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Traumatic brain injury among women veterans: an invisible wound of intimate partner violence.
Med Care. 2015 Apr; 53(4 Suppl 1):S112-9.MC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is prevalent among women Veterans and is known to increase women's risk for traumatic brain injury (TBI). IPV-related TBI has not been examined in the women Veteran population.

OBJECTIVES

To identify the occurrence of IPV-related TBI in a sample of women Veterans and examine the associations of IPV-related TBI with sociodemographic characteristics, health symptoms, health care utilization, and IPV experiences.

RESEARCH DESIGN

Cross-sectional mail survey conducted in 2013.

SUBJECTS

The sample comprised 176 New England Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) women Veteran patients.

MEASURES

Self-reported IPV-related TBI was assessed with a modified VA TBI screening tool. The survey included validated measures of depression (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; Posttraumatic Disorder Checklist) symptoms, as well as overall mental and physical health (SF-12), and IPV (Conflict Tactics Scales-Revised-2). Questions assessed past-year VA and non-VA health care use.

RESULTS

A total of 18.8% (n=33) met screening criteria for IPV-related TBI history. Women who experienced IPV-related TBI reported significantly higher depression (mean Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale scores: 26.6 vs. 20.7, P<0.0001) and PTSD (mean Posttraumatic Disorder Checklist scores: 53.2 vs. 34.1, P<0.0001) symptoms, and poorer perceptions of physical health (mean SF-12 34.6 vs. 42.3, P<0.01) than women who experienced IPV to the head without TBI. IPV-related TBI was also associated with poorer perceptions of mental health, as well as more frequent VA health care utilization and overall IPV.

CONCLUSIONS

IPV-related TBI is associated with poorer mental and physical health in women Veterans. This invisible injury is associated with greater VA health care utilization and IPV exposure. Implications for VA practice and policy are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

*National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, VA Boston Healthcare System †Department of Psychiatry, Boston University School of Medicine ‡Center for Healthcare Organization and Implementation Research, VA Boston Healthcare System §Department of Health Policy & Management, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25767964

Citation

Iverson, Katherine M., and Terri K. Pogoda. "Traumatic Brain Injury Among Women Veterans: an Invisible Wound of Intimate Partner Violence." Medical Care, vol. 53, no. 4 Suppl 1, 2015, pp. S112-9.
Iverson KM, Pogoda TK. Traumatic brain injury among women veterans: an invisible wound of intimate partner violence. Med Care. 2015;53(4 Suppl 1):S112-9.
Iverson, K. M., & Pogoda, T. K. (2015). Traumatic brain injury among women veterans: an invisible wound of intimate partner violence. Medical Care, 53(4 Suppl 1), S112-9. https://doi.org/10.1097/MLR.0000000000000263
Iverson KM, Pogoda TK. Traumatic Brain Injury Among Women Veterans: an Invisible Wound of Intimate Partner Violence. Med Care. 2015;53(4 Suppl 1):S112-9. PubMed PMID: 25767964.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Traumatic brain injury among women veterans: an invisible wound of intimate partner violence. AU - Iverson,Katherine M, AU - Pogoda,Terri K, PY - 2015/3/14/entrez PY - 2015/3/15/pubmed PY - 2015/5/16/medline SP - S112 EP - 9 JF - Medical care JO - Med Care VL - 53 IS - 4 Suppl 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is prevalent among women Veterans and is known to increase women's risk for traumatic brain injury (TBI). IPV-related TBI has not been examined in the women Veteran population. OBJECTIVES: To identify the occurrence of IPV-related TBI in a sample of women Veterans and examine the associations of IPV-related TBI with sociodemographic characteristics, health symptoms, health care utilization, and IPV experiences. RESEARCH DESIGN: Cross-sectional mail survey conducted in 2013. SUBJECTS: The sample comprised 176 New England Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) women Veteran patients. MEASURES: Self-reported IPV-related TBI was assessed with a modified VA TBI screening tool. The survey included validated measures of depression (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; Posttraumatic Disorder Checklist) symptoms, as well as overall mental and physical health (SF-12), and IPV (Conflict Tactics Scales-Revised-2). Questions assessed past-year VA and non-VA health care use. RESULTS: A total of 18.8% (n=33) met screening criteria for IPV-related TBI history. Women who experienced IPV-related TBI reported significantly higher depression (mean Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale scores: 26.6 vs. 20.7, P<0.0001) and PTSD (mean Posttraumatic Disorder Checklist scores: 53.2 vs. 34.1, P<0.0001) symptoms, and poorer perceptions of physical health (mean SF-12 34.6 vs. 42.3, P<0.01) than women who experienced IPV to the head without TBI. IPV-related TBI was also associated with poorer perceptions of mental health, as well as more frequent VA health care utilization and overall IPV. CONCLUSIONS: IPV-related TBI is associated with poorer mental and physical health in women Veterans. This invisible injury is associated with greater VA health care utilization and IPV exposure. Implications for VA practice and policy are discussed. SN - 1537-1948 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25767964/Traumatic_brain_injury_among_women_veterans:_an_invisible_wound_of_intimate_partner_violence_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/MLR.0000000000000263 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -