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A water soluble additive to suppress respirable dust from concrete-cutting chainsaws: a case study.
J Occup Environ Hyg. 2015; 12(4):D29-34.JO

Abstract

Respirable dust is of particular concern in the construction industry because it contains crystalline silica. Respirable forms of silica are a severe health threat because they heighten the risk of numerous respirable diseases. Concrete cutting, a common work practice in the construction industry, is a major contributor to dust generation. No studies have been found that focus on the dust suppression of concrete-cutting chainsaws, presumably because, during normal operation water is supplied continuously and copiously to the dust generation points. However, there is a desire to better understand dust creation at low water flow rates. In this case study, a water-soluble surfactant additive was used in the chainsaw's water supply. Cutting was performed on a free-standing concrete wall in a covered outdoor lab with a hand-held, gas-powered, concrete-cutting chainsaw. Air was sampled at the operator's lapel, and around the concrete wall to simulate nearby personnel. Two additive concentrations were tested (2.0% and 0.2%), across a range of fluid flow rates (0.38-3.8 Lpm [0.1-1.0 gpm] at 0.38 Lpm [0.1 gpm] increments). Results indicate that when a lower concentration of additive is used exposure levels increase. However, all exposure levels, once adjusted for 3 hours of continuous cutting in an 8-hour work shift, are below the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) permissible exposure limit (PEL) of 5 mg/m(3). Estimates were made using trend lines to predict the fluid flow rates that would cause respirable dust exposure to exceed both the OSHA PEL and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH®) threshold limit value (TLV).

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering Department , Oregon State University , Corvallis , Oregon.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25714034

Citation

Summers, Michael P., and John P. Parmigiani. "A Water Soluble Additive to Suppress Respirable Dust From Concrete-cutting Chainsaws: a Case Study." Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, vol. 12, no. 4, 2015, pp. D29-34.
Summers MP, Parmigiani JP. A water soluble additive to suppress respirable dust from concrete-cutting chainsaws: a case study. J Occup Environ Hyg. 2015;12(4):D29-34.
Summers, M. P., & Parmigiani, J. P. (2015). A water soluble additive to suppress respirable dust from concrete-cutting chainsaws: a case study. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, 12(4), D29-34. https://doi.org/10.1080/15459624.2014.989360
Summers MP, Parmigiani JP. A Water Soluble Additive to Suppress Respirable Dust From Concrete-cutting Chainsaws: a Case Study. J Occup Environ Hyg. 2015;12(4):D29-34. PubMed PMID: 25714034.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A water soluble additive to suppress respirable dust from concrete-cutting chainsaws: a case study. AU - Summers,Michael P, AU - Parmigiani,John P, PY - 2015/2/26/entrez PY - 2015/2/26/pubmed PY - 2015/10/28/medline KW - additive KW - chainsaw KW - concrete KW - dust SP - D29 EP - 34 JF - Journal of occupational and environmental hygiene JO - J Occup Environ Hyg VL - 12 IS - 4 N2 - Respirable dust is of particular concern in the construction industry because it contains crystalline silica. Respirable forms of silica are a severe health threat because they heighten the risk of numerous respirable diseases. Concrete cutting, a common work practice in the construction industry, is a major contributor to dust generation. No studies have been found that focus on the dust suppression of concrete-cutting chainsaws, presumably because, during normal operation water is supplied continuously and copiously to the dust generation points. However, there is a desire to better understand dust creation at low water flow rates. In this case study, a water-soluble surfactant additive was used in the chainsaw's water supply. Cutting was performed on a free-standing concrete wall in a covered outdoor lab with a hand-held, gas-powered, concrete-cutting chainsaw. Air was sampled at the operator's lapel, and around the concrete wall to simulate nearby personnel. Two additive concentrations were tested (2.0% and 0.2%), across a range of fluid flow rates (0.38-3.8 Lpm [0.1-1.0 gpm] at 0.38 Lpm [0.1 gpm] increments). Results indicate that when a lower concentration of additive is used exposure levels increase. However, all exposure levels, once adjusted for 3 hours of continuous cutting in an 8-hour work shift, are below the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) permissible exposure limit (PEL) of 5 mg/m(3). Estimates were made using trend lines to predict the fluid flow rates that would cause respirable dust exposure to exceed both the OSHA PEL and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH®) threshold limit value (TLV). SN - 1545-9632 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25714034/A_water_soluble_additive_to_suppress_respirable_dust_from_concrete_cutting_chainsaws:_a_case_study_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15459624.2014.989360 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -