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Fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of lung cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

A meta-analysis was conducted to summarize evidence from prospective cohort studies about the association of fruit and vegetable consumption with the risk of lung cancer.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Pertinent studies were identified by a search of Embase and PubMed databases to October 2014. A random-effects model was used to combine study-specific relative risks and 95% confidence interval [RR (95% CI)]. Dose-response relationship was assessed by restricted cubic spline.

RESULTS

The RR (95% CI) of lung cancer for highest versus lowest category of fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption was 0.87 (0.79-0.95) (8 studies including 12,942 cases among 1,571,494 subjects), and the effect was 0.84 (0.79-0.90) for fruit (16 studies including 15,421 cases among 1,791,469 subjects) and 0.90 (0.84-0.96) for vegetable (19 studies including 16,422 cases among 1,877,375 subjects). The above-mentioned associations did not differed significantly in subgroup analysis by country, age, number of covariates adjusted, quality score, sex, smoking status and histological subtypes; however, studies with follow-up duration of ≥10 years and with FV assessed by interview showed a stronger association than those of <10 years and by self-administrated food frequency questionnaires, respectively. The risk of lung cancer decreased by 3% (P=0.07), 5% (P<0.01) and 3% (P=0.09) for every 1 serving/day increment in FV, fruit and vegetable consumption, respectively. There was a threshold around 2 servings/day of fruit and 2 servings/day of vegetable, respectively, after which the risk of lung cancer did not reduce further.

CONCLUSIONS

Fruit and vegetable consumption are inversely associated with risk of lung cancer.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Affiliated Hospital of Medical College of Qingdao University, Jiangsu Road, No. 19, Qingdao 266001, Shandong, PR China.

    ,

    Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Affiliated Hospital of Medical College of Qingdao University, Jiangsu Road, No. 19, Qingdao 266001, Shandong, PR China.

    ,

    Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Affiliated Hospital of Medical College of Qingdao University, Jiangsu Road, No. 19, Qingdao 266001, Shandong, PR China.

    ,

    Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Affiliated Hospital of Medical College of Qingdao University, Jiangsu Road, No. 19, Qingdao 266001, Shandong, PR China.

    ,

    Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Affiliated Hospital of Medical College of Qingdao University, Jiangsu Road, No. 19, Qingdao 266001, Shandong, PR China.

    Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Affiliated Hospital of Medical College of Qingdao University, Jiangsu Road, No. 19, Qingdao 266001, Shandong, PR China. Electronic address: qdwangmz1966@163.com.

    Source

    Lung cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands) 88:2 2015 May pg 124-30

    MeSH

    Female
    Fruit
    Humans
    Lung Neoplasms
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Prospective Studies
    Risk
    Risk Factors
    Vegetables

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Meta-Analysis

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    25747805

    Citation

    Wang, Yaopeng, et al. "Fruit and Vegetable Consumption and Risk of Lung Cancer: a Dose-response Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies." Lung Cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands), vol. 88, no. 2, 2015, pp. 124-30.
    Wang Y, Li F, Wang Z, et al. Fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of lung cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. Lung Cancer. 2015;88(2):124-30.
    Wang, Y., Li, F., Wang, Z., Qiu, T., Shen, Y., & Wang, M. (2015). Fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of lung cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. Lung Cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands), 88(2), pp. 124-30. doi:10.1016/j.lungcan.2015.02.015.
    Wang Y, et al. Fruit and Vegetable Consumption and Risk of Lung Cancer: a Dose-response Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies. Lung Cancer. 2015;88(2):124-30. PubMed PMID: 25747805.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of lung cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. AU - Wang,Yaopeng, AU - Li,Fei, AU - Wang,Zizong, AU - Qiu,Tong, AU - Shen,Yi, AU - Wang,Mingzhao, Y1 - 2015/02/26/ PY - 2014/10/14/received PY - 2014/12/21/revised PY - 2015/02/18/accepted PY - 2015/3/10/entrez PY - 2015/3/10/pubmed PY - 2015/12/29/medline KW - Fruit KW - Lung cancer KW - Meta-analysis KW - Prospective cohort studies KW - Vegetable SP - 124 EP - 30 JF - Lung cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands) JO - Lung Cancer VL - 88 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: A meta-analysis was conducted to summarize evidence from prospective cohort studies about the association of fruit and vegetable consumption with the risk of lung cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Pertinent studies were identified by a search of Embase and PubMed databases to October 2014. A random-effects model was used to combine study-specific relative risks and 95% confidence interval [RR (95% CI)]. Dose-response relationship was assessed by restricted cubic spline. RESULTS: The RR (95% CI) of lung cancer for highest versus lowest category of fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption was 0.87 (0.79-0.95) (8 studies including 12,942 cases among 1,571,494 subjects), and the effect was 0.84 (0.79-0.90) for fruit (16 studies including 15,421 cases among 1,791,469 subjects) and 0.90 (0.84-0.96) for vegetable (19 studies including 16,422 cases among 1,877,375 subjects). The above-mentioned associations did not differed significantly in subgroup analysis by country, age, number of covariates adjusted, quality score, sex, smoking status and histological subtypes; however, studies with follow-up duration of ≥10 years and with FV assessed by interview showed a stronger association than those of <10 years and by self-administrated food frequency questionnaires, respectively. The risk of lung cancer decreased by 3% (P=0.07), 5% (P<0.01) and 3% (P=0.09) for every 1 serving/day increment in FV, fruit and vegetable consumption, respectively. There was a threshold around 2 servings/day of fruit and 2 servings/day of vegetable, respectively, after which the risk of lung cancer did not reduce further. CONCLUSIONS: Fruit and vegetable consumption are inversely associated with risk of lung cancer. SN - 1872-8332 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25747805/Fruit_and_vegetable_consumption_and_risk_of_lung_cancer:_a_dose_response_meta_analysis_of_prospective_cohort_studies_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0169-5002(15)00125-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -