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Why are U.S. girls getting meningococcal but not human papilloma virus vaccines? Comparison of factors associated with human papilloma virus and meningococcal vaccination among adolescent girls 2008 to 2012.
Womens Health Issues. 2015 Mar-Apr; 25(2):97-104.WH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination rates in the United States remain low, compared with other recommended adolescent vaccines. We compared factors associated with intention to receive and receipt of HPV and meningococcal vaccines and completion of the HPV vaccine series among U.S. adolescent girls.

METHODS

Secondary analysis of data from the National Immunization Survey-Teen for 2008 through 2012 was performed. Multivariable logistic modeling was used to determine factors associated with intent to receive and receipt of HPV and meningococcal vaccination, completion of the HPV vaccine series among girls who started the series, and receipt of HPV vaccination among girls who received meningococcal vaccination.

FINDINGS

Provider recommendation increased the odds of receipt and intention to receive both HPV and meningococcal vaccines. Provider recommendation was also associated with a three-fold increase in HPV vaccination among girls who received meningococcal vaccination (p<.001), indicating a relationship between provider recommendation and missed vaccine opportunities. However, White girls were 10% more likely to report provider recommendation than Black or Hispanic girls (p<.01), yet did not have higher vaccination rates, implying a role for parental refusal. No factors predicted consistently the completion of the HPV vaccine series among those who started.

CONCLUSION

Improving provider recommendation for co-administration of HPV and meningococcal vaccines would reduce missed opportunities for initiating the HPV vaccine series. However, different interventions may be necessary to improve series completion.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: rebeccabperkins@gmail.com.Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts.Boston University School of Public Health, Edith Nourse Rogers Veterans Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25747517

Citation

Perkins, Rebecca B., et al. "Why Are U.S. Girls Getting Meningococcal but Not Human Papilloma Virus Vaccines? Comparison of Factors Associated With Human Papilloma Virus and Meningococcal Vaccination Among Adolescent Girls 2008 to 2012." Women's Health Issues : Official Publication of the Jacobs Institute of Women's Health, vol. 25, no. 2, 2015, pp. 97-104.
Perkins RB, Lin M, Silliman RA, et al. Why are U.S. girls getting meningococcal but not human papilloma virus vaccines? Comparison of factors associated with human papilloma virus and meningococcal vaccination among adolescent girls 2008 to 2012. Womens Health Issues. 2015;25(2):97-104.
Perkins, R. B., Lin, M., Silliman, R. A., Clark, J. A., & Hanchate, A. (2015). Why are U.S. girls getting meningococcal but not human papilloma virus vaccines? Comparison of factors associated with human papilloma virus and meningococcal vaccination among adolescent girls 2008 to 2012. Women's Health Issues : Official Publication of the Jacobs Institute of Women's Health, 25(2), 97-104. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.whi.2014.12.005
Perkins RB, et al. Why Are U.S. Girls Getting Meningococcal but Not Human Papilloma Virus Vaccines? Comparison of Factors Associated With Human Papilloma Virus and Meningococcal Vaccination Among Adolescent Girls 2008 to 2012. Womens Health Issues. 2015 Mar-Apr;25(2):97-104. PubMed PMID: 25747517.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Why are U.S. girls getting meningococcal but not human papilloma virus vaccines? Comparison of factors associated with human papilloma virus and meningococcal vaccination among adolescent girls 2008 to 2012. AU - Perkins,Rebecca B, AU - Lin,Mengyun, AU - Silliman,Rebecca A, AU - Clark,Jack A, AU - Hanchate,Amresh, PY - 2014/05/02/received PY - 2014/12/17/revised PY - 2014/12/19/accepted PY - 2015/3/10/entrez PY - 2015/3/10/pubmed PY - 2015/11/14/medline SP - 97 EP - 104 JF - Women's health issues : official publication of the Jacobs Institute of Women's Health JO - Womens Health Issues VL - 25 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination rates in the United States remain low, compared with other recommended adolescent vaccines. We compared factors associated with intention to receive and receipt of HPV and meningococcal vaccines and completion of the HPV vaccine series among U.S. adolescent girls. METHODS: Secondary analysis of data from the National Immunization Survey-Teen for 2008 through 2012 was performed. Multivariable logistic modeling was used to determine factors associated with intent to receive and receipt of HPV and meningococcal vaccination, completion of the HPV vaccine series among girls who started the series, and receipt of HPV vaccination among girls who received meningococcal vaccination. FINDINGS: Provider recommendation increased the odds of receipt and intention to receive both HPV and meningococcal vaccines. Provider recommendation was also associated with a three-fold increase in HPV vaccination among girls who received meningococcal vaccination (p<.001), indicating a relationship between provider recommendation and missed vaccine opportunities. However, White girls were 10% more likely to report provider recommendation than Black or Hispanic girls (p<.01), yet did not have higher vaccination rates, implying a role for parental refusal. No factors predicted consistently the completion of the HPV vaccine series among those who started. CONCLUSION: Improving provider recommendation for co-administration of HPV and meningococcal vaccines would reduce missed opportunities for initiating the HPV vaccine series. However, different interventions may be necessary to improve series completion. SN - 1878-4321 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25747517/Why_are_U_S__girls_getting_meningococcal_but_not_human_papilloma_virus_vaccines_Comparison_of_factors_associated_with_human_papilloma_virus_and_meningococcal_vaccination_among_adolescent_girls_2008_to_2012_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1049-3867(14)00154-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -