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Identification and characterization of the aroma-impact components of Thai fish sauce.
J Agric Food Chem. 2015 Mar 18; 63(10):2628-38.JA

Abstract

Comprehensive analysis of the potent odorants in Thai premium fish sauce samples was accomplished by use of complementary volatile isolation methods combined with gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) and GC-mass spectrometry. Odorants of intermediate and low volatility were determined by direct solvent extraction/solvent-assisted flavor evaporation (DSE-SAFE) and aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA). Meanwhile, static headspace dilution analysis (SHDA) and headspace solid-phase microextraction (H-SPME) were used to determine the highly volatile odorants. Results of AEDA indicated the importance (log3FD factor≥6) of five acidic odorants (butanoic acid, 3-methylbutanoic acid, 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone, 4-hydroxy-2-ethyl-5-methyl-3(2H)-furanone, and 2-phenylacetic acid) and four neutral/basic odorants (3-methylbutanal, (Z)-1,5-octadien-3-one, phenylacetaldehyde, and o-aminoacetophone). Results of SHDA indicated the predominant (log3FD factors≥5) headspace odorants were methanethiol, 2-methylpropanal, 2-methylbutanal, 3-methylbutanal, dimethyl trisulfide, 3-(methylthio)propanal, and butanoic acid. Concentrations for 21 odorants were determined by stable isotope dilution analysis (SIDA), and their odor-activity values (OAVs) were calculated. Among these, methanethiol, 2-methylpropanal, 3-methylbutanal, dimethyl trisulfide, 3-(methylthio)propanal, and butanoic acid had the highest OAVs (>500). Results of aroma recombination and omission studies revealed the importance of acids, aldehydes, and sulfur-containing compounds to the overall aroma of the Thai fish sauce.

Authors+Show Affiliations

†School of Food Technology, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000, Thailand.†School of Food Technology, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000, Thailand.‡Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Illinois, 1302 West Pennsylvania Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801, United States.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25730550

Citation

Lapsongphon, Nawaporn, et al. "Identification and Characterization of the Aroma-impact Components of Thai Fish Sauce." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol. 63, no. 10, 2015, pp. 2628-38.
Lapsongphon N, Yongsawatdigul J, Cadwallader KR. Identification and characterization of the aroma-impact components of Thai fish sauce. J Agric Food Chem. 2015;63(10):2628-38.
Lapsongphon, N., Yongsawatdigul, J., & Cadwallader, K. R. (2015). Identification and characterization of the aroma-impact components of Thai fish sauce. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 63(10), 2628-38. https://doi.org/10.1021/jf5061248
Lapsongphon N, Yongsawatdigul J, Cadwallader KR. Identification and Characterization of the Aroma-impact Components of Thai Fish Sauce. J Agric Food Chem. 2015 Mar 18;63(10):2628-38. PubMed PMID: 25730550.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Identification and characterization of the aroma-impact components of Thai fish sauce. AU - Lapsongphon,Nawaporn, AU - Yongsawatdigul,Jirawat, AU - Cadwallader,Keith R, Y1 - 2015/03/10/ PY - 2015/3/3/entrez PY - 2015/3/3/pubmed PY - 2015/10/22/medline KW - aroma extract dilution analysis KW - fish sauce KW - odor-activity value KW - odorant KW - omission study KW - recombination study SP - 2628 EP - 38 JF - Journal of agricultural and food chemistry JO - J Agric Food Chem VL - 63 IS - 10 N2 - Comprehensive analysis of the potent odorants in Thai premium fish sauce samples was accomplished by use of complementary volatile isolation methods combined with gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) and GC-mass spectrometry. Odorants of intermediate and low volatility were determined by direct solvent extraction/solvent-assisted flavor evaporation (DSE-SAFE) and aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA). Meanwhile, static headspace dilution analysis (SHDA) and headspace solid-phase microextraction (H-SPME) were used to determine the highly volatile odorants. Results of AEDA indicated the importance (log3FD factor≥6) of five acidic odorants (butanoic acid, 3-methylbutanoic acid, 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone, 4-hydroxy-2-ethyl-5-methyl-3(2H)-furanone, and 2-phenylacetic acid) and four neutral/basic odorants (3-methylbutanal, (Z)-1,5-octadien-3-one, phenylacetaldehyde, and o-aminoacetophone). Results of SHDA indicated the predominant (log3FD factors≥5) headspace odorants were methanethiol, 2-methylpropanal, 2-methylbutanal, 3-methylbutanal, dimethyl trisulfide, 3-(methylthio)propanal, and butanoic acid. Concentrations for 21 odorants were determined by stable isotope dilution analysis (SIDA), and their odor-activity values (OAVs) were calculated. Among these, methanethiol, 2-methylpropanal, 3-methylbutanal, dimethyl trisulfide, 3-(methylthio)propanal, and butanoic acid had the highest OAVs (>500). Results of aroma recombination and omission studies revealed the importance of acids, aldehydes, and sulfur-containing compounds to the overall aroma of the Thai fish sauce. SN - 1520-5118 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25730550/Identification_and_characterization_of_the_aroma_impact_components_of_Thai_fish_sauce_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -