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Adding justice to the clinical and public health ethics arguments for mandatory seasonal influenza immunisation for healthcare workers.
J Med Ethics. 2015 Aug; 41(8):682-6.JM

Abstract

Ethical considerations from both the clinical and public health perspectives have been used to examine whether it is ethically permissible to mandate the seasonal influenza vaccine for healthcare workers (HCWs). Both frameworks have resulted in arguments for and against the requirement. Neither perspective resolves the question fully. By adding components of justice to the argument, I seek to provide a more fulsome ethical defence for requiring seasonal influenza immunisation for HCWs. Two critical components of a just society support requiring vaccination: fairness of opportunity and the obligation to follow democratically formulated rules. The fairness of opportunity is informed by Rawls' two principles of justice. The obligation to follow democratically formulated rules allows us to focus simultaneously on freedom, plurality and solidarity. Justice requires equitable participation in and benefit from cooperative schemes to gain or profit socially as individuals and as a community. And to be just, HCW immunisation exemptions should be limited to medical contraindications only. In addition to the HCWs fiduciary duty to do what is best for the patient and the public health duty to protect the community with effective and minimally intrusive interventions, HCWs are members of a just society in which all members have an obligation to participate equitably in order to partake in the benefits of membership.

Authors

No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25687674

Citation

Lee, Lisa M.. "Adding Justice to the Clinical and Public Health Ethics Arguments for Mandatory Seasonal Influenza Immunisation for Healthcare Workers." Journal of Medical Ethics, vol. 41, no. 8, 2015, pp. 682-6.
Lee LM. Adding justice to the clinical and public health ethics arguments for mandatory seasonal influenza immunisation for healthcare workers. J Med Ethics. 2015;41(8):682-6.
Lee, L. M. (2015). Adding justice to the clinical and public health ethics arguments for mandatory seasonal influenza immunisation for healthcare workers. Journal of Medical Ethics, 41(8), 682-6. https://doi.org/10.1136/medethics-2014-102557
Lee LM. Adding Justice to the Clinical and Public Health Ethics Arguments for Mandatory Seasonal Influenza Immunisation for Healthcare Workers. J Med Ethics. 2015;41(8):682-6. PubMed PMID: 25687674.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adding justice to the clinical and public health ethics arguments for mandatory seasonal influenza immunisation for healthcare workers. A1 - Lee,Lisa M, Y1 - 2015/02/16/ PY - 2014/10/29/received PY - 2015/01/14/accepted PY - 2015/2/18/entrez PY - 2015/2/18/pubmed PY - 2016/6/9/medline KW - Ethics KW - Health Personnel KW - Policy Guidelines/Inst. Review Boards/Review Cttes. KW - Public Health Ethics SP - 682 EP - 6 JF - Journal of medical ethics JO - J Med Ethics VL - 41 IS - 8 N2 - Ethical considerations from both the clinical and public health perspectives have been used to examine whether it is ethically permissible to mandate the seasonal influenza vaccine for healthcare workers (HCWs). Both frameworks have resulted in arguments for and against the requirement. Neither perspective resolves the question fully. By adding components of justice to the argument, I seek to provide a more fulsome ethical defence for requiring seasonal influenza immunisation for HCWs. Two critical components of a just society support requiring vaccination: fairness of opportunity and the obligation to follow democratically formulated rules. The fairness of opportunity is informed by Rawls' two principles of justice. The obligation to follow democratically formulated rules allows us to focus simultaneously on freedom, plurality and solidarity. Justice requires equitable participation in and benefit from cooperative schemes to gain or profit socially as individuals and as a community. And to be just, HCW immunisation exemptions should be limited to medical contraindications only. In addition to the HCWs fiduciary duty to do what is best for the patient and the public health duty to protect the community with effective and minimally intrusive interventions, HCWs are members of a just society in which all members have an obligation to participate equitably in order to partake in the benefits of membership. SN - 1473-4257 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25687674/Adding_justice_to_the_clinical_and_public_health_ethics_arguments_for_mandatory_seasonal_influenza_immunisation_for_healthcare_workers_ L2 - http://jme.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=25687674 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -