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Adult weight gain and adiposity-related cancers: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective observational studies.
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2015 Feb; 107(2)JNCI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Adiposity, measured by body mass index, is implicated in carcinogenesis. While adult weight gain has diverse advantages over body mass index in measuring adiposity, systematic reviews on adult weight gain in relation to adiposity-related cancers are lacking.

METHODS

PubMed and Embase were searched through September 2014 for prospective observational studies investigating the relationship between adult weight gain and the risk of 10 adiposity-related cancers. Dose-response meta-analyses were performed using a random-effects model to estimate summary relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for each cancer type. All statistical tests were two-sided.

RESULTS

A total of 50 studies were included. For each 5 kg increase in adult weight gain, the summary relative risk was 1.11 (95% CI = 1.08 to 1.13) for postmenopausal breast cancer among no- or low-hormone replacement therapy (HRT) users, 1.39 (95% CI = 1.29 to 1.49) and 1.09 (95% CI = 1.02 to 1.16) for postmenopausal endometrial cancer among HRT nonusers and users, respectively, 1.13 (95% CI = 1.03 to 1.23) for postmenopausal ovarian cancer among no or low HRT users, 1.09 (95% CI = 1.04 to 1.13) for colon cancer in men. The relative risk of kidney cancer comparing highest and lowest level of adult weight gain was 1.42 (95% CI = 1.11 to 1.81). Adult weight gain was unrelated to cancers of the breast (premenopausal women, postmenopausal HRT users), prostate, colon (women), pancreas, and thyroid. An increase in risk associated with adult weight gain for breast cancer was statistically significantly greater among postmenopausal women (P(heterogeneity) = .001) and HRT nonusers (P(heterogeneity) = .001); that for endometrial cancer was alike among HRT nonusers (P(heterogeneity) = .04).

CONCLUSIONS

Avoiding adult weight gain itself may confer protection against certain types of cancers, particularly among HRT nonusers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departments of Nutrition and Epidemiology (NK, DHL, FBH, ELG) and Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences (RK), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Division of Biostatistics, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK (DCG); Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway (DA); Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, London, UK (DA); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea (WJ); Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (FBH, ELG). nak212@mail.harvard.edu.Departments of Nutrition and Epidemiology (NK, DHL, FBH, ELG) and Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences (RK), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Division of Biostatistics, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK (DCG); Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway (DA); Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, London, UK (DA); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea (WJ); Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (FBH, ELG).Departments of Nutrition and Epidemiology (NK, DHL, FBH, ELG) and Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences (RK), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Division of Biostatistics, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK (DCG); Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway (DA); Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, London, UK (DA); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea (WJ); Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (FBH, ELG).Departments of Nutrition and Epidemiology (NK, DHL, FBH, ELG) and Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences (RK), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Division of Biostatistics, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK (DCG); Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway (DA); Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, London, UK (DA); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea (WJ); Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (FBH, ELG).Departments of Nutrition and Epidemiology (NK, DHL, FBH, ELG) and Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences (RK), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Division of Biostatistics, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK (DCG); Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway (DA); Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, London, UK (DA); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea (WJ); Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (FBH, ELG).Departments of Nutrition and Epidemiology (NK, DHL, FBH, ELG) and Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences (RK), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Division of Biostatistics, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK (DCG); Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway (DA); Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, London, UK (DA); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea (WJ); Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (FBH, ELG).Departments of Nutrition and Epidemiology (NK, DHL, FBH, ELG) and Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences (RK), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Division of Biostatistics, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK (DCG); Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway (DA); Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, London, UK (DA); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea (WJ); Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (FBH, ELG).Departments of Nutrition and Epidemiology (NK, DHL, FBH, ELG) and Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences (RK), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Division of Biostatistics, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK (DCG); Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway (DA); Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, London, UK (DA); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea (WJ); Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (FBH, ELG).

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25757865

Citation

Keum, NaNa, et al. "Adult Weight Gain and Adiposity-related Cancers: a Dose-response Meta-analysis of Prospective Observational Studies." Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 107, no. 2, 2015.
Keum N, Greenwood DC, Lee DH, et al. Adult weight gain and adiposity-related cancers: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective observational studies. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2015;107(2).
Keum, N., Greenwood, D. C., Lee, D. H., Kim, R., Aune, D., Ju, W., Hu, F. B., & Giovannucci, E. L. (2015). Adult weight gain and adiposity-related cancers: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective observational studies. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 107(2). https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djv088
Keum N, et al. Adult Weight Gain and Adiposity-related Cancers: a Dose-response Meta-analysis of Prospective Observational Studies. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2015;107(2) PubMed PMID: 25757865.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adult weight gain and adiposity-related cancers: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective observational studies. AU - Keum,NaNa, AU - Greenwood,Darren C, AU - Lee,Dong Hoon, AU - Kim,Rockli, AU - Aune,Dagfinn, AU - Ju,Woong, AU - Hu,Frank B, AU - Giovannucci,Edward L, Y1 - 2015/03/10/ PY - 2015/3/12/entrez PY - 2015/3/12/pubmed PY - 2015/4/29/medline JF - Journal of the National Cancer Institute JO - J. Natl. Cancer Inst. VL - 107 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Adiposity, measured by body mass index, is implicated in carcinogenesis. While adult weight gain has diverse advantages over body mass index in measuring adiposity, systematic reviews on adult weight gain in relation to adiposity-related cancers are lacking. METHODS: PubMed and Embase were searched through September 2014 for prospective observational studies investigating the relationship between adult weight gain and the risk of 10 adiposity-related cancers. Dose-response meta-analyses were performed using a random-effects model to estimate summary relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for each cancer type. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: A total of 50 studies were included. For each 5 kg increase in adult weight gain, the summary relative risk was 1.11 (95% CI = 1.08 to 1.13) for postmenopausal breast cancer among no- or low-hormone replacement therapy (HRT) users, 1.39 (95% CI = 1.29 to 1.49) and 1.09 (95% CI = 1.02 to 1.16) for postmenopausal endometrial cancer among HRT nonusers and users, respectively, 1.13 (95% CI = 1.03 to 1.23) for postmenopausal ovarian cancer among no or low HRT users, 1.09 (95% CI = 1.04 to 1.13) for colon cancer in men. The relative risk of kidney cancer comparing highest and lowest level of adult weight gain was 1.42 (95% CI = 1.11 to 1.81). Adult weight gain was unrelated to cancers of the breast (premenopausal women, postmenopausal HRT users), prostate, colon (women), pancreas, and thyroid. An increase in risk associated with adult weight gain for breast cancer was statistically significantly greater among postmenopausal women (P(heterogeneity) = .001) and HRT nonusers (P(heterogeneity) = .001); that for endometrial cancer was alike among HRT nonusers (P(heterogeneity) = .04). CONCLUSIONS: Avoiding adult weight gain itself may confer protection against certain types of cancers, particularly among HRT nonusers. SN - 1460-2105 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25757865/Adult_weight_gain_and_adiposity_related_cancers:_a_dose_response_meta_analysis_of_prospective_observational_studies_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jnci/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jnci/djv088 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -