Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Intractable hiccups caused by syringobulbia and syringomyelia associated with intramedullary spinal hemangioblastoma.
Eur Spine J. 2015 May; 24 Suppl 4:S614-8.ES

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Hiccups caused by a neoplasm in the spinal cord are rare.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

We report a case of intractable hiccups caused by syringobulbia and syringomyelia associated with cervical intramedullary spinal hemangioblastoma, which was successfully treated by surgical excision. A 60-year-old man was referred from the neurology department after presenting with hiccups for 1 year. The hiccups were aggravated 3 months ago and were sustained during eating or sleeping. Several doctors administered a muscle relaxant and an anticonvulsant, but they were ineffective. Spinal MRI revealed a huge syringomyelia from C2 to T2, associated with a highly enhancing intramedullary mass lesion at the C5 level. The hiccups were ceased after removal of the tumor through a right hemilaminectomy. The pathology of the specimen was hemangioblastoma. The size of the syringobulbia and syringomyelia decreased markedly on MRI checked 5 months after surgery.

CONCLUSIONS

Intractable hiccups can be caused by syringobulbia associated with an intramedullary cord tumor in the cervical area and possible mechanisms of hiccups were reviewed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurosurgery, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, 1174 Jung-1-dong, Wonmi-gu, Bucheon, Gyunggi, 424-767, Republic of Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25716660

Citation

Jeong, Je Hoon, et al. "Intractable Hiccups Caused By Syringobulbia and Syringomyelia Associated With Intramedullary Spinal Hemangioblastoma." European Spine Journal : Official Publication of the European Spine Society, the European Spinal Deformity Society, and the European Section of the Cervical Spine Research Society, vol. 24 Suppl 4, 2015, pp. S614-8.
Jeong JH, Im SB, Shin DS, et al. Intractable hiccups caused by syringobulbia and syringomyelia associated with intramedullary spinal hemangioblastoma. Eur Spine J. 2015;24 Suppl 4:S614-8.
Jeong, J. H., Im, S. B., Shin, D. S., Hwang, S. C., & Kim, B. T. (2015). Intractable hiccups caused by syringobulbia and syringomyelia associated with intramedullary spinal hemangioblastoma. European Spine Journal : Official Publication of the European Spine Society, the European Spinal Deformity Society, and the European Section of the Cervical Spine Research Society, 24 Suppl 4, S614-8. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00586-015-3822-4
Jeong JH, et al. Intractable Hiccups Caused By Syringobulbia and Syringomyelia Associated With Intramedullary Spinal Hemangioblastoma. Eur Spine J. 2015;24 Suppl 4:S614-8. PubMed PMID: 25716660.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intractable hiccups caused by syringobulbia and syringomyelia associated with intramedullary spinal hemangioblastoma. AU - Jeong,Je Hoon, AU - Im,Soo-Bin, AU - Shin,Dong-Seong, AU - Hwang,Sun-Chul, AU - Kim,Bum-Tae, Y1 - 2015/02/26/ PY - 2014/10/30/received PY - 2015/02/15/accepted PY - 2015/02/15/revised PY - 2015/2/27/entrez PY - 2015/2/27/pubmed PY - 2015/12/22/medline SP - S614 EP - 8 JF - European spine journal : official publication of the European Spine Society, the European Spinal Deformity Society, and the European Section of the Cervical Spine Research Society JO - Eur Spine J VL - 24 Suppl 4 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Hiccups caused by a neoplasm in the spinal cord are rare. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We report a case of intractable hiccups caused by syringobulbia and syringomyelia associated with cervical intramedullary spinal hemangioblastoma, which was successfully treated by surgical excision. A 60-year-old man was referred from the neurology department after presenting with hiccups for 1 year. The hiccups were aggravated 3 months ago and were sustained during eating or sleeping. Several doctors administered a muscle relaxant and an anticonvulsant, but they were ineffective. Spinal MRI revealed a huge syringomyelia from C2 to T2, associated with a highly enhancing intramedullary mass lesion at the C5 level. The hiccups were ceased after removal of the tumor through a right hemilaminectomy. The pathology of the specimen was hemangioblastoma. The size of the syringobulbia and syringomyelia decreased markedly on MRI checked 5 months after surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Intractable hiccups can be caused by syringobulbia associated with an intramedullary cord tumor in the cervical area and possible mechanisms of hiccups were reviewed. SN - 1432-0932 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25716660/Intractable_hiccups_caused_by_syringobulbia_and_syringomyelia_associated_with_intramedullary_spinal_hemangioblastoma_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s00586-015-3822-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -