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Detection of thiol modifications by hydrogen sulfide.
Methods Enzymol. 2015; 555:233-51.ME

Abstract

Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important gasotransmitter in both animals and plants. Many physiological events, including responses to stress, have been suggested to involve H2S, at least in part. On the other hand, numerous responses have been reported following treatment with H2S, including changes in the levels of antioxidants and the activities of transcription factors. Therefore, it is important to understand and unravel the events that are taking place downstream of H2S in signaling pathways. H2S is known to interact with other reactive signaling molecules such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). One of the mechanisms by which ROS and NO have effects in a cell is the modification of thiol groups on proteins, by oxidation or S-nitrosylation, respectively. Recently, it has been reported that H2S can also modify thiols. Here we report a method for the determination of thiol modifications on proteins following the treatment with biological samples with H2S donors. Here, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is used as a model system but this method can be used for samples from other animals or plants.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences, University of the West of England, Bristol, United Kingdom.Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences, University of the West of England, Bristol, United Kingdom.University of Exeter Medical School, University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom.Biosciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom.Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences, University of the West of England, Bristol, United Kingdom.Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences, University of the West of England, Bristol, United Kingdom.Faculty of Agriculture, University of Osijek, Osijek, Croatia.Faculty of Agriculture, University of Osijek, Osijek, Croatia.Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences, University of the West of England, Bristol, United Kingdom. Electronic address: john.hancock@uwe.ac.uk.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25747483

Citation

Williams, E, et al. "Detection of Thiol Modifications By Hydrogen Sulfide." Methods in Enzymology, vol. 555, 2015, pp. 233-51.
Williams E, Pead S, Whiteman M, et al. Detection of thiol modifications by hydrogen sulfide. Methods Enzymol. 2015;555:233-51.
Williams, E., Pead, S., Whiteman, M., Wood, M. E., Wilson, I. D., Ladomery, M. R., Teklic, T., Lisjak, M., & Hancock, J. T. (2015). Detection of thiol modifications by hydrogen sulfide. Methods in Enzymology, 555, 233-51. https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.mie.2014.11.026
Williams E, et al. Detection of Thiol Modifications By Hydrogen Sulfide. Methods Enzymol. 2015;555:233-51. PubMed PMID: 25747483.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Detection of thiol modifications by hydrogen sulfide. AU - Williams,E, AU - Pead,S, AU - Whiteman,M, AU - Wood,M E, AU - Wilson,I D, AU - Ladomery,M R, AU - Teklic,T, AU - Lisjak,M, AU - Hancock,J T, Y1 - 2015/01/08/ PY - 2015/3/10/entrez PY - 2015/3/10/pubmed PY - 2015/12/15/medline KW - C. elegans KW - Hydrogen sulfide KW - Nitric oxide KW - Protein modification KW - Reactive oxygen species KW - Thiols SP - 233 EP - 51 JF - Methods in enzymology JO - Methods Enzymol VL - 555 N2 - Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important gasotransmitter in both animals and plants. Many physiological events, including responses to stress, have been suggested to involve H2S, at least in part. On the other hand, numerous responses have been reported following treatment with H2S, including changes in the levels of antioxidants and the activities of transcription factors. Therefore, it is important to understand and unravel the events that are taking place downstream of H2S in signaling pathways. H2S is known to interact with other reactive signaling molecules such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). One of the mechanisms by which ROS and NO have effects in a cell is the modification of thiol groups on proteins, by oxidation or S-nitrosylation, respectively. Recently, it has been reported that H2S can also modify thiols. Here we report a method for the determination of thiol modifications on proteins following the treatment with biological samples with H2S donors. Here, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is used as a model system but this method can be used for samples from other animals or plants. SN - 1557-7988 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25747483/Detection_of_thiol_modifications_by_hydrogen_sulfide_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0076-6879(14)00091-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -