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Functional roles of TRPV1 and TRPV4 in control of lower urinary tract activity: dual analysis of behavior and reflex during the micturition cycle.
Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2015 May 15; 308(10):F1128-34.AJ

Abstract

The present study used a dual analysis of voiding behavior and reflex micturition to examine lower urinary tract function in transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV)1 knockout (KO) mice and TRPV4 KO mice. In metabolic cage experiments conducted under conscious conditions (i.e., voluntary voiding behavior), TRPV4 KO mice showed a markedly higher voiding frequency (VF; 19.3 ± 1.2 times/day) and a smaller urine volume/voiding (UVV; 114 ± 9 μl) compared with wild-type (WT) littermates (VF: 5.2 ± 0.5 times/day and UVV: 380 ± 34 μl). Meanwhile, TRPV1 KO mice showed a similar VF to WT littermates (6.8 ± 0.5 times/day) with a significantly smaller UVV (276 ± 20 μl). Water intake among these genotypes was the same, but TRPV4 KO mice had a larger urine output than the other two groups. In cystometrogram experiments conducted in decerebrate unanesthetized mice (i.e., reflex micturition response), no differences between the three groups were found in any cystometrogram variables, including voided volume, volume threshold for inducing micturition contraction, maximal voiding pressure, and bladder compliance. However, both TRPV1 KO and TRPV4 KO mice showed a significant number of nonvoiding bladder contractions (NVCs; 3.5 ± 0.9 and 2.8 ± 0.7 contractions, respectively) before each voiding, whereas WT mice showed virtually no NVCs. These results suggest that in the reflex micturition circuit, a lack of either channel is involved in NVCs during bladder filling, whereas in the forebrain, it is involved in the early timing of urine release, possibly in the conscious response to the bladder instability.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Urology, University of Yamanashi Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Chuo, Yamanashi, Japan; PXN15164@nifty.ne.jp.Department of Urology, University of Yamanashi Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Chuo, Yamanashi, Japan;Department of Urology, University of Yamanashi Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Chuo, Yamanashi, Japan;Department of Urology, University of Yamanashi Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Chuo, Yamanashi, Japan;Department of Urology, University of Yamanashi Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Chuo, Yamanashi, Japan;Pharmacology Department, Nonclinical Research Center, Drug Development Service Segment, LSI Medience Corporation, Uto, Kumamoto, Japan;Division of Cell Signaling, Okazaki Institute for Integrative Bioscience (National Institute for Physiological Sciences), Okazaki, Aichi, Japan; and Department of Physiological Sciences, SOKENDAI (Graduate University for Advanced Studies), Okazaki, Aichi, Japan.Division of Cell Signaling, Okazaki Institute for Integrative Bioscience (National Institute for Physiological Sciences), Okazaki, Aichi, Japan; and.Division of Cell Signaling, Okazaki Institute for Integrative Bioscience (National Institute for Physiological Sciences), Okazaki, Aichi, Japan; and Department of Physiological Sciences, SOKENDAI (Graduate University for Advanced Studies), Okazaki, Aichi, Japan.Department of Urology, University of Yamanashi Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Chuo, Yamanashi, Japan;

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25761879

Citation

Yoshiyama, Mitsuharu, et al. "Functional Roles of TRPV1 and TRPV4 in Control of Lower Urinary Tract Activity: Dual Analysis of Behavior and Reflex During the Micturition Cycle." American Journal of Physiology. Renal Physiology, vol. 308, no. 10, 2015, pp. F1128-34.
Yoshiyama M, Mochizuki T, Nakagomi H, et al. Functional roles of TRPV1 and TRPV4 in control of lower urinary tract activity: dual analysis of behavior and reflex during the micturition cycle. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2015;308(10):F1128-34.
Yoshiyama, M., Mochizuki, T., Nakagomi, H., Miyamoto, T., Kira, S., Mizumachi, R., Sokabe, T., Takayama, Y., Tominaga, M., & Takeda, M. (2015). Functional roles of TRPV1 and TRPV4 in control of lower urinary tract activity: dual analysis of behavior and reflex during the micturition cycle. American Journal of Physiology. Renal Physiology, 308(10), F1128-34. https://doi.org/10.1152/ajprenal.00016.2015
Yoshiyama M, et al. Functional Roles of TRPV1 and TRPV4 in Control of Lower Urinary Tract Activity: Dual Analysis of Behavior and Reflex During the Micturition Cycle. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2015 May 15;308(10):F1128-34. PubMed PMID: 25761879.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Functional roles of TRPV1 and TRPV4 in control of lower urinary tract activity: dual analysis of behavior and reflex during the micturition cycle. AU - Yoshiyama,Mitsuharu, AU - Mochizuki,Tsutomu, AU - Nakagomi,Hiroshi, AU - Miyamoto,Tatsuya, AU - Kira,Satoru, AU - Mizumachi,Ryoji, AU - Sokabe,Takaaki, AU - Takayama,Yasunori, AU - Tominaga,Makoto, AU - Takeda,Masayuki, Y1 - 2015/03/11/ PY - 2015/01/15/received PY - 2015/03/10/accepted PY - 2015/3/13/entrez PY - 2015/3/13/pubmed PY - 2015/8/5/medline KW - bladder instability KW - central nervous system KW - forebrain KW - mouse KW - transient receptor potential vanilloid SP - F1128 EP - 34 JF - American journal of physiology. Renal physiology JO - Am J Physiol Renal Physiol VL - 308 IS - 10 N2 - The present study used a dual analysis of voiding behavior and reflex micturition to examine lower urinary tract function in transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV)1 knockout (KO) mice and TRPV4 KO mice. In metabolic cage experiments conducted under conscious conditions (i.e., voluntary voiding behavior), TRPV4 KO mice showed a markedly higher voiding frequency (VF; 19.3 ± 1.2 times/day) and a smaller urine volume/voiding (UVV; 114 ± 9 μl) compared with wild-type (WT) littermates (VF: 5.2 ± 0.5 times/day and UVV: 380 ± 34 μl). Meanwhile, TRPV1 KO mice showed a similar VF to WT littermates (6.8 ± 0.5 times/day) with a significantly smaller UVV (276 ± 20 μl). Water intake among these genotypes was the same, but TRPV4 KO mice had a larger urine output than the other two groups. In cystometrogram experiments conducted in decerebrate unanesthetized mice (i.e., reflex micturition response), no differences between the three groups were found in any cystometrogram variables, including voided volume, volume threshold for inducing micturition contraction, maximal voiding pressure, and bladder compliance. However, both TRPV1 KO and TRPV4 KO mice showed a significant number of nonvoiding bladder contractions (NVCs; 3.5 ± 0.9 and 2.8 ± 0.7 contractions, respectively) before each voiding, whereas WT mice showed virtually no NVCs. These results suggest that in the reflex micturition circuit, a lack of either channel is involved in NVCs during bladder filling, whereas in the forebrain, it is involved in the early timing of urine release, possibly in the conscious response to the bladder instability. SN - 1522-1466 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25761879/Functional_roles_of_TRPV1_and_TRPV4_in_control_of_lower_urinary_tract_activity:_dual_analysis_of_behavior_and_reflex_during_the_micturition_cycle_ L2 - https://journals.physiology.org/doi/10.1152/ajprenal.00016.2015?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -