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Prevalence of self-reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk among indigenous Sami and non-Sami in Northern- and Mid-Norway - the SAMINOR study.
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015; 74:25762.IJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The main purpose of this work was to identify the prevalence of self-reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk among Sami and non-Sami adults.

STUDY DESIGN

A cross-sectional population-based study (the SAMINOR study). Data were collected by self-administrated questionnaires.

METHOD

SAMINOR is a population-based study of health and living conditions conducted in 24 municipalities in Northern Norway during 2003 and 2004. The present study included 15,546 individuals aged between 36 and 79, whose ethnicity was categorized as Sami (33.4%), Kven (7.3%) and Norwegian majority population (57.2%).

RESULTS

Sami respondents had a higher prevalence of self-reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk than the Norwegian majority population. The reporting was highest among Sami females (27.1%). Consumption of milk and dairy products (yoghurt and cheese) was high among all the ethnic groups. However, significantly more Sami than non-Sami never (or rarely) consume milk or cheese, and individuals who reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk had an significant lower intake of dairy products than those not reporting stomach symptoms after consuming dairy products. Sami reported general abdominal pain more often than the majority population. The adjusted models show a significant effect of Sami ethnicity in both men and women on self-reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk. In females, the odds ratio (OR)=1.77 (p=0.001) and in males OR=1.64 (p=0.001).

CONCLUSION

Our study shows that the Sami population reported more stomach symptoms after consuming milk, suggesting a higher prevalence of milk intolerance among the Sami population than the Norwegian majority population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Sami Health Research, Institute of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; ketil.lenert.hansen@uit.no.Institute of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.The Finnmark Clinic, University Hospital of Northern Norway, Karasjok, Norway.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25694052

Citation

Hansen, Ketil Lenert, et al. "Prevalence of Self-reported Stomach Symptoms After Consuming Milk Among Indigenous Sami and non-Sami in Northern- and Mid-Norway - the SAMINOR Study." International Journal of Circumpolar Health, vol. 74, 2015, p. 25762.
Hansen KL, Brustad M, Johnsen K. Prevalence of self-reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk among indigenous Sami and non-Sami in Northern- and Mid-Norway - the SAMINOR study. Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:25762.
Hansen, K. L., Brustad, M., & Johnsen, K. (2015). Prevalence of self-reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk among indigenous Sami and non-Sami in Northern- and Mid-Norway - the SAMINOR study. International Journal of Circumpolar Health, 74, 25762. https://doi.org/10.3402/ijch.v74.25762
Hansen KL, Brustad M, Johnsen K. Prevalence of Self-reported Stomach Symptoms After Consuming Milk Among Indigenous Sami and non-Sami in Northern- and Mid-Norway - the SAMINOR Study. Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:25762. PubMed PMID: 25694052.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence of self-reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk among indigenous Sami and non-Sami in Northern- and Mid-Norway - the SAMINOR study. AU - Hansen,Ketil Lenert, AU - Brustad,Magritt, AU - Johnsen,Knut, Y1 - 2015/02/17/ PY - 2014/08/18/received PY - 2015/01/08/revised PY - 2015/01/12/accepted PY - 2015/2/20/entrez PY - 2015/2/20/pubmed PY - 2016/11/12/medline KW - Arctic KW - Sami KW - epidemiology KW - ethnicity KW - health KW - hypolactasia KW - lactose intolerance KW - milk intolerance SP - 25762 EP - 25762 JF - International journal of circumpolar health JO - Int J Circumpolar Health VL - 74 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The main purpose of this work was to identify the prevalence of self-reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk among Sami and non-Sami adults. STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional population-based study (the SAMINOR study). Data were collected by self-administrated questionnaires. METHOD: SAMINOR is a population-based study of health and living conditions conducted in 24 municipalities in Northern Norway during 2003 and 2004. The present study included 15,546 individuals aged between 36 and 79, whose ethnicity was categorized as Sami (33.4%), Kven (7.3%) and Norwegian majority population (57.2%). RESULTS: Sami respondents had a higher prevalence of self-reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk than the Norwegian majority population. The reporting was highest among Sami females (27.1%). Consumption of milk and dairy products (yoghurt and cheese) was high among all the ethnic groups. However, significantly more Sami than non-Sami never (or rarely) consume milk or cheese, and individuals who reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk had an significant lower intake of dairy products than those not reporting stomach symptoms after consuming dairy products. Sami reported general abdominal pain more often than the majority population. The adjusted models show a significant effect of Sami ethnicity in both men and women on self-reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk. In females, the odds ratio (OR)=1.77 (p=0.001) and in males OR=1.64 (p=0.001). CONCLUSION: Our study shows that the Sami population reported more stomach symptoms after consuming milk, suggesting a higher prevalence of milk intolerance among the Sami population than the Norwegian majority population. SN - 2242-3982 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25694052/Prevalence_of_self_reported_stomach_symptoms_after_consuming_milk_among_indigenous_Sami_and_non_Sami_in_Northern__and_Mid_Norway___the_SAMINOR_study_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3402/ijch.v74.25762 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -