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Intradermal testing after negative skin prick testing for patients with high suspicion of allergy.
Int Forum Allergy Rhinol. 2015 Jun; 5(6):547-50.IF

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Skin testing is a widely accepted method for identifying inhalant allergies. Intradermal (ID) testing is often performed after negative skin prick testing (SPT) when a practitioner has a high level of clinical suspicion for a particular allergen.

METHODS

A retrospective chart review study was performed over a 5-year period in patients with negative SPT for airborne allergens who also underwent ID testing based on a high level of suspicion for clinical allergy.

RESULTS

Eighty-seven patients had negative SPT and went on to receive an average of 7 ID tests per patient. A total of 592 ID tests were performed after negative SPT. Of these, 20.8% (123/592) had a positive ID result with negative SPT. The allergens with the greatest percentage of positive ID results with negative SPTs were dog, cat, D. farinae, and D. pteronyssinus (33.3%, 34.3%, 39.4%, and 39.6%, respectively). The allergens least likely to test positive on ID testing after negative SPT were red maple, Cladosporium, and Alternaria (0%, 6.3%, and 6.5%, respectively).

CONCLUSION

Approximately 20% of all negative results on SPT will have a positive ID test, more likely for indoor allergens. If a high suspicion for allergy exists in a patient with a negative SPT result, it may be useful to proceed with ID testing. However, the clinical significance of a positive ID test after negative SPT still needs to be elucidated.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY.Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25756229

Citation

Larrabee, Yuna C., and William Reisacher. "Intradermal Testing After Negative Skin Prick Testing for Patients With High Suspicion of Allergy." International Forum of Allergy & Rhinology, vol. 5, no. 6, 2015, pp. 547-50.
Larrabee YC, Reisacher W. Intradermal testing after negative skin prick testing for patients with high suspicion of allergy. Int Forum Allergy Rhinol. 2015;5(6):547-50.
Larrabee, Y. C., & Reisacher, W. (2015). Intradermal testing after negative skin prick testing for patients with high suspicion of allergy. International Forum of Allergy & Rhinology, 5(6), 547-50. https://doi.org/10.1002/alr.21512
Larrabee YC, Reisacher W. Intradermal Testing After Negative Skin Prick Testing for Patients With High Suspicion of Allergy. Int Forum Allergy Rhinol. 2015;5(6):547-50. PubMed PMID: 25756229.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intradermal testing after negative skin prick testing for patients with high suspicion of allergy. AU - Larrabee,Yuna C, AU - Reisacher,William, Y1 - 2015/03/10/ PY - 2014/12/19/received PY - 2015/01/21/revised PY - 2015/01/25/accepted PY - 2015/3/11/entrez PY - 2015/3/11/pubmed PY - 2016/3/5/medline KW - allergens KW - allergic rhinitis KW - allergy immunotherapy KW - allergy injections KW - immunotherapy KW - rhinitis KW - skin prick test SP - 547 EP - 50 JF - International forum of allergy & rhinology JO - Int Forum Allergy Rhinol VL - 5 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Skin testing is a widely accepted method for identifying inhalant allergies. Intradermal (ID) testing is often performed after negative skin prick testing (SPT) when a practitioner has a high level of clinical suspicion for a particular allergen. METHODS: A retrospective chart review study was performed over a 5-year period in patients with negative SPT for airborne allergens who also underwent ID testing based on a high level of suspicion for clinical allergy. RESULTS: Eighty-seven patients had negative SPT and went on to receive an average of 7 ID tests per patient. A total of 592 ID tests were performed after negative SPT. Of these, 20.8% (123/592) had a positive ID result with negative SPT. The allergens with the greatest percentage of positive ID results with negative SPTs were dog, cat, D. farinae, and D. pteronyssinus (33.3%, 34.3%, 39.4%, and 39.6%, respectively). The allergens least likely to test positive on ID testing after negative SPT were red maple, Cladosporium, and Alternaria (0%, 6.3%, and 6.5%, respectively). CONCLUSION: Approximately 20% of all negative results on SPT will have a positive ID test, more likely for indoor allergens. If a high suspicion for allergy exists in a patient with a negative SPT result, it may be useful to proceed with ID testing. However, the clinical significance of a positive ID test after negative SPT still needs to be elucidated. SN - 2042-6984 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25756229/Intradermal_testing_after_negative_skin_prick_testing_for_patients_with_high_suspicion_of_allergy_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/alr.21512 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -