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Ongoing challenges responding to behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia.
Int Nurs Rev. 2015 Dec; 62(4):506-16.IN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Mid- to late-stage dementia is often characterized by behavioural and psychological symptoms, including, but not limited to physical and verbal aggression.

INTRODUCTION

Although there is a considerable research about the prevalence, aetiology, and management of behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia, there is limited research about the experience of caring for people with such symptoms in long-term aged care facilities.

AIM

The aims of the study were to describe: (i) nurses' experiences of caring for people with behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia in long-term aged care facilities, and (ii) strategies nurses used to deal with these symptoms.

METHODS

A qualitative exploratory and descriptive design, involving focus group interviews with 30 nurses from three long-term aged care units in Australia. The transcripts were analysed using inductive content analysis.

RESULTS

The findings revealed five interrelated themes: (i) working under difficult conditions, (ii) behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia: an everyday encounter, (iii) making sense of behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia, (iv) attempting to manage behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia, and (v) feeling undervalued.

CONCLUSION

This study highlighted the difficult conditions under which nurses worked and the complexity of caring for individuals who have behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia.

IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING AND HEALTH POLICY

Organizational efforts to enhance the quality of care for individuals with behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia in long-term aged care facilities should extend beyond staff education to heed nurses' concerns about organizational barriers to interpersonal care.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Deakin University, Melbourne, Vic., Australia.Centre for Research in Geriatric Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.Faculty of Nursing, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.School of Nursing and Midwifery, Deakin University, Melbourne, Vic., Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25711925

Citation

Ostaszkiewicz, J, et al. "Ongoing Challenges Responding to Behavioural and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia." International Nursing Review, vol. 62, no. 4, 2015, pp. 506-16.
Ostaszkiewicz J, Lakhan P, O'Connell B, et al. Ongoing challenges responding to behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia. Int Nurs Rev. 2015;62(4):506-16.
Ostaszkiewicz, J., Lakhan, P., O'Connell, B., & Hawkins, M. (2015). Ongoing challenges responding to behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia. International Nursing Review, 62(4), 506-16. https://doi.org/10.1111/inr.12180
Ostaszkiewicz J, et al. Ongoing Challenges Responding to Behavioural and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia. Int Nurs Rev. 2015;62(4):506-16. PubMed PMID: 25711925.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ongoing challenges responding to behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia. AU - Ostaszkiewicz,J, AU - Lakhan,P, AU - O'Connell,B, AU - Hawkins,M, Y1 - 2015/02/25/ PY - 2015/2/26/entrez PY - 2015/2/26/pubmed PY - 2016/9/27/medline KW - Aggression Management KW - Dementia KW - Focus Groups KW - Gerontology KW - Older People Nursing KW - Psycho-Geriatrics Nursing KW - Qualitative Methods KW - Restraint KW - Violence in the Workplace KW - Workforce Issues SP - 506 EP - 16 JF - International nursing review JO - Int Nurs Rev VL - 62 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Mid- to late-stage dementia is often characterized by behavioural and psychological symptoms, including, but not limited to physical and verbal aggression. INTRODUCTION: Although there is a considerable research about the prevalence, aetiology, and management of behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia, there is limited research about the experience of caring for people with such symptoms in long-term aged care facilities. AIM: The aims of the study were to describe: (i) nurses' experiences of caring for people with behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia in long-term aged care facilities, and (ii) strategies nurses used to deal with these symptoms. METHODS: A qualitative exploratory and descriptive design, involving focus group interviews with 30 nurses from three long-term aged care units in Australia. The transcripts were analysed using inductive content analysis. RESULTS: The findings revealed five interrelated themes: (i) working under difficult conditions, (ii) behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia: an everyday encounter, (iii) making sense of behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia, (iv) attempting to manage behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia, and (v) feeling undervalued. CONCLUSION: This study highlighted the difficult conditions under which nurses worked and the complexity of caring for individuals who have behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING AND HEALTH POLICY: Organizational efforts to enhance the quality of care for individuals with behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia in long-term aged care facilities should extend beyond staff education to heed nurses' concerns about organizational barriers to interpersonal care. SN - 1466-7657 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25711925/Ongoing_challenges_responding_to_behavioural_and_psychological_symptoms_of_dementia_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/inr.12180 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -