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Lifestyle measures in the management of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: clinical and pathophysiological considerations.

Abstract

Several lifestyle and dietary factors are commonly cited as risk factors for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and modification of these factors has been advocated as first-line measures for the management of GORD. We performed a systematic review of the literature from 2005 to the present relating to the effect of these factors and their modification on GORD symptoms, physiological parameters of reflux as well as endoscopic appearances. Conflicting results existed for the association between smoking, alcohol and various dietary factors in the development of GORD. These equivocal findings are partly due to methodology problems. There is recent good evidence that weight reduction and smoking cessation are beneficial in reducing GORD symptoms. Clinical and physiological studies also suggest that some physical measures as well as modification of meal size and timing can also be beneficial. However, there is limited evidence for the role of avoiding alcohol and certain dietary ingredients including carbonated drinks, caffeine, fat, spicy foods, chocolate and mint.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Green Templeton College, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

    Department of Gastroenterology, St George's Hospital, Blackshaw Road, London SW17 0QT, UK.

    Source

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    25729556

    Citation

    Kang, J H-E, and J Y. Kang. "Lifestyle Measures in the Management of Gastro-oesophageal Reflux Disease: Clinical and Pathophysiological Considerations." Therapeutic Advances in Chronic Disease, vol. 6, no. 2, 2015, pp. 51-64.
    Kang JH, Kang JY. Lifestyle measures in the management of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: clinical and pathophysiological considerations. Ther Adv Chronic Dis. 2015;6(2):51-64.
    Kang, J. H., & Kang, J. Y. (2015). Lifestyle measures in the management of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: clinical and pathophysiological considerations. Therapeutic Advances in Chronic Disease, 6(2), pp. 51-64. doi:10.1177/2040622315569501.
    Kang JH, Kang JY. Lifestyle Measures in the Management of Gastro-oesophageal Reflux Disease: Clinical and Pathophysiological Considerations. Ther Adv Chronic Dis. 2015;6(2):51-64. PubMed PMID: 25729556.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Lifestyle measures in the management of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: clinical and pathophysiological considerations. AU - Kang,J H-E, AU - Kang,J Y, PY - 2015/3/3/entrez PY - 2015/3/3/pubmed PY - 2015/3/3/medline KW - alcohol KW - gastro-oesophageal reflux disease KW - head of bed elevation KW - lifestyle modification KW - obesity KW - posture KW - smoking KW - weight loss SP - 51 EP - 64 JF - Therapeutic advances in chronic disease JO - Ther Adv Chronic Dis VL - 6 IS - 2 N2 - Several lifestyle and dietary factors are commonly cited as risk factors for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and modification of these factors has been advocated as first-line measures for the management of GORD. We performed a systematic review of the literature from 2005 to the present relating to the effect of these factors and their modification on GORD symptoms, physiological parameters of reflux as well as endoscopic appearances. Conflicting results existed for the association between smoking, alcohol and various dietary factors in the development of GORD. These equivocal findings are partly due to methodology problems. There is recent good evidence that weight reduction and smoking cessation are beneficial in reducing GORD symptoms. Clinical and physiological studies also suggest that some physical measures as well as modification of meal size and timing can also be beneficial. However, there is limited evidence for the role of avoiding alcohol and certain dietary ingredients including carbonated drinks, caffeine, fat, spicy foods, chocolate and mint. SN - 2040-6223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25729556/full_citation L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/2040622315569501?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -