, there was no evidence of an association between loss of consciousness (OR 0.89; 95% CI 0.67, 1.17), duration of loss of consciousness (≤1 minute: OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.58, 1.49; 1-5 minutes: OR 0.74; 95% CI 0.51, 1.08; ≥5 minutes: OR 0.81; 95% CI 0.53, 1.24), or amnesia (OR 1.31; 95% CI 0.88, 1.95) and risk for PD. Application of a lag time of 10 years between head injury and first cardinal symptom resulted in similar risk estimates. CONCLUSIONS: The results do not support the hypothesis that head injury increases the risk for PD. SN - 1526-632X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25681453/Head_injury_and_risk_for_Parkinson_disease:_results_from_a_Danish_case_control_study_ L2 - http://www.neurology.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=25681453 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -