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Beverage habits and mortality in Chinese adults.
J Nutr. 2015 Mar; 145(3):595-604.JN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

There is limited research examining beverage habits, one of the most habitual dietary behaviors, with mortality risk.

OBJECTIVE

This study examined the association between coffee, black and green tea, sugar-sweetened beverages (soft drinks and juice), and alcohol and all-cause and cause-specific mortality.

METHODS

A prospective data analysis was conducted with the use of the Singapore Chinese Health Study, including 52,584 Chinese men and women (aged 45-74 y) free of diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and cancer at baseline (1993-1998) and followed through 2011 with 10,029 deaths. Beverages were examined with all-cause and cause-specific (cancer, CVD, and respiratory disease) mortality risk with the use of Cox proportional hazards regression.

RESULTS

The associations between coffee, black tea, and alcohol intake and all-cause mortality were modified by smoking status. Among never-smokers there was an inverse dose-response association between higher amounts of coffee and black tea intake and all-cause, respiratory-related, and CVD mortality (black tea only). The fully adjusted HRs for all-cause mortality for coffee for <1/d, 1/d, and ≥2/d relative to no coffee intake were 0.89, 0.86, and 0.83, respectively (P-trend = 0.0003). For the same black tea categories the HRs were 0.95, 0.90, and 0.72, respectively (P-trend = 0.0005). Among ever-smokers there was no association between coffee or black tea and the outcomes. Relative to no alcohol, light to moderate intake was inversely associated with all-cause mortality (HR: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.79, 0.96) in never-smokers with a similar magnitude of association in ever-smokers. There was no association between heavy alcohol intake and all-cause mortality in never-smokers and a strong positive association in ever-smokers (HR: 1.56; 95% CI: 1.40, 1.74). Green tea and sugar-sweetened beverages were not associated with all-cause or cause-specific mortality.

CONCLUSIONS

Higher coffee and black tea intake was inversely associated with mortality in never-smokers, light to moderate alcohol intake was inversely associated with mortality regardless of smoking status, heavy alcohol intake was positively associated with mortality in ever-smokers, and there was no association between sugar-sweetened beverages and green tea and mortality.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, School of Medicine, University of California-Irvine, Irvine, CA; aodegaar@uci.edu.Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore, Singapore; Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore, Singapore;Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, and Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA; and.Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25733477

Citation

Odegaard, Andrew O., et al. "Beverage Habits and Mortality in Chinese Adults." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 145, no. 3, 2015, pp. 595-604.
Odegaard AO, Koh WP, Yuan JM, et al. Beverage habits and mortality in Chinese adults. J Nutr. 2015;145(3):595-604.
Odegaard, A. O., Koh, W. P., Yuan, J. M., & Pereira, M. A. (2015). Beverage habits and mortality in Chinese adults. The Journal of Nutrition, 145(3), 595-604. https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.114.200253
Odegaard AO, et al. Beverage Habits and Mortality in Chinese Adults. J Nutr. 2015;145(3):595-604. PubMed PMID: 25733477.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Beverage habits and mortality in Chinese adults. AU - Odegaard,Andrew O, AU - Koh,Woon-Puay, AU - Yuan,Jian-Min, AU - Pereira,Mark A, Y1 - 2015/01/21/ PY - 2015/3/4/entrez PY - 2015/3/4/pubmed PY - 2015/4/29/medline KW - Asian KW - alcohol KW - all-cause mortality KW - black tea KW - cause-specific mortality KW - coffee KW - green tea KW - juice KW - soft drinks SP - 595 EP - 604 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 145 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: There is limited research examining beverage habits, one of the most habitual dietary behaviors, with mortality risk. OBJECTIVE: This study examined the association between coffee, black and green tea, sugar-sweetened beverages (soft drinks and juice), and alcohol and all-cause and cause-specific mortality. METHODS: A prospective data analysis was conducted with the use of the Singapore Chinese Health Study, including 52,584 Chinese men and women (aged 45-74 y) free of diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and cancer at baseline (1993-1998) and followed through 2011 with 10,029 deaths. Beverages were examined with all-cause and cause-specific (cancer, CVD, and respiratory disease) mortality risk with the use of Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS: The associations between coffee, black tea, and alcohol intake and all-cause mortality were modified by smoking status. Among never-smokers there was an inverse dose-response association between higher amounts of coffee and black tea intake and all-cause, respiratory-related, and CVD mortality (black tea only). The fully adjusted HRs for all-cause mortality for coffee for <1/d, 1/d, and ≥2/d relative to no coffee intake were 0.89, 0.86, and 0.83, respectively (P-trend = 0.0003). For the same black tea categories the HRs were 0.95, 0.90, and 0.72, respectively (P-trend = 0.0005). Among ever-smokers there was no association between coffee or black tea and the outcomes. Relative to no alcohol, light to moderate intake was inversely associated with all-cause mortality (HR: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.79, 0.96) in never-smokers with a similar magnitude of association in ever-smokers. There was no association between heavy alcohol intake and all-cause mortality in never-smokers and a strong positive association in ever-smokers (HR: 1.56; 95% CI: 1.40, 1.74). Green tea and sugar-sweetened beverages were not associated with all-cause or cause-specific mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Higher coffee and black tea intake was inversely associated with mortality in never-smokers, light to moderate alcohol intake was inversely associated with mortality regardless of smoking status, heavy alcohol intake was positively associated with mortality in ever-smokers, and there was no association between sugar-sweetened beverages and green tea and mortality. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25733477/Beverage_habits_and_mortality_in_Chinese_adults_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.114.200253 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -