Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Higher diet quality is inversely associated with mortality in African-American women.
J Nutr 2015; 145(3):547-54JN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Diet quality has been inversely associated with overall mortality in white populations, but the evidence in African-American populations is limited.

OBJECTIVE

The goal of the present study was to assess diet quality in relation to all-cause mortality in the Black Women's Health Study, a follow-up study of African-American women begun in 1995.

METHODS

Data used in this study were obtained via biennial questionnaires from 1995 to 2011. Based on food-frequency questionnaire data collected in 1995 and 2001, we calculated an index-based diet quality score [Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)] and derived dietary patterns (prudent and Western) with the use of factor analysis. We followed 37,001 women who were aged 30-69 y and free of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes at baseline for mortality through 2011. Multivariable Cox regression was used to estimate HRs and 95% CIs. Analyses were conducted in 2014.

RESULTS

Based on a total of 1678 deaths during 16 y of follow-up, higher DASH scores were associated with reduced all-cause mortality (HR: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.63, 0.89 for highest vs. lowest quintiles). The DASH components most strongly associated with lower mortality were high intake of whole grains and low intake of red and processed meat. A Western dietary pattern, characterized by high intake of red and processed meat, was associated with increased all-cause mortality rates (HR: 1.37; 95% CI: 1.17, 1.60 for highest vs. lowest quintiles of score); a prudent dietary pattern was not associated with risk.

CONCLUSION

A DASH-style diet high in intake of whole grains and low in consumption of red meat is associated with reduced mortality rates in healthy African-American women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University, Boston, MA.Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University, Boston, MA.Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University, Boston, MA.Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University, Boston, MA lrosenbe@bu.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25733471

Citation

Boggs, Deborah A., et al. "Higher Diet Quality Is Inversely Associated With Mortality in African-American Women." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 145, no. 3, 2015, pp. 547-54.
Boggs DA, Ban Y, Palmer JR, et al. Higher diet quality is inversely associated with mortality in African-American women. J Nutr. 2015;145(3):547-54.
Boggs, D. A., Ban, Y., Palmer, J. R., & Rosenberg, L. (2015). Higher diet quality is inversely associated with mortality in African-American women. The Journal of Nutrition, 145(3), pp. 547-54. doi:10.3945/jn.114.195735.
Boggs DA, et al. Higher Diet Quality Is Inversely Associated With Mortality in African-American Women. J Nutr. 2015;145(3):547-54. PubMed PMID: 25733471.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Higher diet quality is inversely associated with mortality in African-American women. AU - Boggs,Deborah A, AU - Ban,Yulun, AU - Palmer,Julie R, AU - Rosenberg,Lynn, Y1 - 2014/12/31/ PY - 2015/3/4/entrez PY - 2015/3/4/pubmed PY - 2015/4/29/medline KW - African Americans KW - all-cause mortality KW - cohort study KW - diet quality KW - women's health SP - 547 EP - 54 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 145 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Diet quality has been inversely associated with overall mortality in white populations, but the evidence in African-American populations is limited. OBJECTIVE: The goal of the present study was to assess diet quality in relation to all-cause mortality in the Black Women's Health Study, a follow-up study of African-American women begun in 1995. METHODS: Data used in this study were obtained via biennial questionnaires from 1995 to 2011. Based on food-frequency questionnaire data collected in 1995 and 2001, we calculated an index-based diet quality score [Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)] and derived dietary patterns (prudent and Western) with the use of factor analysis. We followed 37,001 women who were aged 30-69 y and free of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes at baseline for mortality through 2011. Multivariable Cox regression was used to estimate HRs and 95% CIs. Analyses were conducted in 2014. RESULTS: Based on a total of 1678 deaths during 16 y of follow-up, higher DASH scores were associated with reduced all-cause mortality (HR: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.63, 0.89 for highest vs. lowest quintiles). The DASH components most strongly associated with lower mortality were high intake of whole grains and low intake of red and processed meat. A Western dietary pattern, characterized by high intake of red and processed meat, was associated with increased all-cause mortality rates (HR: 1.37; 95% CI: 1.17, 1.60 for highest vs. lowest quintiles of score); a prudent dietary pattern was not associated with risk. CONCLUSION: A DASH-style diet high in intake of whole grains and low in consumption of red meat is associated with reduced mortality rates in healthy African-American women. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25733471/Higher_diet_quality_is_inversely_associated_with_mortality_in_African_American_women_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.114.195735 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -