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Vitamin D deficiency in pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis: associated risk factors in the northern United States.
South Med J. 2015 Mar; 108(3):164-9.SM

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is associated with vitamin D deficiency, which can lead to adverse effects including recurrent pulmonary infections and osteoporosis. We longitudinally investigated calcifediol or 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels for our pediatric patients with CF based on the time of year as well as vitamin D supplementation dosing ranges for these patients at our CF center.

METHODS

We retrospectively evaluated vitamin D deficiency in our pediatric CF center for 2 years (baseline and annually) while evaluating 25(OH)D serum changes based on vitamin D supplementation, seasonality, patient age, and other factors associated with CF.

RESULTS

Vitamin D supplementation was noted to be higher than current Cystic Fibrosis Foundation dosing recommendations, and no patient experienced vitamin D toxicity. Seasonality was a strong indicator of 25(OH)D levels, especially during summer or fall. Significantly fewer patients with initially low 25(OH)D levels maintained low levels at the conclusion of the study, suggesting benefit. Older patient age and higher supplemental dosing correlated with significantly lower 25(OH)D levels.

CONCLUSIONS

This study suggests that targeted intervention among pediatric patients with CF living in northern latitudes of the United States, especially older children, is needed to prevent vitamin D deficiency.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the Departments of Psychology, Pediatric Pulmonology, and Pediatric Gastroenterology, Primary Children's Hospital, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City.From the Departments of Psychology, Pediatric Pulmonology, and Pediatric Gastroenterology, Primary Children's Hospital, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City.From the Departments of Psychology, Pediatric Pulmonology, and Pediatric Gastroenterology, Primary Children's Hospital, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City.From the Departments of Psychology, Pediatric Pulmonology, and Pediatric Gastroenterology, Primary Children's Hospital, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City.From the Departments of Psychology, Pediatric Pulmonology, and Pediatric Gastroenterology, Primary Children's Hospital, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City.From the Departments of Psychology, Pediatric Pulmonology, and Pediatric Gastroenterology, Primary Children's Hospital, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City.From the Departments of Psychology, Pediatric Pulmonology, and Pediatric Gastroenterology, Primary Children's Hospital, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City.

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25772050

Citation

Lansing, Amy Hughes, et al. "Vitamin D Deficiency in Pediatric Patients With Cystic Fibrosis: Associated Risk Factors in the Northern United States." Southern Medical Journal, vol. 108, no. 3, 2015, pp. 164-9.
Lansing AH, McDonald C, Patel RA, et al. Vitamin D deficiency in pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis: associated risk factors in the northern United States. South Med J. 2015;108(3):164-9.
Lansing, A. H., McDonald, C., Patel, R. A., Meihls, S., Crowell, K., Chatfield, B., & Pohl, J. F. (2015). Vitamin D deficiency in pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis: associated risk factors in the northern United States. Southern Medical Journal, 108(3), 164-9. https://doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000254
Lansing AH, et al. Vitamin D Deficiency in Pediatric Patients With Cystic Fibrosis: Associated Risk Factors in the Northern United States. South Med J. 2015;108(3):164-9. PubMed PMID: 25772050.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin D deficiency in pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis: associated risk factors in the northern United States. AU - Lansing,Amy Hughes, AU - McDonald,Catherine, AU - Patel,Raza A, AU - Meihls,Suzanne, AU - Crowell,Kody, AU - Chatfield,Barbara, AU - Pohl,John F, PY - 2015/3/17/entrez PY - 2015/3/17/pubmed PY - 2015/5/12/medline SP - 164 EP - 9 JF - Southern medical journal JO - South Med J VL - 108 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is associated with vitamin D deficiency, which can lead to adverse effects including recurrent pulmonary infections and osteoporosis. We longitudinally investigated calcifediol or 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels for our pediatric patients with CF based on the time of year as well as vitamin D supplementation dosing ranges for these patients at our CF center. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated vitamin D deficiency in our pediatric CF center for 2 years (baseline and annually) while evaluating 25(OH)D serum changes based on vitamin D supplementation, seasonality, patient age, and other factors associated with CF. RESULTS: Vitamin D supplementation was noted to be higher than current Cystic Fibrosis Foundation dosing recommendations, and no patient experienced vitamin D toxicity. Seasonality was a strong indicator of 25(OH)D levels, especially during summer or fall. Significantly fewer patients with initially low 25(OH)D levels maintained low levels at the conclusion of the study, suggesting benefit. Older patient age and higher supplemental dosing correlated with significantly lower 25(OH)D levels. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that targeted intervention among pediatric patients with CF living in northern latitudes of the United States, especially older children, is needed to prevent vitamin D deficiency. SN - 1541-8243 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25772050/Vitamin_D_deficiency_in_pediatric_patients_with_cystic_fibrosis:_associated_risk_factors_in_the_northern_United_States_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -