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Caffeine intake from coffee or tea and cognitive disorders: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Observational epidemiological studies such as cross-sectional, case-control, and cohort studies have reported inconsistent findings regarding the association between caffeine intake from coffee or tea and the risk of cognitive disorders such as dementia, Alzheimer's disease, cognitive impairment, and cognitive decline.

METHODS

We searched PubMed and EMBASE in September 2014. Three evaluators independently extracted and reviewed articles, based on predetermined selection criteria.

RESULTS

Out of 293 articles identified through the search and bibliographies of relevant articles, 20 epidemiological studies from 19 articles, which involved 31,479 participants (8,398 in six cross-sectional studies, 4,601 in five case-control studies, and 19,918 in nine cohort studies), were included in the final analysis. The pooled odds ratio (OR) or relative risk (RR) of caffeine intake from coffee or tea for cognitive disorders (dementia, Alzheimer's disease, cognitive impairment, and cognitive decline) was 0.82 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67-1.01, I² = 63.2%) in a random-effects meta-analysis. In the subgroup meta-analysis by caffeine sources, the summary OR or RR of coffee intake was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.70-0.98; I² = 44.8%). However, in the subgroup meta-analysis by study design, the summary estimates (RR or OR) of coffee intake for cognitive disorders were 0.70 (95% CI, 0.50-0.98; I² = 42.0%) for cross-sectional studies, 0.82 (95% CI, 0.55-1.24; I² = 33.4%) for case-control studies, and 0.90 (95% CI, 0.59-1.36; I² = 60.0%) for cohort studies.

CONCLUSIONS

This meta-analysis found that caffeine intake from coffee or tea was not associated with the risk of cognitive disorders.

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    Source

    Neuroepidemiology 44:1 2015 pg 51-63

    MeSH

    Alzheimer Disease
    Caffeine
    Case-Control Studies
    Coffee
    Cognition Disorders
    Cohort Studies
    Dementia
    Humans
    Risk
    Tea

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Meta-Analysis

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    25721193

    Citation

    Kim, Young-Seok, et al. "Caffeine Intake From Coffee or Tea and Cognitive Disorders: a Meta-analysis of Observational Studies." Neuroepidemiology, vol. 44, no. 1, 2015, pp. 51-63.
    Kim YS, Kwak SM, Myung SK. Caffeine intake from coffee or tea and cognitive disorders: a meta-analysis of observational studies. Neuroepidemiology. 2015;44(1):51-63.
    Kim, Y. S., Kwak, S. M., & Myung, S. K. (2015). Caffeine intake from coffee or tea and cognitive disorders: a meta-analysis of observational studies. Neuroepidemiology, 44(1), pp. 51-63.
    Kim YS, Kwak SM, Myung SK. Caffeine Intake From Coffee or Tea and Cognitive Disorders: a Meta-analysis of Observational Studies. Neuroepidemiology. 2015;44(1):51-63. PubMed PMID: 25721193.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Caffeine intake from coffee or tea and cognitive disorders: a meta-analysis of observational studies. AU - Kim,Young-Seok, AU - Kwak,Sang Mi, AU - Myung,Seung-Kwon, Y1 - 2015/02/17/ PY - 2014/02/17/received PY - 2014/12/20/accepted PY - 2015/2/28/entrez PY - 2015/2/28/pubmed PY - 2016/1/7/medline SP - 51 EP - 63 JF - Neuroepidemiology JO - Neuroepidemiology VL - 44 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Observational epidemiological studies such as cross-sectional, case-control, and cohort studies have reported inconsistent findings regarding the association between caffeine intake from coffee or tea and the risk of cognitive disorders such as dementia, Alzheimer's disease, cognitive impairment, and cognitive decline. METHODS: We searched PubMed and EMBASE in September 2014. Three evaluators independently extracted and reviewed articles, based on predetermined selection criteria. RESULTS: Out of 293 articles identified through the search and bibliographies of relevant articles, 20 epidemiological studies from 19 articles, which involved 31,479 participants (8,398 in six cross-sectional studies, 4,601 in five case-control studies, and 19,918 in nine cohort studies), were included in the final analysis. The pooled odds ratio (OR) or relative risk (RR) of caffeine intake from coffee or tea for cognitive disorders (dementia, Alzheimer's disease, cognitive impairment, and cognitive decline) was 0.82 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67-1.01, I² = 63.2%) in a random-effects meta-analysis. In the subgroup meta-analysis by caffeine sources, the summary OR or RR of coffee intake was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.70-0.98; I² = 44.8%). However, in the subgroup meta-analysis by study design, the summary estimates (RR or OR) of coffee intake for cognitive disorders were 0.70 (95% CI, 0.50-0.98; I² = 42.0%) for cross-sectional studies, 0.82 (95% CI, 0.55-1.24; I² = 33.4%) for case-control studies, and 0.90 (95% CI, 0.59-1.36; I² = 60.0%) for cohort studies. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis found that caffeine intake from coffee or tea was not associated with the risk of cognitive disorders. SN - 1423-0208 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25721193/Caffeine_intake_from_coffee_or_tea_and_cognitive_disorders:_a_meta_analysis_of_observational_studies_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000371710 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -