Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Endocrine disrupting alkylphenolic chemicals and other contaminants in wastewater treatment plant effluents, urban streams, and fish in the Great Lakes and Upper Mississippi River Regions.
Sci Total Environ. 2015 Jun 01; 517:195-206.ST

Abstract

Urban streams are an integral part of the municipal water cycle and provide a point of discharge for wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents, allowing additional attenuation through dilution and transformation processes, as well as a conduit for transporting contaminants to downstream water supplies. Domestic and commercial activities dispose of wastes down-the-drain, resulting in wastewater containing complex chemical mixtures that are only partially removed during treatment. A key issue associated with WWTP effluent discharge into streams is the potential to cause endocrine disruption in fish. This study provides a long-term (1999-2009) evaluation of the occurrence of alkylphenolic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and other contaminants discharged from WWTPs into streams in the Great Lakes and Upper Mississippi River Regions (Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, and Ohio). The Greater Metropolitan Chicago Area Waterways, Illinois, were evaluated to determine contaminant concentrations in the major WWTP effluents and receiving streams, and assess the behavior of EDCs from their sources within the sewer collection system, through the major treatment unit processes at a WWTP, to their persistence and transport in the receiving stream. Water samples were analyzed for alkylphenolic EDCs and other contaminants, including 4-nonylphenol (NP), 4-nonylphenolpolyethoxylates (NPEO), 4-nonylphenolethoxycarboxylic acids (NPEC), 4-tert-octylphenol (OP), 4-tert-octylphenolpolyethoxylates (OPEO), bisphenol A, triclosan, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and trace elements. All of the compounds were detected in all of the WWTP effluents, with EDTA and NPEC having the greatest concentrations. The compounds also were detected in the WWTP effluent dominated rivers. Multiple fish species were collected from river and lake sites and analyzed for NP, NPEO, NPEC, OP, and OPEO. Whole-body fish tissue analysis indicated widespread occurrence of alkylphenolic compounds, with the highest concentrations occurring in streams with the greatest WWTP effluent content. Biomarkers of endocrine disruption in the fish indicated long-term exposure to estrogenic chemicals in the wastewater impacted urban waterways.

Authors+Show Affiliations

U.S. Geological Survey, 3215 Marine Street, Boulder, CO 80303, USA.Ryerson University, Department of Chemistry and Biology, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON M5B 2K3, Canada.U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agriculture Research Service, Environmental Management and Byproducts Utilization Laboratory, 10300 Baltimore Avenue, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA.Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago, 6001 West Pershing Road, Cicero, IL 60804, USA.Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago, 6001 West Pershing Road, Cicero, IL 60804, USA; Illinois Institute of Technology, Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, Chicago, IL 60616, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25727675

Citation

Barber, Larry B., et al. "Endocrine Disrupting Alkylphenolic Chemicals and Other Contaminants in Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluents, Urban Streams, and Fish in the Great Lakes and Upper Mississippi River Regions." The Science of the Total Environment, vol. 517, 2015, pp. 195-206.
Barber LB, Loyo-Rosales JE, Rice CP, et al. Endocrine disrupting alkylphenolic chemicals and other contaminants in wastewater treatment plant effluents, urban streams, and fish in the Great Lakes and Upper Mississippi River Regions. Sci Total Environ. 2015;517:195-206.
Barber, L. B., Loyo-Rosales, J. E., Rice, C. P., Minarik, T. A., & Oskouie, A. K. (2015). Endocrine disrupting alkylphenolic chemicals and other contaminants in wastewater treatment plant effluents, urban streams, and fish in the Great Lakes and Upper Mississippi River Regions. The Science of the Total Environment, 517, 195-206. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.02.035
Barber LB, et al. Endocrine Disrupting Alkylphenolic Chemicals and Other Contaminants in Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluents, Urban Streams, and Fish in the Great Lakes and Upper Mississippi River Regions. Sci Total Environ. 2015 Jun 1;517:195-206. PubMed PMID: 25727675.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Endocrine disrupting alkylphenolic chemicals and other contaminants in wastewater treatment plant effluents, urban streams, and fish in the Great Lakes and Upper Mississippi River Regions. AU - Barber,Larry B, AU - Loyo-Rosales,Jorge E, AU - Rice,Clifford P, AU - Minarik,Thomas A, AU - Oskouie,Ali K, Y1 - 2015/02/27/ PY - 2014/11/13/received PY - 2015/02/01/revised PY - 2015/02/10/accepted PY - 2015/3/3/entrez PY - 2015/3/3/pubmed PY - 2015/6/24/medline KW - 4-Nonylphenol compounds KW - 4-Tert-octylphenol compounds KW - Bisphenol A KW - Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid KW - Fish endocrine disruption KW - Gadolinium anomaly KW - Trace elements KW - Triclosan SP - 195 EP - 206 JF - The Science of the total environment JO - Sci. Total Environ. VL - 517 N2 - Urban streams are an integral part of the municipal water cycle and provide a point of discharge for wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents, allowing additional attenuation through dilution and transformation processes, as well as a conduit for transporting contaminants to downstream water supplies. Domestic and commercial activities dispose of wastes down-the-drain, resulting in wastewater containing complex chemical mixtures that are only partially removed during treatment. A key issue associated with WWTP effluent discharge into streams is the potential to cause endocrine disruption in fish. This study provides a long-term (1999-2009) evaluation of the occurrence of alkylphenolic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and other contaminants discharged from WWTPs into streams in the Great Lakes and Upper Mississippi River Regions (Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, and Ohio). The Greater Metropolitan Chicago Area Waterways, Illinois, were evaluated to determine contaminant concentrations in the major WWTP effluents and receiving streams, and assess the behavior of EDCs from their sources within the sewer collection system, through the major treatment unit processes at a WWTP, to their persistence and transport in the receiving stream. Water samples were analyzed for alkylphenolic EDCs and other contaminants, including 4-nonylphenol (NP), 4-nonylphenolpolyethoxylates (NPEO), 4-nonylphenolethoxycarboxylic acids (NPEC), 4-tert-octylphenol (OP), 4-tert-octylphenolpolyethoxylates (OPEO), bisphenol A, triclosan, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and trace elements. All of the compounds were detected in all of the WWTP effluents, with EDTA and NPEC having the greatest concentrations. The compounds also were detected in the WWTP effluent dominated rivers. Multiple fish species were collected from river and lake sites and analyzed for NP, NPEO, NPEC, OP, and OPEO. Whole-body fish tissue analysis indicated widespread occurrence of alkylphenolic compounds, with the highest concentrations occurring in streams with the greatest WWTP effluent content. Biomarkers of endocrine disruption in the fish indicated long-term exposure to estrogenic chemicals in the wastewater impacted urban waterways. SN - 1879-1026 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25727675/Endocrine_disrupting_alkylphenolic_chemicals_and_other_contaminants_in_wastewater_treatment_plant_effluents_urban_streams_and_fish_in_the_Great_Lakes_and_Upper_Mississippi_River_Regions_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0048-9697(15)00171-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -