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Associations of key diet-quality indexes with mortality in the Multiethnic Cohort: the Dietary Patterns Methods Project.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Healthy dietary patterns have been linked positively with health and longevity. However, prospective studies in diverse populations in the United States addressing dietary patterns and mortality are limited.

OBJECTIVE

We assessed the ability of the following 4 diet-quality indexes [the Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010), the Alternative HEI-2010 (AHEI-2010), the alternate Mediterranean diet score (aMED), and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)] to predict the reduction in risk of mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and cancer.

DESIGN

White, African American, Native Hawaiian, Japanese American, and Latino adults (n = 215,782) from the Multiethnic Cohort completed a quantitative food-frequency questionnaire. Scores for each dietary index were computed and divided into quintiles for men and women. Mortality was documented over 13-18 y of follow-up. HRs and 95% CIs were computed by using adjusted Cox models.

RESULTS

High HEI-2010, AHEI-2010, aMED, and DASH scores were all inversely associated with risk of mortality from all causes, CVD, and cancer in both men and women (P-trend < 0.0001 for all models). For men, the HEI-2010 was consistently associated with a reduction in risk of mortality for all causes (HR: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.71, 0.79), CVD (HR: 0.74; 95% CI: 0.69, 0.81), and cancer (HR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.70, 0.83) when lowest and highest quintiles were compared. In women, the AHEI and aMED showed large reductions for all-cause mortality (HR: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.74, 0.82), the AHEI showed large reductions for CVD (HR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.69, 0.83), and the aMED showed large reductions for cancer (HR: 0.84; 95% CI: 0.76, 0. 92).

CONCLUSION

These results, in a US multiethnic population, suggest that consuming a dietary pattern that achieves a high diet-quality index score is associated with lower risk of mortality from all causes, CVD, and cancer in adult men and women.

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    ,

    From the Departmental and Institutional Affiliations, Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI (BE Harmon, CJB, YBS, RE, LRW, LLM, and LNK); the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD (JR); and the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (BE Henderson).

    ,

    From the Departmental and Institutional Affiliations, Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI (BE Harmon, CJB, YBS, RE, LRW, LLM, and LNK); the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD (JR); and the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (BE Henderson).

    ,

    From the Departmental and Institutional Affiliations, Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI (BE Harmon, CJB, YBS, RE, LRW, LLM, and LNK); the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD (JR); and the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (BE Henderson).

    ,

    From the Departmental and Institutional Affiliations, Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI (BE Harmon, CJB, YBS, RE, LRW, LLM, and LNK); the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD (JR); and the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (BE Henderson).

    ,

    From the Departmental and Institutional Affiliations, Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI (BE Harmon, CJB, YBS, RE, LRW, LLM, and LNK); the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD (JR); and the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (BE Henderson).

    ,

    From the Departmental and Institutional Affiliations, Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI (BE Harmon, CJB, YBS, RE, LRW, LLM, and LNK); the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD (JR); and the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (BE Henderson).

    ,

    From the Departmental and Institutional Affiliations, Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI (BE Harmon, CJB, YBS, RE, LRW, LLM, and LNK); the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD (JR); and the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (BE Henderson).

    ,

    From the Departmental and Institutional Affiliations, Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI (BE Harmon, CJB, YBS, RE, LRW, LLM, and LNK); the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD (JR); and the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (BE Henderson).

    From the Departmental and Institutional Affiliations, Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI (BE Harmon, CJB, YBS, RE, LRW, LLM, and LNK); the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD (JR); and the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (BE Henderson).

    Source

    MeSH

    African Americans
    Aged
    Asian Americans
    Cardiovascular Diseases
    Cohort Studies
    Diet
    European Continental Ancestry Group
    Female
    Follow-Up Studies
    Guidelines as Topic
    Hawaii
    Health Promotion
    Hispanic Americans
    Humans
    Japan
    Los Angeles
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Mortality
    Neoplasms
    Oceanic Ancestry Group
    Patient Compliance
    Prospective Studies

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Multicenter Study
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    25733644

    Citation

    Harmon, Brook E., et al. "Associations of Key Diet-quality Indexes With Mortality in the Multiethnic Cohort: the Dietary Patterns Methods Project." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 101, no. 3, 2015, pp. 587-97.
    Harmon BE, Boushey CJ, Shvetsov YB, et al. Associations of key diet-quality indexes with mortality in the Multiethnic Cohort: the Dietary Patterns Methods Project. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;101(3):587-97.
    Harmon, B. E., Boushey, C. J., Shvetsov, Y. B., Ettienne, R., Reedy, J., Wilkens, L. R., ... Kolonel, L. N. (2015). Associations of key diet-quality indexes with mortality in the Multiethnic Cohort: the Dietary Patterns Methods Project. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 101(3), pp. 587-97. doi:10.3945/ajcn.114.090688.
    Harmon BE, et al. Associations of Key Diet-quality Indexes With Mortality in the Multiethnic Cohort: the Dietary Patterns Methods Project. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;101(3):587-97. PubMed PMID: 25733644.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Associations of key diet-quality indexes with mortality in the Multiethnic Cohort: the Dietary Patterns Methods Project. AU - Harmon,Brook E, AU - Boushey,Carol J, AU - Shvetsov,Yurii B, AU - Ettienne,Reynolette, AU - Reedy,Jill, AU - Wilkens,Lynne R, AU - Le Marchand,Loic, AU - Henderson,Brian E, AU - Kolonel,Laurence N, Y1 - 2015/01/07/ PY - 2015/3/4/entrez PY - 2015/3/4/pubmed PY - 2015/4/29/medline KW - dietary indexes KW - epidemiology KW - multiethnic KW - risk factors KW - survival SP - 587 EP - 97 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 101 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Healthy dietary patterns have been linked positively with health and longevity. However, prospective studies in diverse populations in the United States addressing dietary patterns and mortality are limited. OBJECTIVE: We assessed the ability of the following 4 diet-quality indexes [the Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010), the Alternative HEI-2010 (AHEI-2010), the alternate Mediterranean diet score (aMED), and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)] to predict the reduction in risk of mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and cancer. DESIGN: White, African American, Native Hawaiian, Japanese American, and Latino adults (n = 215,782) from the Multiethnic Cohort completed a quantitative food-frequency questionnaire. Scores for each dietary index were computed and divided into quintiles for men and women. Mortality was documented over 13-18 y of follow-up. HRs and 95% CIs were computed by using adjusted Cox models. RESULTS: High HEI-2010, AHEI-2010, aMED, and DASH scores were all inversely associated with risk of mortality from all causes, CVD, and cancer in both men and women (P-trend < 0.0001 for all models). For men, the HEI-2010 was consistently associated with a reduction in risk of mortality for all causes (HR: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.71, 0.79), CVD (HR: 0.74; 95% CI: 0.69, 0.81), and cancer (HR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.70, 0.83) when lowest and highest quintiles were compared. In women, the AHEI and aMED showed large reductions for all-cause mortality (HR: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.74, 0.82), the AHEI showed large reductions for CVD (HR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.69, 0.83), and the aMED showed large reductions for cancer (HR: 0.84; 95% CI: 0.76, 0. 92). CONCLUSION: These results, in a US multiethnic population, suggest that consuming a dietary pattern that achieves a high diet-quality index score is associated with lower risk of mortality from all causes, CVD, and cancer in adult men and women. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25733644/Associations_of_key_diet_quality_indexes_with_mortality_in_the_Multiethnic_Cohort:_the_Dietary_Patterns_Methods_Project_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.114.090688 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -