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A web-based personally controlled health management system increases sexually transmitted infection screening rates in young people: a randomized controlled trial.
J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2015 Jul; 22(4):805-14.JAMIA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine if a web-based personally controlled health management system (PCHMS) could increase the uptake of sexually transmitted infections (STI) screening among a young university population.

METHODS

A non-blinded parallel-group randomized controlled trial was conducted. Participants aged 18-29 years were recruited from a university environment between April and August 2013, and randomized 1:1 to either the intervention group (immediate online PCHMS access) or control group (no PCHMS access). The study outcome was self-reported STI testing, measured by an online follow-up survey in October 2013.

RESULTS

Of the 369 participants allocated to the PCHMS, 150 completed the follow-up survey, and of the 378 in the control group, 225 completed the follow-up survey. The proportion of the PCHMS group who underwent an STI test during the study period was 15.3% (23/150) compared with 7.6% (17/225) in the control group (P = .017). The difference in STI testing rates within the subgroup of sexually active participants (20.4% (23/113) of the PCHMS group compared with 9.6% (15/157) of the control group) was significantly higher (P = .027) than among non-sexually active participants.

DISCUSSION

Access to the PCHMS was associated with a significant increase in participants undergoing STI testing. This is also the first study to demonstrate efficacy of a PCHMS targeting a health concern where susceptibility is generally perceived as low and the majority of infections are asymptomatic.

CONCLUSION

PCHMS interventions may provide an effective means of increasing the demand for STI testing which, combined with increased opportunistic testing by clinicians, could reduce the high and sustained rates of STIs in young people.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Health Informatics, Australian Institute of Health Innovation, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia University Health Service, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.The Kirby Institute, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.Centre for Health Informatics, Australian Institute of Health Innovation, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia annie.lau@mq.edu.au.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25773130

Citation

Mortimer, Nathan J., et al. "A Web-based Personally Controlled Health Management System Increases Sexually Transmitted Infection Screening Rates in Young People: a Randomized Controlled Trial." Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association : JAMIA, vol. 22, no. 4, 2015, pp. 805-14.
Mortimer NJ, Rhee J, Guy R, et al. A web-based personally controlled health management system increases sexually transmitted infection screening rates in young people: a randomized controlled trial. J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2015;22(4):805-14.
Mortimer, N. J., Rhee, J., Guy, R., Hayen, A., & Lau, A. Y. (2015). A web-based personally controlled health management system increases sexually transmitted infection screening rates in young people: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association : JAMIA, 22(4), 805-14. https://doi.org/10.1093/jamia/ocu052
Mortimer NJ, et al. A Web-based Personally Controlled Health Management System Increases Sexually Transmitted Infection Screening Rates in Young People: a Randomized Controlled Trial. J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2015;22(4):805-14. PubMed PMID: 25773130.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A web-based personally controlled health management system increases sexually transmitted infection screening rates in young people: a randomized controlled trial. AU - Mortimer,Nathan J, AU - Rhee,Joel, AU - Guy,Rebecca, AU - Hayen,Andrew, AU - Lau,Annie Y S, Y1 - 2015/03/15/ PY - 2014/09/19/received PY - 2014/12/29/accepted PY - 2015/3/17/entrez PY - 2015/3/17/pubmed PY - 2015/12/15/medline KW - eHealth KW - personally controlled health management system KW - screening KW - sexually transmitted infection KW - young adult SP - 805 EP - 14 JF - Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association : JAMIA JO - J Am Med Inform Assoc VL - 22 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine if a web-based personally controlled health management system (PCHMS) could increase the uptake of sexually transmitted infections (STI) screening among a young university population. METHODS: A non-blinded parallel-group randomized controlled trial was conducted. Participants aged 18-29 years were recruited from a university environment between April and August 2013, and randomized 1:1 to either the intervention group (immediate online PCHMS access) or control group (no PCHMS access). The study outcome was self-reported STI testing, measured by an online follow-up survey in October 2013. RESULTS: Of the 369 participants allocated to the PCHMS, 150 completed the follow-up survey, and of the 378 in the control group, 225 completed the follow-up survey. The proportion of the PCHMS group who underwent an STI test during the study period was 15.3% (23/150) compared with 7.6% (17/225) in the control group (P = .017). The difference in STI testing rates within the subgroup of sexually active participants (20.4% (23/113) of the PCHMS group compared with 9.6% (15/157) of the control group) was significantly higher (P = .027) than among non-sexually active participants. DISCUSSION: Access to the PCHMS was associated with a significant increase in participants undergoing STI testing. This is also the first study to demonstrate efficacy of a PCHMS targeting a health concern where susceptibility is generally perceived as low and the majority of infections are asymptomatic. CONCLUSION: PCHMS interventions may provide an effective means of increasing the demand for STI testing which, combined with increased opportunistic testing by clinicians, could reduce the high and sustained rates of STIs in young people. SN - 1527-974X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25773130/A_web_based_personally_controlled_health_management_system_increases_sexually_transmitted_infection_screening_rates_in_young_people:_a_randomized_controlled_trial_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jamia/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jamia/ocu052 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -